U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 08-21-2017, 12:58 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,241,502 times
Reputation: 2222

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowboys fan in Houston View Post
The thing about Dallas is that its identity has evolved. I wouldnt say its losing it because its identity was never that firmly entrenched anyway.

Dallas used to be the capital of the far right religious right. It used to be known as a city hostile to the government thanks to the JFK assassination. It used to be known as a city that was super hostile to minorities. It used to be known as a place that lacked political diversity where everyone was conservative.

Im not at all implying racism isnt there because it is, but its certainly not what it was, but I think Dallas has shed a lot of those characteristics and I think thats a good thing. Its now a major city thats very ethnically diverse, seems welcoming to anyone, and its not as overwhelmingly religious as it once was (though that element is still there to a lesser degree).
Dallas has always had transplants, but it's doing a much better job at retention. It is actually fostering its creative class and accepting new ideas nowadays, not threatening it like it used to. That also includes adaptive reuse of old buildings. In many ways, it's trying to reconnect to the better aspects of its past, including its music heritage:

https://www.dallasnews.com/news/dall...c-508-park-ave
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-21-2017, 01:06 PM
 
2,231 posts, read 1,694,774 times
Reputation: 3682
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowboys fan in Houston View Post
The thing about Dallas is that its identity has evolved. I wouldnt say its losing it because its identity was never that firmly entrenched anyway.

Dallas used to be the capital of the far right religious right. It used to be known as a city hostile to the government thanks to the JFK assassination. It used to be known as a city that was super hostile to minorities. It used to be known as a place that lacked political diversity where everyone was conservative.

Im not at all implying racism isnt there because it is, but its certainly not what it was, but I think Dallas has shed a lot of those characteristics and I think thats a good thing. Its now a major city thats very ethnically diverse, seems welcoming to anyone, and its not as overwhelmingly religious as it once was (though that element is still there to a lesser degree).
Yeah, I know and get all of that. But minus the whole JFK assassination thing, the same stuff you named could pretty much be said about Houston decades ago. Or even Austin, to an extent.

Dallas HAS evolved into an economic powerhouse that's very diverse, but it still feels a lot less Texan, and a lot less unique, and a lot more bland and generic these days the more it has grown and the more it continues to explode in growth.

I can drive around Dallas and many of the surrounding suburbs and see an ABUNDANCE of Chipotles, Starbucks, and a bunch of other national chains and big box stores crowding corners, with more and more being built faster than you can blink. That's why I said Dallas has become "Anywhere, USA" and that's why Dallas has the "Nice, but bland" reputation that it does nationwide these days.

It's also why for those of us who live on the Dallas side of the DFW metro, if somebody comes to visit and they want an authentic "Texas" experience that they can't find back in the state that they're from, we many times take them over to neighboring Fort Worth, which hasn't erased everything old, historic, and authentically local in order to become shiny, new, and sterile like Dallas has. Heck, visitors to Dallas could eat at Chipotle or get coffee at Starbucks in any decent sized city in America. Reminds me of someone I know who visited NYC for the first time and the first place they wanted to eat at was MCDONALD'S.

As far as Texas cities go, at least Houston is a huge and eclectic melting pot, with just as many local mom and pop spots and ethnic restaurants and stores to be found without having to look too hard as there are national chains and big box stores. And as I said about Austin, it was already too heavily entrenched in "Texas-ness" for the droves of transplants who moved there to make it stop feeling like Texas.

Dallas has gone way too far in the opposite direction of, "Lets put TONS of everything here that every other city across America has, in order to appease everybody who's not from Dallas and make them like our city!" and it has backfired quite a bit, in the sense that, as I said, people from out of town and especially from out of state typically think of present day Dallas as, "Bland," "Boring," "Generic," "Sterile," and "Nothing special."

Last edited by Julio July; 08-21-2017 at 01:23 PM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-21-2017, 01:46 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,241,502 times
Reputation: 2222
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mentallect View Post
Dallas has gone way too far in the opposite direction of, "Lets put TONS of everything here that every other city across America has, in order to appease everybody who's not from Dallas and make them like our city!" and it has backfired quite a bit, in the sense that, as I said, people from out of town and especially from out of state typically think of present day Dallas as, "Bland," "Boring," "Generic," "Sterile," and "Nothing special."
Yet there has been an explosion of new, local businesses in places such as the Design District, Deep Ellum, Lower Greenville, North Oak Cliff, Oak Lawn, Trinity Groves, Knox-Henderson (mostly Henderson) etc. that didn't exist 5-10 years ago. I mean, you're joking right? Even Downtown is becoming less corporate. I've never had a Deep Ellum experience in Houston. Many visitors I've had to Dallas LOVE Trinity Groves, Lower Greenville, and Deep Ellum.

In any fast growing area, you're going to find an explosion of Anywhere, USA chains. In Dallas, the fastest growing areas are the suburbs. So naturally, they're going to have A LOT of chains. In the city itself, places such as Uptown/Victory Park have become a bit more corporate due to their faster growth than neighborhoods such as Downtown proper, Deep Ellum, Design District, North Oak Cliff, etc. I doubt Uptown had many chains before West Village was built. Look at Downtown Austin. You can walk around some streets and feel like you're in Victory Park. Much of Austin is trending towards "Domain-like" development. It's the side effect of massive growth. And there is no street in Austin like Oak Cliff's Jefferson Blvd.

But let's keep the Dallas is bland reputation. We don't want people ruining Deep Ellum.

