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Old 08-23-2017, 08:47 PM
 
161 posts, read 182,007 times
Reputation: 128
Fayetteville NC's downtown is a lot smaller than you'd expect for a city over 200k. It's because the majority of the employment is at fort bragg. That said the downtown is quaint and historic. Just lacking the size and many office buildings.
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Old 08-23-2017, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,145 posts, read 2,833,533 times
Reputation: 2858
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
What is this back-to-the-burbs trend you speak of? I iive in the US where it generally works in the opposite after going that way for some decades.
Come visit the Eastern Rustbelt.
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Old 08-23-2017, 11:32 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,311 posts, read 3,522,452 times
Reputation: 4510
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
Come visit the Eastern Rustbelt.
I'm sorry to hear this, bluecarebear.

I haven't been to Pennsylvania, Ohio or Michigan in about 5 years so I have no idea what's happening there.

I was recently in coastal New England from Boston up to Maine, and didn't see any evidence of this. Their economy is humming though, and most old industrial buildings we saw have been re-purposed, even in the smaller towns.

The opposite of stagnation is happening in Atlanta, though. After suffering from a large population loss between the 70's to the early 90's, the City is booming on an unbelievable level. I'm guessing it will pass its peak population of 496,000 in the next Census. Most of the close-in suburbs are urbanizing, and prices are increasing everywhere in the core Metro area.

Growth is happening in the exurbs for the first time in years, but most people seem to want to be closer in.
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Old 08-24-2017, 05:05 AM
 
9,399 posts, read 9,560,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
What is this back-to-the-burbs trend you speak of? I iive in the US where it generally works in the opposite after going that way for some decades.
Generally places like Detroit, St Louis, Chicago and Bufffalo have booming central areas (or in Buffalo and Chicagos case a whole quadrant). It have large swaths of plummeting populations to offset any gain.
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Old 08-24-2017, 09:25 AM
 
10 posts, read 4,585 times
Reputation: 26
I definitely wouldn't describe what's happening in places like Columbus and Cleveland as a "back to the suburbs" movement. Now the suburbs, Columbus especially, have been seeing growth and there is still a significant movement of people to these areas like there always has been.

But it has been complimented by a reinvestment in the urban cores of these cities that only appears to be accelerating. Downtown Cleveland has been growing at an impressive rate for a while now, and it doesn't appear to be slowing down with new projects like nuCLEus, Flats East Bank phase 3, along with other projects constantly being announced.

The Short North in Columbus has a new crane pop up every few blocks for development projects. Same with the area around Ohio State. These are some of the hottest neighborhoods in the metro area, and there are other inner city neighborhoods beginning to gain momentum like Franklinton and Old Town East. Even Downtown, which, while I don't know if I'd call it non-functional I'd definitely call it underwhelming compared to other cities its size, has at least a dozen projects underway and is in the process of a transformation.

What is going on in the urban cores of these cities is really quite stunning. I don't think we should look at our cities with an Urban core vs. Suburban mindset. Suburban areas should compliment Urban ones and vice versa. Of course poorly planned sprawl should be avoided, but healthy growth throughout the metro, which compliments a variety of lifestyle choices, should be the goal IMO, not an 'us vs them' mindset.
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Old 08-24-2017, 09:28 AM
 
29,949 posts, read 27,441,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
The Rust Belt city downtowns are all supported by outstanding suburbs. The Back-to-the-Burbs trend will only continue to spread throughout the US as the rich/poor inner cities continue to decline.
When were the 'burbs ever abandoned to begin with?
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Old 08-29-2017, 08:25 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,826 posts, read 12,344,313 times
Reputation: 4783
Colorado Springs doesn't feel like it has a true downtown.

Downtown Las Vegas is growing but is still overshadowed by the Strip and other parts of the metro area.
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Old 09-04-2017, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, California
459 posts, read 342,722 times
Reputation: 411
Huntsville, Alabama.
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Old 09-05-2017, 03:11 AM
 
4,407 posts, read 4,615,859 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beer1 View Post
Fresno
and Sacramento.
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Old 09-05-2017, 06:58 AM
BMI
 
Location: Ontario
7,266 posts, read 4,519,143 times
Reputation: 5631
Detroit?
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