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Old 03-20-2019, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
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When automation takes over, and if we decide on UBI (universal basic income) as a solution. Then I think a lot of people will start moving to small towns where cost of living is considerably cheaper.
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Old 03-20-2019, 12:23 PM
 
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Maybe. Things like this tend to have an ebb and flow to them. As others have stated in this thread, once you're retired and no longer need to live near a major employment center, moving to a smaller town to retire in sounds more attractive.

And since the population is getting older, I can see a return to the small town.
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Old 03-20-2019, 12:29 PM
 
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Once hydroponic farming and lab grown meat take off, it's game over for the economy in rural America. Touristy areas or places near major metropolitan areas will continue to do well, but the rest may decline significantly.
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Old 03-20-2019, 01:14 PM
 
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A small town with a healthy traditional core might be a nice place to retire to. But outside touristy places those towns seem rare.
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Old 03-20-2019, 01:39 PM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
1,231 posts, read 512,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bubb Rubb View Post
Maybe. Things like this tend to have an ebb and flow to them. As others have stated in this thread, once you're retired and no longer need to live near a major employment center, moving to a smaller town to retire in sounds more attractive.

And since the population is getting older, I can see a return to the small town.
Perhaps for a time early in retirement. As you age you need/want to be near good medical care. Itís a scary thought being hours from a real hospital if something goes wrong, or the constant driving long distance for appointments, assuming you still can drive. Even in a major metro small town living has its limitations. I have family in Seattle that are already making their exit plan off an island because this is gonna be around the corner shortly. Taking a ferry to the city for appointments and being airlifted out in an emergency doesnít sound too appealing to someone getting up there in age. Obviously someone will buy their property and take their place because itís a reasonable distance to the city, but I donít see rural small towns being a long term plan for most retirees.
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Old 03-20-2019, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Brew City
4,270 posts, read 2,525,383 times
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Originally Posted by Roanoke2 View Post
Most of the ghost towns in the west are former Cowboys towns from the old west. Many small towns are thriving out there. Fredonia AZ, Telluride CO, Elko NV, and Moscow ID just to name a few.
So touristy or college towns. Like I said, some small towns are thriving (which can be said for any region).

I could make a list of dying towns in the west too.

There are 23 counties in MT losing population.
https://www.hcn.org/articles/the-mon...lation-decline
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Old 03-20-2019, 04:19 PM
 
429 posts, read 176,520 times
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Originally Posted by TacoSoup View Post
Perhaps for a time early in retirement. As you age you need/want to be near good medical care. Itís a scary thought being hours from a real hospital if something goes wrong, or the constant driving long distance for appointments, assuming you still can drive. Even in a major metro small town living has its limitations. I have family in Seattle that are already making their exit plan off an island because this is gonna be around the corner shortly. Taking a ferry to the city for appointments and being airlifted out in an emergency doesnít sound too appealing to someone getting up there in age. Obviously someone will buy their property and take their place because itís a reasonable distance to the city, but I donít see rural small towns being a long term plan for most retirees.
Yeah, that makes sense. I know there are a bunch of older people who typically hate people generally, so I can see them move away from civilization but in terms of practicality, especially with obtaining medication, getting medical services, etc. the practical considerations win out.
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Old 03-21-2019, 12:09 AM
 
112 posts, read 42,634 times
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Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
When automation takes over, and if we decide on UBI (universal basic income) as a solution. Then I think a lot of people will start moving to small towns where cost of living is considerably cheaper.
I don't see that happening in my (or my children's) Lifetime.
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Old 03-21-2019, 01:07 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,605 posts, read 3,684,120 times
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Originally Posted by Drewjdeg View Post
Once hydroponic farming and lab grown meat take off, it's game over for the economy in rural America.
Yum. I look for the day when I can strap on my personal jetpack, that was promised so many years ago, and fly to my local market to buy fake eggs, fake milk, lab-grown meat, and a bunch of hydroponic veggies. There will be a Starbucks there with fake coffee.

In China, they are having to pay people to go out in the fields to pollinate crops because the natural pollinators, like honey bees, have disappeared. That will be cost prohibitive on a global scale. We keep using chemicals or harmful substances to "improve" and modernize the tasks that small towners and rural people did along with natural processes. We are moving away from practices and life-ways that were sustainable for a thousand years in favor of untried or fringe solutions.

Small towns with an economic anchor, like a college, military base, or prison, will survive even though they are not close to a large city. They become something of a company town.
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Old 03-21-2019, 01:19 AM
 
2,812 posts, read 1,148,360 times
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Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
Yum. I look for the day when I can strap on my personal jetpack, that was promised so many years ago, and fly to my local market to buy fake eggs, fake milk, lab-grown meat, and a bunch of hydroponic veggies. There will be a Starbucks there with fake coffee.

In China, they are having to pay people to go out in the fields to pollinate crops because the natural pollinators, like honey bees, have disappeared. That will be cost prohibitive on a global scale. We keep using chemicals or harmful substances to "improve" and modernize the tasks that small towners and rural people did along with natural processes. We are moving away from practices and life-ways that were sustainable for a thousand years in favor of untried or fringe solutions.

Small towns with an economic anchor, like a college, military base, or prison, will survive even though they are not close to a large city. They become something of a company town.
I understand your point, but hydroponic farming is a game changer. I live in the Wisconsin, which means our lettuce is shipped all the way from California or Mexico. But, nowadays I can go to the gas station and buy organic spinach grown an hour away with zero pesticides in a hydroponic farm. That's way less distance for my food to travel, and much less CO2. Much less water too than traditional agriculture.

Also, I don't really think you know what hydroponic farming is. It actually mimics natural processes.

http://www.ernessifarms.com

Last edited by Drewjdeg; 03-21-2019 at 01:29 AM..
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