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Old 09-04-2017, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Chicago
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San Fran and its suburbs.
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Old 09-05-2017, 08:35 AM
 
Location: NY, NY
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Almost any large city will have interesting suburbs. Off the top of my head pop Boston, NYC, Philly, DC, Chicago, Detroit, LA, San Fran, Seattle. All these cities have really cool suburbs.


Personal favorite is San Francisco, especially Marin County.
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Old 09-05-2017, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Jackson, Mississippi
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Default Northeastern Megalopolis may have the most interesting suburbs

I would say Boston, NYC, Philly, and maybe D.C. have the most interesting suburbs.

I recently visited New York, and I found Westchester county to be quite a bizarre agglomeration of suburbs and rural areas mixed very tightly, and I really was impressed with nearby downtown Stamford, from which we took the commuter train into Manhattan's Grand Central Terminal.

Other close honorable mentions would be:

Chicago (Evanston, Naperville, Waukegan)

Seattle; (Bellevue, Everett)

San Francisco; (San Mateo, Berkeley, Mountain View)

Los Angeles (Venice Beach, Santa Barbara, etc.)
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Old 09-05-2017, 06:22 PM
 
7,694 posts, read 4,551,558 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
I think there are very few cities the amount of nationally recognized suburbs as Boston; Salem, Lexington, Concord, Plymouth, Gloucester, Portsmouth, and Cambridge and to a lesser extent Lowell, Wellesley, Lawrence, and Quincy have national profiles, which makes the Suburbs of Greater Boston interesting.

Buffalo is no slouch, Orchard Park, Amherst and Niagara Falls.
There are very few people who consider Salem a Boston suburb, and no one considers Plymouth one. When you go to Waltham, you're going to the suburbs. When you go to Plymouth, you're going out of town.
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Old 09-05-2017, 06:24 PM
 
Location: somewhere flat
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Probably Boston.
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Old 09-05-2017, 06:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
There are very few people who consider Salem a Boston suburb, and no one considers Plymouth one. When you go to Waltham, you're going to the suburbs. When you go to Plymouth, you're going out of town.
Outside of SSU there really isn't a huge employment base in Salem.

Plymouth is as much as suburb as most of the places on the other lists.
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Old 09-05-2017, 06:48 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Outside of SSU there really isn't a huge employment base in Salem.

Plymouth is as much as suburb as most of the places on the other lists.
Debatable. Plymouth has a huge land area and still has plenty of semi rural areas and also Myles Standish SF. My father has a summer cottage on one of the kettle ponds on a dirt road that feels worlds away from Boston and its a lot more laid back than any suburban area. However Plymouth is also very development friendly, so areas like Pine Hills off Route 3 feel very much in the suburban web.

Technically Salem is inside 128, so yeah its in the burbs more or less. But much of the North Shore has a vibe that doesn't feel quite as suburban. When I lived in Salem I didn't feel a great need to ride the train into Boston, because I had so much to do within walking distance there. There's a linear urban belt from Revere, Lynn, Salem, on into parts of Beverly with a lot more of a city feel than say...Burlington or Needham. To me Metro West is all mostly suburban vibe like Natick and Framingham and that whole route 9 corridor out to Worcester are very retail and cul de sac burbs vibe.

Last edited by Desert_SW_77; 09-05-2017 at 07:08 PM..
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Old 09-05-2017, 07:21 PM
 
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For me it comes down to how easily you could go somewhere to shop or eat at a restaurant. Boston to Plymouth is a day-trip. You aren't going to drive from one to the other, eat a meal and drive back. You're going to spend the whole day, or maybe even spend the night.
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Old 09-06-2017, 08:40 AM
 
8,497 posts, read 7,628,913 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
There are very few people who consider Salem a Boston suburb, and no one considers Plymouth one. When you go to Waltham, you're going to the suburbs. When you go to Plymouth, you're going out of town.
Plymouth is most definitely a suburb. Waltham is borderline. Yes it's technically a suburb, but it's also a city in itself. It's quite urban in parts. Generally, the "burbs" start at 128.
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Old 09-06-2017, 09:05 AM
 
56,511 posts, read 80,803,243 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
I think there are very few cities the amount of nationally recognized suburbs as Boston; Salem, Lexington, Concord, Plymouth, Gloucester, Portsmouth, and Cambridge and to a lesser extent Lowell, Wellesley, Lawrence, and Quincy have national profiles, which makes the Suburbs of Greater Boston interesting.

Buffalo is no slouch, Orchard Park, Amherst and Niagara Falls.
Niagara Falls is more of a satellite city in that metro. I'd say that villages like Williamsville, East Aurora, Hamburg, Kenmore and Lancaster would be good fits. Lewiston outside of Niagara Falls is another one.
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