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Old 08-14-2017, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Center City, Philadelphia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
It seems that across the country there is a push to brand/rebrand neighborhoods or large scale developments so that they evoke images of Manhattan.

For example, in Columbus we have a large mix-used development planned for the Arena District that is tentatively named Grand Central. South of Hudson, a residential neighborhood near OSU, has been branded SoHud.

When I visited Austin they seemed to be pushing hard to attract residents and businesses to "uptown".

I know that Atlanta there is debate over what was historically the westside vs. the new branding of west midtown.

Miami has its "upper east side".

What are some examples from your cities and how do you feel about it?
It's funny how you never mention the most famous term of all that originates from Manhattan, "Downtown" as in originally referring to Lower Manhattan. Downtown basically became a universal term for every American city's central business district.

Last edited by thedirtypirate; 08-14-2017 at 04:07 PM..
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Old 08-14-2017, 04:08 PM
 
9,382 posts, read 9,532,267 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
It's funny how you never mention the most famous term of all that originates from Manhattan, "Downtown" as in originally referring to Lower Manhattan. Downtown basically became a universal term for every American cities central business district.
In some cases though Downtown has nothing to do with New York, Downtown means Down River in New Orleans. While Downtown (or Island) on Nantucket is the east end not the central village (in reference to sailing).

Cities that use Downtown sparingly include Providence (Downcity) , New Orleans (CBD), Philly (Center City), Chicago (the Loop) and Charlotte (uptown) Interestingly Downtown Boston is often called just Boston locally and outer areas are called by name, if someone was going to Charlestown they would not say Boston but Charlestown, just between the North and South end is called Boston.
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Old 08-14-2017, 04:42 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
It's funny how you never mention the most famous term of all that originates from Manhattan, "Downtown" as in originally referring to Lower Manhattan. Downtown basically became a universal term for every American city's central business district.
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
In some cases though Downtown has nothing to do with New York, Downtown means Down River in New Orleans. While Downtown (or Island) on Nantucket is the east end not the central village (in reference to sailing).

Cities that use Downtown sparingly include Providence (Downcity) , New Orleans (CBD), Philly (Center City), Chicago (the Loop) and Charlotte (uptown) Interestingly Downtown Boston is often called just Boston locally and outer areas are called by name, if someone was going to Charlestown they would not say Boston but Charlestown, just between the North and South end is called Boston.
Btown, I believe Pirate is saying that the very word "Downtown" started in New York. It actually makes a lot of sense when you think about it, New York was the largest city in America by the 1800s and by that time had taken over the whole of Manhattan Island.

Manhattan is roughly oriented north and south so that someone saying they are going Uptown or Downtown is similar to the way someone would say they are going up North or down South. In the same way, the Hudson River is oriented north and south so today we have Upstate and Downstate.
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Old 08-14-2017, 05:16 PM
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Location: Miami
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
In some cases though Downtown has nothing to do with New York, Downtown means Down River in New Orleans. While Downtown (or Island) on Nantucket is the east end not the central village (in reference to sailing).

Cities that use Downtown sparingly include Providence (Downcity) , New Orleans (CBD), Philly (Center City), Chicago (the Loop) and Charlotte (uptown) Interestingly Downtown Boston is often called just Boston locally and outer areas are called by name, if someone was going to Charlestown they would not say Boston but Charlestown, just between the North and South end is called Boston.
You have a point here, and I find it very interesting; Downtown Birmingham is also called "Central City."
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Old 08-14-2017, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Btown, I believe Pirate is saying that the very word "Downtown" started in New York. It actually makes a lot of sense when you think about it, New York was the largest city in America by the 1800s and by that time had taken over the whole of Manhattan Island.

Manhattan is roughly oriented north and south so that someone saying they are going Uptown or Downtown is similar to the way someone would say they are going up North or down South. In the same way, the Hudson River is oriented north and south so today we have Upstate and Downstate.
That is really interesting. I'm a native NYer and never knew this is where the general term originates from. That makes a lot of sense. That explains why NYC doesn't really have a general "downtown" area in the same way other cities do. That's also why I never really liked using that term when talking about other cities. I usually say CBD instead.
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Old 08-14-2017, 06:48 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Default Downtown

Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
That is really interesting. I'm a native NYer and never knew this is where the general term originates from. That makes a lot of sense. That explains why NYC doesn't really have a general "downtown" area in the same way other cities do. That's also why I never really liked using that term when talking about other cities. I usually say CBD instead.
Now that is a good point also.

Downtown Manhattan used to be the main CBD for New York but has been bypassed by Midtown (granted Downtown is still huge). Yet even though their status as CBD as changed, Midtown has not been renamed Downtown lol.

In other words, to Manhattanites Downtown is not so much the CBD but more emphasis as a permanent location, in this case the southern part of Manhattan. This for me is further reinforcement that Downtown comes from Manhattan and then spread across the country.

Including btw, other parts of New York like Brooklyn and Flushing.
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Old 08-14-2017, 07:14 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,130 posts, read 9,901,913 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
It seems that across the country there is a push to brand/rebrand neighborhoods or large scale developments so that they evoke images of Manhattan.

