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Old 10-02-2009, 02:02 PM
 
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I have travelled the States extensively, and the answer is nowhere that I have been.
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Old 10-02-2009, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paparaciii View Post
As we all know, there are many places in U.S. where Spanish, Portuguese, Russian, Italian, Greek and other languages are spoken.
So I'm wondering, is there any town/neighborhood in the U.S. where Brits are the majority of population and British English is most commonly spoken language?

Cheers!
Go to Maine. I swear they all sound like they're from Somerset there
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Old 10-02-2009, 05:25 PM
 
Location: where my heart is
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My Grandpa was conceived in England (Norwich) and Great-Grandma was PG with him (7 months)when they came over on the boat to America (1886). I found this out from many years of genealogy. Anyway, as I kid I always thought he talked funny (raised by British born parents in NYC) and he used to call America "the colonies". I did not know anyone who spoke like him in NY when I was a kid.
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Old 10-02-2009, 05:36 PM
 
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Other than the enclave mentioned above, in FL, no.

Although, what is cool is that we Americans are, in general, a living museum of the 17th century English spoken by country folk in the Midlands. LOL!
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Old 10-04-2009, 10:20 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
I think the old upper-class Connecticut and Massachusetts accents, like the one associated to Katherine Hepburn, is sometimes seen as a tad British. I think it might've even been an intentional attempt by educated Brahmins to sound British. However I believe that accent is in decline. They did have a video of it on that connected to that youtube deal.


YouTube - Boston Brahmin
Well I don't think they tried to sound British. After all, blue collar accents in the Northeast like the typical Boston and NY accents are still non-rhotic.

The thing is the British-sounding, non-rhotic, upper class accent from the NE was the standard educated accent in the US up to WWII. But after WWII, Midwestern accent (what we know call "neutral" American accent) took over as the neutral educated accent, so the upper classes in the NE increasingly tended to adopt it and the non-rhotic accnets were relegated to the blue-collar populations of cities like Boston or NYC.
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Old 09-27-2013, 05:11 PM
 
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Originally Posted by High Springs Gator View Post
The closest true English accent to that of the people of Tangier Island is undoubtably "Cornish" from the County of Cornwall on the furthest westerley point of southern England.
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Old 09-29-2013, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Hollywood, CA
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There's also a British type accent from the outer banks of North Carolina called the Ocracoke Brogue. It's called one of the last relatives of Elizabethian English.


Ocracoke Brogue excerpt - YouTube
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Old 10-03-2013, 11:14 AM
 
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This particular US/English accent has a definate Somerset slant.
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