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Old 03-13-2008, 06:24 PM
 
Location: san diego, Los angeles
102 posts, read 429,111 times
Reputation: 60

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Has anyone noticed that all cities that are in the east and south all have a certin kind of architecture, for example in the east and south and some mid- west cities you find dense and wholesome buildings and have a kind of stoney look to them like a old cathedral or like some builindings in New York but when you come to the west or south west areas such as Houston, Dallas, Los angeles, san diego, seattle, las vegas etc. there buildings arn't stoney are aged looking there all steel and glass and there not dense enough, what is the deal? well can anyone answer my question?
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Old 03-13-2008, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Southern California
3,455 posts, read 7,306,202 times
Reputation: 1410
Well you almost answered your own question there. "old catherderal buildings"

Much of the west and southwest is VERY new compared to the eastern part of the country.
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Old 03-13-2008, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Mission Viejo, CA
2,498 posts, read 10,294,512 times
Reputation: 1598
Just look a little into history.
California for example is such a young state. Today there are over 38 million people, but a little over 100 years ago, the state was empty. In the 1900 census, California had only 1,485,053 people living in it. That is really small for the third largest state in land area!

Los Angeles County had only 170, 298 residents in 1900 and today it is the largest county in population in the USA. It just shows how much the area has expanded over the last one hundred years. New York City alone had more people than all of California in 1900 with just under 3.5 million people, so you can see the reason sky scrappers here are all glass and steel and the reason homes are all relatively new is that most of the construction in the West didn't happen until the 1950's, where the other regions had been big cities for hundreds of years.

Here, two populations lists:
http://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/ca190090.txt

http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0922422.html
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Old 03-13-2008, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,055,318 times
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Architecture in Arizona and Southern California looks a lot different than it does in Texas and the South. Out west most buildings have some form of stucco and Spanish-tiled rooftops. Each region of our country has different styled architecture and I think that is a good thing.
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Old 03-14-2008, 01:41 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
263 posts, read 733,189 times
Reputation: 106
You forget the seismic history of areas in California. Structures built elsewhere cannot be considered for construction in California because of the higher standards. Structures also don't have to be physically dense because it just doesn't get that cold.
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Old 03-14-2008, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
36 posts, read 113,366 times
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Texas (Houston, San Antonio, Austin, El Paso) have A LOT of Spanish design, stucco, tile roofing. Houston has large subdivisions with nothing but Spanish Mediterrean designs. It also seems to be the new trend. However, I think they use a faux-stucco
due to the humidity.
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Old 03-14-2008, 08:44 AM
 
127 posts, read 124,026 times
Reputation: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by minneahouston View Post
Texas (Houston, San Antonio, Austin, El Paso) have A LOT of Spanish design, stucco, tile roofing. Houston has large subdivisions with nothing but Spanish Mediterrean designs. It also seems to be the new trend. However, I think they use a faux-stucco
due to the humidity.
Houston is not southwest, but that's a whole different post. There are actually a lot of different influences in Houston, but Spanish influence is high up there,
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Old 03-14-2008, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 69,444,268 times
Reputation: 10117
Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Architecture in Arizona and Southern California looks a lot different than it does in Texas and the South. Out west most buildings have some form of stucco and Spanish-tiled rooftops. Each region of our country has different styled architecture and I think that is a good thing.
Architecture is also influenced by local materials and weather. Adobe, etc, was used by the Spanish in the 1500s in the southwest, as it was relatively easy to build and maintain, etc. The tiled roofs in AZ and CA, etc, are used to deflect heat in the hottest region of the country, or so Ive been told. Youll find alot of oak and pine in many states too, which they use extensively, etc, etc.
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Old 03-14-2008, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
12,582 posts, read 48,911,711 times
Reputation: 14250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
Architecture is also influenced by local materials and weather. Adobe, etc, was used by the Spanish in the 1500s in the southwest, as it was relatively easy to build and maintain, etc. The tiled roofs in AZ and CA, etc, are used to deflect heat in the hottest region of the country, or so Ive been told. Youll find alot of oak and pine in many states too, which they use extensively, etc, etc.
That's hitting the nail on the head!
Architecture is influenced by local materials and weather! When the eastern seaboard was being developed- the most prominent building material available was timber. As growth spand westward timber was not as prevalent so other materials were being used. And there were other influences from other cultures.
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Old 08-19-2009, 03:50 PM
 
167 posts, read 381,371 times
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the west, specifically California, Arizona, and New Mexico has more of spanish influence than english influence. I know some buildings in south florida may be confused for buildings in CA but for the rest of the east its totally different.
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