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Old 08-17-2017, 06:48 PM
 
221 posts, read 152,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RocketSci View Post
I asked my wife, who is non-Polish but married into the family, what her opinion was. She basically said that we "blend in" well, and that in general we are "bland." We don't have unique physical features that most non-Slavs identify us by. We generally just work hard, keep clean, keep a low profile, mind our own business, and just get on with our lives pretty much wherever we are.

I agree - probably lessons learned surviving centuries of being overrun by neighboring German, Russian, and Austrian empires.
Polish guy here that a accurate description about us.about pop culture on netflix is movie ice man about polish irish killer then was couple polish accents in boardwalk empire and like somebody mention before 2 season the wire was very polish that what i remeber for now . usually we portray as religion people hard workers or petty villans. I live in pa on border with nj and across jersey you can see big polish presence.
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Old 08-17-2017, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Naples Island
1,011 posts, read 638,736 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
When you have to add up all the ethnicities of half of Europe, some of which that don't even get along that well, I think you answered your own question as to why the descendants of one small island off of the coast of Western Europe are more influential.

The Irish and their descendants are pervasive across all of America at this point while many Eastern European descended people simply aren't
Irish-Americans are larger in number and their culture more interwoven in the fabric of mainstream American culture than Eastern Europeans because:

1) The Irish began immigrating in large numbers to America much earlier than most Eastern Europeans, beginning in the 1830's.

2) The Irish assimilated much more quickly than Eastern Europeans because they originated in the British Isles, which is the parent culture of America.

Even though the Irish were largely Roman Catholic, they still spoke English, looked like Anglo-Americans (there is a great deal of DNA overlap between Irish and English people) and a good deal of them had anglicized surnames (e.g., "Davidson" and "Lawton" are both surnames on my Irish side).
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Old 08-17-2017, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Chicago metro
3,506 posts, read 7,309,750 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citylove101 View Post
Although Eastern Europeans gentiles may be in short shrift in pop culture, in real life they are quite noticeable in many Midwestern and Northeastern cities. Chicago and Milwaukee have the Poles, Pittsburgh its Hungarians, New York its Albanians, Greeks, Ukranians, and Russian Orthodox. And I've heard that Baltimore still has a Lithuanian community.


Some smaller cities across the U.S. may also have particularly large Eastern European populations, but because those cities are small, they are not on most people's radar.
I have always looked at Greeks as Southern/Mediterranean European.


When it comes to pop culture, Russians are often portrayed as Mobsters/organized crime syndicates, just as how the Italians (specifically Sicilians)were portrayed during the 70s-90s. Russians pretty much holds the bulk of media regarding Eastern Europeans.
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Old 08-18-2017, 07:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
No one said they had to hate anyone more than their grandparents, but I certainly have seen people of a variety of ethnicities continue to have issues with people of other ethnicities even a century after their ancestors got here. Not saying everyone is running around hating everyone, but it happens. Imagine what you like.

I believe you but one would think ethnic issues between European ancestry groups are close to non existent now . It's interesting and strange to hear that they still exist . By the way have you noticed this type of thing only in Chicago ? Or does it crop up elsewhere as well ?
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Old 08-18-2017, 07:38 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Warszawa View Post
East Europeans assimilated and blended in really well. A lot of the immigration happened in the 19th and early 20th century, so over that time the cultural differences were erased
What's strange is that most Italian immigration occurred during the same time period , yet Italian Americans seem to identify more with their heritage than their Eastern European counterparts . I've always found that strange since most Italian immigrants weren't persecuted back home , though I suppose American society might have been more welcoming towards Eastern European immigrants than Italians .
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Old 08-18-2017, 07:43 PM
 
100 posts, read 62,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RocketSci View Post
Part of the visibility issue is that outside of major Eastern European immigrant population centers (NY, Chicago, Cleveland, Buffalo, Pittsburgh, etc) there are very few restaurants that highlight the presence of Eastern Europeans. Even in my family, Polish food was something made at home, not bought from a restaurant. The majority of Polish foods, and similar Eastern European foods, do not appeal to the tastes of most Americans.

