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Old 08-22-2017, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
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I am 7% Eastern European and 5% European Jewish, mostly from my Paternal Grandmother, but we are out there.
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Old 08-22-2017, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Nashville TN, Cincinnati, OH
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Never met any of them in the South, I knew a lot of Russian and Polish Jews when I lived in NYC but most of them identified with Judaism as their ethnicity.
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Old 08-22-2017, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, NC, formerly DC and Phila
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There was always a decent sized Polish community in and around Philadelphia. And more recently there is a good-sized Russian community, too.
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Old 08-22-2017, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vanderbiltgrad View Post
Never met any of them in the South, I knew a lot of Russian and Polish Jews when I lived in NYC but most of them identified with Judaism as their ethnicity.
From what I hear Russian Jews moved to NY, Christian Russians moved to California. Also there were several waves of Russians, the first wave happened in the mid to late 1800s with Jews fleeing the pogroms and persecution set up by Alexander III, then the second wave happened during the Revolution with a lot of loyalists and aristocrats fleeing Russia/Soviet Union. These people were of higher class and many of them didn't even know how to speak Russian, most spoke French, on top of that with the Soviet Union now in power they were very anti communist and to not become suspicious of being communist spies they abandoned their Russian culture. A third wave came in the 1980s during the perestroika, people were allowed to emigrate from the soviet union for religious reasons, so most of them were Jews. and then a 4th wave happened after the fall of the soviet union in the 90s, most of these were generic ethnic Russians who couldn't find economic opportunities back home.
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Old 08-22-2017, 05:09 PM
 
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I ran into some Russians when I was in Galveston on a vacation a long time ago.
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Old 08-23-2017, 07:35 AM
 
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Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
From what I hear Russian Jews moved to NY, Christian Russians moved to California. Also there were several waves of Russians, the first wave happened in the mid to late 1800s with Jews fleeing the pogroms and persecution set up by Alexander III, then the second wave happened during the Revolution with a lot of loyalists and aristocrats fleeing Russia/Soviet Union. These people were of higher class and many of them didn't even know how to speak Russian, most spoke French, on top of that with the Soviet Union now in power they were very anti communist and to not become suspicious of being communist spies they abandoned their Russian culture. A third wave came in the 1980s during the perestroika, people were allowed to emigrate from the soviet union for religious reasons, so most of them were Jews. and then a 4th wave happened after the fall of the soviet union in the 90s, most of these were generic ethnic Russians who couldn't find economic opportunities back home.
Orthodox Christianity in USA sees some weird convergences.

1/4 of my family was "Greek Catholic" in the old country (present-day Slovakia). My grandmother was baptized in a Greek Catholic congregation in upstate NY. The congregation re-converted to Orthodox (that happened to several in upstate NY, apparently in reaction to a feud with the Latin-rite Catholic hierarchy in early 20th century). Some of my second cousins from the then-declining rust-belt NY town wound up moving to Alaska in the 1970's pipeline boom, where they're in Orthodox congregations dating from Russian colonialism.

Last year in Harrisburg PA, the Orthodox church had a food festival - featuring pierogi, halushki - and injera, as in a small city some Ethiopian Orthodox rejoined their distant brethren.
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Old 08-23-2017, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
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My parents are Russian immigrants and I have yet to meet a Russian of the Orthodox faith, most people are Babtists, Pentecostal, Charasmatic, and a few Jehovah Witness. Russian Orthodox people exist, but I don't think they make up a large portion of Russian population in the US.
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Old 08-23-2017, 08:55 AM
 
4,247 posts, read 9,710,646 times
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Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
My parents are Russian immigrants and I have yet to meet a Russian of the Orthodox faith, most people are Babtists, Pentecostal, Charasmatic, and a few Jehovah Witness. Russian Orthodox people exist, but I don't think they make up a large portion of Russian population in the US.
Naturally, the more marginalized groups are more likely to emigrate from the "old country."

Returning to the OP, a "Hunky" is rarely a Magyar Hungarian. Hungarians were in charge of a much larger polity from 1867-1918 than they are today, lording it over various Slovaks, Rusyn, Croats, Serbs, etc. whose future largely was confined to their villages or being drafted into the imperial and royal army to fight their Slav Brothers.

So from the Russian Empire and Soviet Union, those in charge (whether Orthodox under the Czars, or Communist) really didn't want various Jews, Protestants, etc. so the way out for these folks was emigration too. Some particularly devout Orthodox did leave during Soviet days, to communities surrounding such locales as http://www.jordanville.org/
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