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Old 08-30-2017, 06:16 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
1,251 posts, read 644,247 times
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Cleveland has some interesting suburbs like Shaker Hts., Beachwood, Cleveland Hts., Lyndhurst, Twinsburg and Pepper Pike.
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Old 08-30-2017, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,926 posts, read 6,911,653 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
The "Old Town" elegant colonial section of Alexandria, VA. Technically it's an inner-suburb of Washington DC, although it's actually older than Washington, dating from the 1750s. Sometimes it's called "Georgetown with a southern twist."

Sausalito, CA, nestled in a cove near the Golden Gate Bridge

Pasadena, CA

Coronado, CA, on San Diego Bay

LaJolla, CA, near San Diego

Ellicott City, just outside of Baltimore, MD, resembles more of a mountain town in a gorge surrounded by hills. The nation's first railroad was there.

elegant, colonial New Castle, next to Wilmington, Del.

Scottsdale, next to Phoenix, AZ.

Coral Gables, next to Miami, FL
La Jolla officially is a neighborhood within the San Diego city limits rather than a separate town or city
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Old 09-02-2017, 01:03 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,038 posts, read 102,742,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
Cambridge and Somerville are separate cities, not suburbs. I would consider them part of the overall urban area in the Boston metro, not the suburbs. I'm not familiar enough with some of the other cities mentioned here to know whether the suggestions in those locations are more accurately defined as urban rather than suburban.

Here in Denver, the city itself is pretty sprawling, with many residential districts - my neighborhood is a planned urban community on the site of the old airport and it's part of the city, with city schools and services, but it's also somewhat suburban in nature - not completely so, there is public transportation, mostly single family homes but they are very close together, no big yards, so it's kind of a mix, and other parts are similar. You have go a bit of ways out to get to the real suburbs (which are pretty damn uninteresting IMO)
Actually, I think many of the Denver suburbs are interesting. Virtually all of them except Castle Rock, which pulled out of the RTD, have public transportation. Most homes are on small-ish lots, larger than those in Stapleton yes, but not huge. 1/4 acre (~10,000 sf) is considered very large in most of the Denver burbs. It's mostly single family homes but there is plenty of multi-family housing as well.

Because Denver is a separate city-county, all of the burbs are in different counties. Several of them are the county seat for their county, e.g. Boulder, Boulder County; Brighton, Adams County; Littleton, Arapahoe County; Castle Rock, Douglas County; Golden, Jefferson County. Boulder is both a suburb and an independent city. Lots of cross-traffic between it and Denver/other Denver burbs. Boulder is certainly an "interesting" place. Golden is also interesting with Colorado School of Mines and the Coors brewery. Littleton has a nice downtown with lots of restaurants, not much else as is the case with many suburban downtowns. Louisville, Lafayette and Superior are old coal mining towns. L&L both have downtowns that are fairly active. Brighton is not my cup of tea, but has a downtown. Westminster and Broomfield have a lot of amenities for the residents, lots of parkland, especially Westminster.
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Old 09-02-2017, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
8,702 posts, read 11,955,182 times
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Practically every major city has interesting suburbs or satellite cities:

NYC: Jersey City, Hoboken, White Plains, etc.
LA: Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, Long Beach, etc.
San Francisco: Palo Alto, Berkley, Oakland, etc.
Miami: Miami Beach, Fort Lauderdale, Palm Beach, etc.
Boston: Cambridge, Brookline, Somerville, etc.
Washington DC: Arlington, Alexandria, Rosslyn, etc.
Philadelphia: Main Line, Media, West Chester, Atlantic City, etc.
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Old 09-02-2017, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
8,702 posts, read 11,955,182 times
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Philadelphia

I really didn't start getting into everything the Philadelphia Region has to offer until recently. The sheer amount of interesting, urban, walkable towns throughout the Philadelphia Region is really awesome. Not only do you have dozens of walkable, urban neighborhoods in the city of Philadelphia itself, but every surrounding county in the MSA and CSA offer walkable towns and small cities as well.

MSA only:

Montgomery County, PA: Ardmore, Ambler, Conshohocken, Hatboro, Jenkintown, Lansdale, Narberth, Pottstown, Norristown, Bryn Mawr, Glenside and King of Prussia. Bala Cynwyd and Royersford are up and coming and building up.

Delaware County, PA: Lansdowne, Media, Wayne and Upper Darby. Chester is very rundown but starting to turn around.

Chester County, PA: West Chester, Kennett Square, Phoenixville, and Oxford. Coatesville is rundown but starting to turn around.

Bucks County, PA: Bristol, Doylestown, New Hope, New Hope and Quakertown.

New Castle County, DE: Wilmington, Newark and New Castle.

Camden County, NJ: Collingswood, Haddonfield and Haddon Heights. Camden is very rundown, but has started to turn around and build up. Even Cherry Hill and Voorhees have started building walkable communities. Westmont is also building up and becoming a walkable community.

Burlington County, NJ: Burlington, Mount Holly, Moorestown, Bordentown, Riverside and Maple Shade

Gloucester County, NJ: Glassboro, Pitman and Woodbury
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Old 09-02-2017, 07:52 PM
Status: "Bye Bye Warriors" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: where the good looking people are
3,571 posts, read 2,596,276 times
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LA by far.

Suburbs on the coast and in the hills are amazing.
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Old 09-03-2017, 09:01 PM
 
9,408 posts, read 9,569,816 times
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I think there are very few cities the amount of nationally recognized suburbs as Boston; Salem, Lexington, Concord, Plymouth, Gloucester, Portsmouth, and Cambridge and to a lesser extent Lowell, Wellesley, Lawrence, and Quincy have national profiles, which makes the Suburbs of Greater Boston interesting.

Buffalo is no slouch, Orchard Park, Amherst and Niagara Falls.
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Old 09-03-2017, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,926 posts, read 6,911,653 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
I think there are very few cities the amount of nationally recognized suburbs as Boston; Salem, Lexington, Concord, Plymouth, Gloucester, Portsmouth, and Cambridge and to a lesser extent Lowell, Wellesley, Lawrence, and Quincy have national profiles, which makes the Suburbs of Greater Boston interesting.

Buffalo is no slouch, Orchard Park, Amherst and Niagara Falls.
Surprised you didn't mention Somerville, Holbrook, Medford, Malden, Dedham, or Brookline
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Old 09-04-2017, 08:40 AM
 
9,408 posts, read 9,569,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
Surprised you didn't mention Somerville, Holbrook, Medford, Malden, Dedham, or Brookline
As nice as those towns are they don't have the sort of clout that those other towns do.
All of the town I mentioned are towns that have a distinct history and culture. So much so that most of them end up getting mentioned in History Classes across the country.
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Old 09-04-2017, 08:53 AM
 
3,877 posts, read 5,946,403 times
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As said before Chicago has some interesting and wonderful suburbs. Besides Evanston and Oak Park, some other ones are Riverside, Highland Park, Hinsdale, Wheaton and Glen Ellyn, Wilmette, Lake Forest, most of the north shore suburbs....I am not saying they are all interesting, but they are beautiful and wonderful places to live.
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