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Old 10-06-2012, 10:44 PM
 
567 posts, read 911,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by julian17033 View Post
Nowhere in the west have I seen what is considered normal row home districts here in the east.
San Francisco is famous for its row houses.
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Old 10-08-2012, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Lehigh Valley, PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MetalLord View Post
San Francisco is famous for its row houses.

Not the same type of architecture as the typical eastern seaboard rowhouse.
Housing like your comparing in San Francisco are ball parkish but are built in a larger square foot design and are not as densely packed as what you see in neighborhoods in the northeast and mid Atlantic cities.
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Old 10-08-2012, 04:05 PM
 
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To be fair, california (specifically san fran and sacramento) have fairly old archectiture similar to the east coast in some ways. It looks newer but its still not that new, a lot of the old buildings there look like colonial revival style. Los angeles even has old buildings that would "fit in" on the east coast. California was one of the first inhabited states of the west so it has some of the oldest archeticture of the area. Texas also has some old architecture but not much.

Places like arizona, Nevada and Utah are especially new states it terms of history, many did not reach 1 million people until the 1950's if not later. A lot of their "old architecture" were built in the early 1900's and no earlier. Those places are truly modern and only modern, with most old buildings being colonial revival or a copy off of something old. There are probably a few places down there that are truly old but not as many as the midwest or northeast.
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Old 10-08-2012, 04:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Not the same type of architecture as the typical eastern seaboard rowhouse.
Housing like your comparing in San Francisco are ball parkish but are built in a larger square foot design and are not as densely packed as what you see in neighborhoods in the northeast and mid Atlantic cities.
Explain why san francisco is denser then most cities on the east coast, 17,000 ppl per sq.mile compared to phiadelphia's 11,000 or boston's 13,000. San franciscan houses are just as dense as any city on the east coast
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Old 10-08-2012, 04:18 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
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Contrary to what some folks think they know, Houston and Dallas are overwhelmingly brick, like the rest of the South and Midwest. There's really nothing western about the architecture in most of populated Texas. Over the past two decades or so, there has been an invading trend of this faux-Spanish architecture here, but it's nothing like the real thing.
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Old 10-08-2012, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Lehigh Valley, PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amercity View Post
Explain why san francisco is denser then most cities on the east coast, 17,000 ppl per sq.mile compared to phiadelphia's 11,000 or boston's 13,000. San franciscan houses are just as dense as any city on the east coast

This is contributed to more people per unit within San fran. versus the smaller yet more numerous row home that is more densely packed within the confines of the average city block of the typical east coast city.

San Francisco is a unique city unto itself and holds somewhat similar architecture in some neighborhoods to what one would find on the eastern seaboard.

San Francisco is not the east coast and has little in common concerning most everything one finds as typical east coast.
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