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Old 08-25-2017, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Lakeland, Florida
6,972 posts, read 12,486,400 times
Reputation: 8715

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
I agree and would add Portland, OR to your list based on my many years of experience living there. It has lost its former unique qualities. It's like all the others you mentioned, carbon copies of one another.

But that what people want today and it's their turn so that's the way it is.
I definitely agree about Portland.
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Old 08-28-2017, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Big Bayou
721 posts, read 299,167 times
Reputation: 988
Quote:
Originally Posted by survivingearth View Post
This is a curiosity i have. The US is a melting pot of cultures, but are we loosing our identity? Is there a city that you would say it is loosing its roots because of this "explosion" of new cultures ?
San Francisco is like a completely new city thanks to Silicon Valley types moving in and pushing the eclectic liberal artsy types out.
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Old 09-01-2017, 05:11 AM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,578,118 times
Reputation: 6091
Quote:
Originally Posted by sonnyinmiami View Post
I'm nearly 36 and I've noticed (as well as family and friends of mine, ages 30 and up) that regional dialects (accents) are disappearing. It's really a Sad thing to be a witness to, as everyone is starting to sound the same (you know, Valley Girl mixed with Vocal Fry and upspeak, uptalk, leaves the speaker sounding so unsure of themselves or what they're saying)..., I know some 20 somethings (in my family) that grew up in Queens, Brooklyn or Long Island thier entire lives and they sure don't sound like it. I poke fun at them and they poke right back telling me I sound like Popeye. But, seriously ..., really, really sad.
I live in New York...hardly anyone around here sounds like Paulie Walnuts. There is a New York accent still, but it's not some super heavy mafioso sounding accent.

I bet that even if you watched a video of 70s New York, most people wouldn't have a particular thick accent.
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Old 09-01-2017, 05:15 AM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,578,118 times
Reputation: 6091
Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
I think all major cities have to a degree. The demographic shifts are one contributor, but the biggest contributor is the large amount of yuppies moving into major cities (myself included). Cities and neighborhoods are now being designed to attract young professionals. Back in the day there weren't nearly as many college grads and young professionals living in the city.

My friend who grew up in NYC, always says "New York isn't New York anymore." I think a lot of the older cities like NY, Philly, Boston, Chicago- have lost some of their identities at least to some degree.
That's kinda silly in my opinion. Of course it has changed a lot, as has almost every other city, but it's still very much New York.
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Old 09-01-2017, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Lafayette, La
2,035 posts, read 4,555,709 times
Reputation: 1422
My city is starting to grow and diversify but still maintains its very strong Cajun roots. It has certainly been diluted somewhat but a source of local pride is our Louisiana born stores and restaurants. Even some chains like Rouses are distinctly Louisianian.
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Old 09-01-2017, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,853 posts, read 2,980,597 times
Reputation: 3399
Austin....
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Old 09-01-2017, 11:00 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,732,432 times
Reputation: 30796
"Hey Man, I'm from City, the best city in the country. Your city is lame compared to City!"

"Oh, wow. Cool. So, were you born in City?"

"No... I was actually born in Town near lame city. :-( "
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Old 09-01-2017, 11:45 AM
 
Location: San Jose
2,112 posts, read 641,725 times
Reputation: 2256
Regional and civic identity was stronger in the past when communities were much more isolated. In there isolation cities and towns would develop there own accents, regional cuisine, architecture and music. With the internet and mass communication it takes no time for an idea or concept to spread the planet. The problem we have now is if you try to be unique it often comes across as forced and therefore pretentious and shallow. A unique civic identity needs to happen unintentionally and organically.
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Old 09-01-2017, 11:58 AM
 
Location: San Jose
2,112 posts, read 641,725 times
Reputation: 2256
Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
I think all major cities have to a degree. The demographic shifts are one contributor, but the biggest contributor is the large amount of yuppies moving into major cities (myself included). Cities and neighborhoods are now being designed to attract young professionals. Back in the day there weren't nearly as many college grads and young professionals living in the city.

My friend who grew up in NYC, always says "New York isn't New York anymore." I think a lot of the older cities like NY, Philly, Boston, Chicago- have lost some of their identities at least to some degree.
What has hurt cities like NY, SF, Boston, and Chicago more then the yuppies moving in is the working class moving out. Poor and working class people are the creators of most of the original art, food, and music.
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Old 09-01-2017, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
760 posts, read 588,972 times
Reputation: 1482
The majority of Millennials grew up in the privileged, culturally sheltered, generic, white suburbs. As these millennials start moving into the cities because they are "cool" now, they end up turning these once unique cities into the generic, cookie cutter suburbs that they all were desperate to flee.
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