Yes I never understood why Eastern European cuisine isn't more popular . As for the issue of blandness , I'd say that isn't really true . I mean I'm not all that familiar with Slavic culture , but as a kid I hung out a good bit at a Lithuanian social club with my friends and I must say that the cultural events/traditions that were hosted there were anything but bland .

Of course I imagine there is a lot of truth to the statement of Eastern Europeans keeping a lower profile than other groups due to their history .
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Old 08-18-2017, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Sweet Home...CHICAGO
3,329 posts, read 3,992,278 times
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While it is true they may not be represented in mainstream pop culture, I guess it depends on where you live and whether or not your are exposed to them. I live in Chicago and they are highly visible here. I interact with them in public, I work with tons of them, they are my neighbors. Even my landlady is Eastern European.
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Old 08-18-2017, 09:55 PM
 
1,290 posts, read 1,199,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene Chode View Post
What's strange is that most Italian immigration occurred during the same time period , yet Italian Americans seem to identify more with their heritage than their Eastern European counterparts . I've always found that strange since most Italian immigrants weren't persecuted back home , though I suppose American society might have been more welcoming towards Eastern European immigrants than Italians .
Old Polish neighborhoods in Buffalo remained stable and intact for over 100 years, from the 1870s thru at least the 1970s. (In that same timeframe the primary Italian neighborhoods moved from the Lower West Side, to the West Side, to the North Side.) I have cousins whose grandparents immigrated at the turn of the 20th century, yet whose first language learned in the home was Polish as late as the 1960s. Polish newspapers still exist, the old Broadway Market still exists, and many Polish-American holidays are celebrated today. Polish heritage is generally only celebrated and shared among other Poles, as the larger community don't seem much interested. Just because you don't see it doesn't mean its not there. If anything, Poles have been slow to assimilate within the US compared to many other cultures.
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Old 08-19-2017, 11:23 AM
 
56,511 posts, read 80,803,243 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RocketSci View Post
Old Polish neighborhoods in Buffalo remained stable and intact for over 100 years, from the 1870s thru at least the 1970s. (In that same timeframe the primary Italian neighborhoods moved from the Lower West Side, to the West Side, to the North Side.) I have cousins whose grandparents immigrated at the turn of the 20th century, yet whose first language learned in the home was Polish as late as the 1960s. Polish newspapers still exist, the old Broadway Market still exists, and many Polish-American holidays are celebrated today. Polish heritage is generally only celebrated and shared among other Poles, as the larger community don't seem much interested. Just because you don't see it doesn't mean its not there. If anything, Poles have been slow to assimilate within the US compared to many other cultures.
In Syracuse, many still live on the West Side around Park Avenue/Automobile Row(West Genesee Street) and around Transfiguration Catholic Church in the Eastwood neighborhood near the Lincoln Park/Hill neighborhood.

Ukrainians are nearby on the West Side in the Tipperary Hill neighborhood, with old timers/poorer folks in the Near West Side. Many have moved to the western suburbs and into Auburn, which has its Polish and Ukrainian communities concentrated in that city's NW section.

Russians(Jewish and non Jewish) tend to be in DeWitt and perhaps some on Syracuse's East Side. There are some Slavic churches in that general area.

There are also Polish and Ukrainian festivals in the city. Polish Scholarship Fund & Polish Fest | Welcome! Witamy!

http://www.stjohnbaptistucc.com/upda...lFlyer2017.pdf

There is a Polish Home and a Ukrainian Club as well: Dom Polski | Syracuse Polish Home

The Ukrainian National Home

So, as you mentioned, this is pretty common throughout NY State in cities big and small.
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Old 08-19-2017, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
5,655 posts, read 8,658,273 times
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I have many friends/neighbors/associates in Chicago who are Polish, Ukrainian, Lithuanian, Russian, Hungarian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Latvian, etc. - they are everywhere and have strong ties to their Eastern European families, culture, language, food, religion, etc. E.g. Many of their kids attend Polish school, attend Ukrainian church services, etc. All our public schools close for Casimer Pulaski day. There are Eastern European delis and street names all over the place. Eastern European are not invisible in my area.
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