Last edited by DTXman34; 08-21-2017 at 01:55 PM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-21-2017, 01:57 PM
 
2,231 posts, read 1,694,774 times
Reputation: 3682
Quote:
Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
Yet there has been an explosion of new, local businesses in places such as the Design District, Deep Ellum, Lower Greenville, North Oak Cliff, Oak Lawn, Trinity Groves, Knox-Henderson (mostly Henderson) etc. that didn't exist 5-10 years ago. I mean, you're joking right? Even Downtown is becoming less corporate. I've never had a Deep Ellum experience in Houston. Many visitors I've had to Dallas LOVE Trinity Groves, Lower Greenville, and Deep Ellum.
As a general rule of thumb, if you have to point to only a handful of streets or neighborhoods, or only one or two sections vicinity wise out of an entire city (especially one as big as Dallas) in order to find local culture and an abundance of businesses that aren't national chains, then your city---and most likely your metro, too---is already too far gone as far as the topic of "Cities that are losing their identities" go.

I know Dallas proponents hate to hear it, but FORT WORTH is what saves the DFW metro, as far as having a unique local culture, look, and feel that you can't find in Anywhere, USA.

Last edited by Julio July; 08-21-2017 at 02:15 PM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-21-2017, 02:18 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,241,502 times
Reputation: 2222
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mentallect View Post
As a general rule of thumb, if you have to point to only a handful of streets or neighborhoods, or only one or two sections vicinity wise out of an entire city (especially one as big as Dallas) in order to find local culture and an abundance of businesses that aren't national chains, then your city---and most likely your metro, too---is already too far gone as far as the topic of "Cities that are losing their identities" go.

I know it's not popular to say this to Dallas proponents, but Fort Worth is what saves the DFW metro, as far as having a unique local culture, look, and feel that you can't find in Anywhere, USA.
The same thing applies to Houston and Austin as well. You mean to tell me that every single square inch of those cities are filled with "uniqueness?" Uptown Houston? the Domain? I'll throw in San Antonio as well. Most of San Antonio is Anywhere, USA outside of the Greater Downtown area. Fort Worth outside of the Stockyards and parts of Downtown -- Anywhere USA. So what's your point? Are we talking about specific tourist attractions?

Dallas has been improving in terms of historic preservation and adaptive reuse, btw.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-21-2017, 02:55 PM
JJG
 
Location: Fort Worth
13,249 posts, read 19,194,434 times
Reputation: 7010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mentallect View Post

I know Dallas proponents hate to hear it, but FORT WORTH is what saves the DFW metro, as far as having a unique local culture, look, and feel that you can't find in Anywhere, USA.
We have preserved some things like the Stockyards, most of downtown, some of the Cultural District (West 7th) and Magnolia Ave. in the Near Southside, but yeah... we have pretty much what any other major city has.

It's not the worst thing in the world.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-21-2017, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Seattle
416 posts, read 248,099 times
Reputation: 1002
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mentallect View Post

Dallas has gone way too far in the opposite direction of, "Lets put TONS of everything here that every other city across America has, in order to appease everybody who's not from Dallas and make them like our city!" and it has backfired quite a bit, in the sense that, as I said, people from out of town and especially from out of state typically think of present day Dallas as, "Bland," "Boring," "Generic," "Sterile," and "Nothing special."
Everywhere is pretty much like that now. Seattle is not all chains, but quickly becoming all high end stuff. Looking for an affordable diner that isn't ironic? Better look in the suburbs.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-21-2017, 03:35 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,241,502 times
Reputation: 2222
Quote:
Originally Posted by jakebarnes View Post
Everywhere is pretty much like that now. Seattle is not all chains, but quickly becoming all high end stuff. Looking for an affordable diner that isn't ironic? Better look in the suburbs.
It's the side effect of fast growth, a lot of transplants, and a world that is a lot more connected today (e.g. Internet, social media) than in the past. Every city has a unique area or unique aspect to it. There's a spectrum of growth from slow to fast. I'm sure the slower growth parts of Seattle maintained a more local feel as opposed to the faster growing parts.

Dallas has actually produced a lot of restaurants that eventually became regional or national chains. I know of several local places that opened up a second place out in Fort Worth or out in the suburbs. Sometimes it will spread down to Austin and Houston (and vice versa).
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2017, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,560 posts, read 722,378 times
Reputation: 2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by sonnyinmiami View Post
I'm nearly 36 and I've noticed (as well as family and friends of mine, ages 30 and up) that regional dialects (accents) are disappearing. It's really a Sad thing to be a witness to, as everyone is starting to sound the same (you know, Valley Girl mixed with Vocal Fry and upspeak, uptalk, leaves the speaker sounding so unsure of themselves or what they're saying)..., I know some 20 somethings (in my family) that grew up in Queens, Brooklyn or Long Island thier entire lives and they sure don't sound like it. I poke fun at them and they poke right back telling me I sound like Popeye. But, seriously ..., really, really sad.
Yep. I'm 22, but I have the traditional Chicago accent you mostly find in middle-aged and older people - I guess because I was kind of a social recluse as a kid and paid more attention to my teachers and family friends than to my peers. The other day I was talking to someone my age born and raised in Evanston, who sounded just like you described, and he asked if I was "from somewhere". :/

I don't think this is necessarily a bad thing, though, when I detach my emotions from the topic and think about it rationally. Most accents are tied up with stereotypes of some kind, so if you don't sound like you're from anywhere in particular, no one can make fun of you for your accent.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-25-2017, 03:44 PM
 
Location: SE Pennsylvania
368 posts, read 270,055 times
Reputation: 340
New york
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top