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Old 08-19-2017, 06:31 PM
 
100 posts, read 62,571 times
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It looks like Eastern Europeans are fairly visible in the metro areas of the Great Lakes states , which makes sense I suppose , since the big cities of those states used to have large populations of Eastern Euros .

That said I'd like to ask about how much do young people of Eastern European descent in these metro areas identify with their heritage . In other words are people of Eastern European descent under 30 as attached to their heritage as those over 30 ? Can you see teenagers wearing Serbian eagle t shirts or tryzub pendants ? Do people under 30 who aren't immigrants or 2nd generation still speak their ancestral languages ?

I'm asking because it's always seemed to me that the only young people in the USA who are fairly attached to their heritage are immigrants or second generation .
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Old 08-20-2017, 11:03 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
2,481 posts, read 2,223,791 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene Chode View Post
I believe you but one would think ethnic issues between European ancestry groups are close to non existent now . It's interesting and strange to hear that they still exist . By the way have you noticed this type of thing only in Chicago ? Or does it crop up elsewhere as well ?
Chicago has been my primary experience with Eastern Europeans/Slavic people, so I don't know for sure. I was originally from the St. Louis area, but the Bosnian community hasn't necessarily permeated every level of society there like how Polish Americans have permeated every level of Chicago. Interestingly enough though, I believe part of the reason why St. Louis became the destination for Bosnian refugees was because there was a belief that the community there wouldn't have underlying ethnic issues with Bosnian refugees, so it would therefore be a more welcoming environment. Evidently that assumption was correct, because St. Louis has integrated the refugees very well.

As for old rivalries still existing in other ethnicities, Armenians everywhere are still pissed at the Turks. It doesn't matter where they live. Just look at the 100 anniversary commemoration of the Armenian Genocide back in 2015. Greek and Assyrian descended people who I've also met feel the same way in regards to the Turks, and it seems to transcend generations. Who can blame them though? Lands were lost and millions died.
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Old 08-20-2017, 01:49 PM
 
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I'll echo the Chicago statement.
Went to schools that celebrated Casmir Pulaski day (never knew that wasn't common until later). Drove on Pulaski road all the time.

Had classmates whose names all ended in ski or ki. Knew a few Serbians as well.

Never felt East Europe was underrepresented in that respect. But that just reflects the history of the city I'm from.
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Old 08-21-2017, 08:38 AM
 
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Originally Posted by TarHeelNick View Post
Read "Out of this Furnace" by Thomas Bell. The story of a "Husky" immigrant and 3 generations of his family from the 1880s-WWII in the Pittsburgh steel mills. Historical fiction (loosely based on the authors real ancestors) but gives an incredibly realistic and historically accurate account of what life was like for that ethnic group in that time period.

It was required reading in my History of American Industry class in college. One of the only "Required readings" I really truly enjoyed.
That book is, so far, the only textbook I sold that I bought back years later.

A talented writer should produce a sequel, carrying the generations of the Dobrejcak family foward to Trump.
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Old 08-21-2017, 08:40 AM
 
4,247 posts, read 9,712,249 times
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Originally Posted by Nedcone View Post
I'll echo the Chicago statement.
Went to schools that celebrated Casmir Pulaski day (never knew that wasn't common until later). Drove on Pulaski road all the time.

Had classmates whose names all ended in ski or ki. Knew a few Serbians as well.

Never felt East Europe was underrepresented in that respect. But that just reflects the history of the city I'm from.
Ironically, Pulaski VA seems pronounced more correctly locally (puh-LASS-kee) than Pulaski NY (po-las-SKY) is.
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Old 08-21-2017, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
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Originally Posted by Vanderbiltgrad View Post
Never met one Eastern European in all the years I lived in the South not one. I have met some Russian Jews and Russian Poles but the claim to be Jewish and not Eastern European. Even when I lived in Boston and NYC the Eastern european people did not have a lot of pride in their nationality so I bonded better with the Italians and Irish who were more outgoing.
I know a woman who's half Polish who went to Clemson. My cousin is half Polish and has lived in Georgia for many years.
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Old 08-21-2017, 03:45 PM
 
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I am from Texas..My grandmother is Eastern European(Czech).We grew up eating Kolaches and klobasneks.Her family were Roman Catholics but they never went but their funerals were at the Catholic church.I say i am the most in touch with my Eastern European heritage out of my generation in my family ...i like polka I took a DNA test and i was way less Slavic than I thought.I also had different Eastern European nationalities show up in my test.It seems like there are a lot of Eastern European villains in movies and books and stuff..People think my last name is Russian but it aint.I dont really indentify all that strongly with my Eastern European heritage....I identify more with my Northern and Western European roots.Were all euromutts now in my family.
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Old 08-21-2017, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,929 posts, read 2,213,027 times
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a few things that are part of mainstream American culture that comes from Eastern Europe

Vampire
Vodka
Robot

Famous Eastern Europeans in America
Nikola Tesla: Serbian
Sergey Brin: Russian/Jew
Igor Sikorsky: Ukrainian/Russian
Mila Kunis: Ukrainian/Russian/Jew
Milla Jovovich: Ukrainian/Russian/Serbian
Kim Kardashian: Armenian
George Soros: Hungarian
Jen Psaki: Greek/Polish
Bernie Sanders: Polish/Jew

Here are a bunch more
Russian Americans
Polish Americans
Ukrainian American
Serbian American
Armenian Americans
Czech Americans
Romanian American
Lithuanian American
Latvian American
Estonian American
Hungarian American
Georgian American
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Old 08-21-2017, 07:44 PM
 
17,662 posts, read 4,062,179 times
Reputation: 5587
Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
a few things that are part of mainstream American culture that comes from Eastern Europe

Vampire
Vodka
Robot

Famous Eastern Europeans in America
Nikola Tesla: Serbian
Sergey Brin: Russian/Jew
Igor Sikorsky: Ukrainian/Russian
Mila Kunis: Ukrainian/Russian/Jew
Milla Jovovich: Ukrainian/Russian/Serbian
Kim Kardashian: Armenian
George Soros: Hungarian
Jen Psaki: Greek/Polish
Bernie Sanders: Polish/Jew

Here are a bunch more
Russian Americans
Polish Americans
Ukrainian American
Serbian American
Armenian Americans
Czech Americans
Romanian American
Lithuanian American
Latvian American
Estonian American
Hungarian American
Georgian American
I guess the original vampire characters like Dracula in enertainment and pop culture were mostly Eastern European come to think of it.

Last edited by C24L; 08-21-2017 at 08:15 PM..
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Old 08-22-2017, 05:26 AM
 
1,593 posts, read 832,249 times
Reputation: 1220
There are towns in New England like Webster, Three Rivers, Chicopee, I'm half Polish and even I'm like there's a lot of Polish people here. There's more than one Polish club and they hate the other Polish club they don't hang out at. And those people are my relatives.
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