For example, in Columbus we have a large mix-used development planned for the Arena District that is tentatively named Grand Central. South of Hudson, a residential neighborhood near OSU, has been branded SoHud.

When I visited Austin they seemed to be pushing hard to attract residents and businesses to "uptown".

I know that Atlanta there is debate over what was historically the westside vs. the new branding of west midtown.

Miami has its "upper east side".

What are some examples from your cities and how do you feel about it?
Off the top of my head, here on Long Island there are a number of communities that have a Broadway which I believe are named for the famous street in Manhattan.

In New York you have entire neighborhoods that sprang up during the Victorian era that were named for places in and around London. New Yorkers had a fascination with England and London in particular. Neighborhoods like Windsor Terrace, Brighton Beach & Kensington in Brooklyn and Kew Gardens, St Albans & Windsor Park in Queens. So naming places after someplace else is nothing new and New Yorkers do it too.

MANHATTAN BEACH.

Here is a little interesting side trivial note. Manhattan Beach is a neighborhood that is part of Coney Island, Brooklyn. Manhattan Beach was named for Manhattan in the 1800s before Brooklyn joined New York City. So Manhattan Beach was named for part of a different city (New York) and later became part of that very same city!

There is also a more famous Manhattan Beach in California. However I do not see them joining NYC anytime soon!
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Old 08-14-2017, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,112 posts, read 1,304,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
The Residences at The Lofts at SoDoSoPa


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=miXMWJyOdgw
This is hilarious. I love South Park!

How I met your Mother, which was set in NYC, had a fictional neighborhood called "DoWiSeTrePla" which is "Down Wind from the Sewage Treatment Plant".

Which reminds me of that one part of Greenpoint, Brooklyn.

And speaking of Brooklyn, back to OP's question, the most obvious answer I think would be right across the river from Manhattan, in Brooklyn, which is becoming very Manhattan-ized lately, in many different ways.
There's DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass)
And Downtown Brooklyn, which they are now calling "DoBro" to differentiate from Downtown Manhattan.

And going back to Manhattan real quick, people are trying to rebrand South Harlem as "SoHa", which I think is the worst one of all. I feel like some of these names work, and some just are very douchey and don't. SoHo, TriBeCa, NoLiTa, LES, DUMBO, etc. are fine, but you'll never catch me alive saying DoBro or SoHa.
FiDi I use as an abbreviation when typing or texting since it's much easier than typing out "The Financial District", but I don't say it out loud. Kind of like abbreviations people use while texting.
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Old 08-14-2017, 11:41 PM
 
Location: Cbus
1,720 posts, read 1,400,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by projectmaximus View Post
Midtown and Uptown are so ubiquitous that I don't consider them to be a reference to Manhattan anymore.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
Is this exactly relatable to Manhattan or is it just cities naming things based off their specific locations just like Manhattan has done to their neighborhoods based off their specific locations.

The "Grand Central" one I get though, that definitely reminds me of Manhattan. I mean Chicago has Uptown and Lower East side and Lower West side, etc - but those names have been around forever and are specific to their locations in the city. Probably developed around the same time many of Manhattan's areas were getting their location names.
I agree with you that the context/history matters. I was thinking more of recent developments or rebranding efforts that (try to) emulate Manhattan rather than historic communities that happen to share names with Manhattan neighborhoods. Also to projectmaximus's point "uptown" has become a fairly common designation in many cities outside of New York.
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Old 08-14-2017, 11:46 PM
 
Location: Cbus
1,720 posts, read 1,400,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
It's funny how you never mention the most famous term of all that originates from Manhattan, "Downtown" as in originally referring to Lower Manhattan. Downtown basically became a universal term for every American city's central business district.
I was thinking more of recent developments/branding efforts rather than a historic context but to your point Manhattan (and New York in general) has really influenced how we conceptualize urban areas in this country.

Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
This is hilarious. I love South Park!

How I met your Mother, which was set in NYC, had a fictional neighborhood called "DoWiSeTrePla" which is "Down Wind from the Sewage Treatment Plant".

Which reminds me of that one part of Greenpoint, Brooklyn.

And speaking of Brooklyn, back to OP's question, the most obvious answer I think would be right across the river from Manhattan, in Brooklyn, which is becoming very Manhattan-ized lately, in many different ways.
There's DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass)
And Downtown Brooklyn, which they are now calling "DoBro" to differentiate from Downtown Manhattan.

And going back to Manhattan real quick, people are trying to rebrand South Harlem as "SoHa", which I think is the worst one of all. I feel like some of these names work, and some just are very douchey and don't. SoHo, TriBeCa, NoLiTa, LES, DUMBO, etc. are fine, but you'll never catch me alive saying DoBro or SoHa.
FiDi I use as an abbreviation when typing or texting since it's much easier than typing out "The Financial District", but I don't say it out loud. Kind of like abbreviations people use while texting.
I guess even Manhattan can't escape its own influence LOL.
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