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Old 03-21-2019, 05:07 AM
 
94 posts, read 30,848 times
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In the next 50 years I seriously doubt it. The reasons boil down to economic and sexual/romantic opportunity as well as having stimulating things to do. Unless small town America (or any country for that matter) provides good jobs for both genders, the ability to sleep with whomever you please without everyone knowing about it and interesting things to do then they are mostly doomed.
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Old 03-21-2019, 05:12 AM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
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Those that learn how to reinvent themselves for retirees will do ok, as long as a medical center is nearby.
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Old 03-21-2019, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,929 posts, read 2,211,473 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pavlov's Dog View Post
In the next 50 years I seriously doubt it. The reasons boil down to economic and sexual/romantic opportunity as well as having stimulating things to do. Unless small town America (or any country for that matter) provides good jobs for both genders, the ability to sleep with whomever you please without everyone knowing about it and interesting things to do then they are mostly doomed.
I think small towns are more appealing to stable families who are not interested in clubbing. people in their 20s are always going to be attracted to the excitement of the city, but I think a lot of people in their 30s - 60s would be interested in in a small town, the only problem is that there are not that many high paying jobs there.

Also something to think about is that these population sizes are all relative. For instance in 1850 the greater Boston area had 650,357 people with only 136,881 people within the city limits, yet back then Boston was considered a bustling major city, the 3rd largest in the US. However with those population figures it was about the size of modern day Syracuse(City: 143,378 | MSA: 662,577) , but I don't think people would think of Syracuse as bustling or major, at least not the way we think of the current 3rd city, Chicago. I think that if you build a city on a more human scale you can create a very attractive town that acts and looks much larger than the figures state.

Modcut: North America only

Last edited by JMT; 03-21-2019 at 06:57 PM..
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Old 03-21-2019, 06:43 PM
 
7,699 posts, read 4,554,568 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
I think small towns are more appealing to stable families who are not interested in clubbing. people in their 20s are always going to be attracted to the excitement of the city, but I think a lot of people in their 30s - 60s would be interested in in a small town, the only problem is that there are not that many high paying jobs there.

Also something to think about is that these population sizes are all relative. For instance in 1850 the greater Boston area had 650,357 people with only 136,881 people within the city limits, yet back then Boston was considered a bustling major city, the 3rd largest in the US. However with those population figures it was about the size of modern day Syracuse(City: 143,378 | MSA: 662,577) , but I don't think people would think of Syracuse as bustling or major, at least not the way we think of the current 3rd city, Chicago. I think that if you build a city on a more human scale you can create a very attractive town that acts and looks much larger than the figures state.

Modcut: North America only
I'm Always shocked when people think that clubbing and jobs are the only reason to live in the city. There are a host of amenities that you really only find in major metro areas, and the occasional college or resort town. Sometimes people just want choices.

Last edited by JMT; 03-21-2019 at 06:57 PM..
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Old 03-21-2019, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
I'm Always shocked when people think that clubbing and jobs are the only reason to live in the city. There are a host of amenities that you really only find in major metro areas, and the occasional college or resort town. Sometimes people just want choices.
True, but besides museums, theaters, orchestras, ballets, plays, sports stadiums, and other cultural amenities then there isn't a huge difference that a well developed town can't offer. Sure that might seem a lot, but to the average person who doesn't go to those kinds of things, then it's really not that big. For instance Victoria, BC, it only has 85,792 people in the city limits and 367,770 people in the metro area, yet it has a fairly large urban downtown that offers a wide verity of restaurants, shops, cafes etc.

https://www.google.com/maps/@48.4257...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@48.4223...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@48.4259...thumbfov%3D100

Sure it's a historic, touristy capital city, but that shouldn't stop other towns from trying to develop a similar urban downtown. Plus the urban bones come from a time when the city was considerably smaller, people back then were able to build large urban cities with few people, It's not really about total population size, it's about population density, it's density that brings the amenities, Victoria has a density of 11,411/sq mi. People who live in the suburbs will rarely come into the city for the amenities, instead choosing to go to the local strip mall, and drawing the amenities away and spreading them out. Amenities are best propped up when there is a large amount of people to draw from nearby. If more towns where developed as Victoria, I'm pretty sure towns would be looked at more favorably especially if they had a source of income to support them to live there, such as government jobs that capital cities bring.
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Old 03-23-2019, 10:46 AM
 
788 posts, read 1,050,991 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
I'm Always shocked when people think that clubbing and jobs are the only reason to live in the city. There are a host of amenities that you really only find in major metro areas, and the occasional college or resort town. Sometimes people just want choices.

Exactly. I live in a small town that's having growing pains. A lot of the area was farm land, but it's being sold to developers because farming isn't a profession that young people want as a career.

So a lot of young professional families are moving here because housing is a lot cheaper than it is in the nearby suburbs/cities.

It's a great town, but it seems like everyone works somewhere other than here - unless you run or work at the local stores/restaurants, etc.

A lot of the older residents are having a hard time adapting because they miss the town being small and rural. (South Lyon was the horse capital of Michigan) It was a big to-do a couple of years ago when Tim Horton's decided to build a franchise here. A lot of the newer residents were thrilled. A lot of the older residents, not so much.

We picked a house that was as close to "downtown" as you could get because we really didn't want to be in country. We like quick trips to the store and activities. We love our community, but it gets so frustrating when everything you want (big box stores, restaurants) or need (a hospital) is about 20 minutes away.

Some people really thrive in small towns, but others just don't.

My husband and I both miss living in a more suburban area because we like having choices. It was a huge deal when my town got their first Mediterranean restaurant about two years ago and just awful when the only decent BBQ place closed and the chef moved to downtown Detroit.

On the other hand, now that we've been here a while, we have a really tight-knit group of people we hang out with. We really feel like we are part of the community. It's nice to be missed if you don't show up for events that people just assume that you'll show up for.

Still, we miss having more choices readily available.
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Old 03-26-2019, 08:58 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,720,777 times
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Hydroponic farming may replace some conventional agriculture, but it is also not unlikely that hydroponic farms will be situated local to their market, thus in the smaller towns in the hinterlands of the larger cities across the country where real estate is becoming prohibitive to anything but commercial and residential zoning.

The key factor of hydroponic faming is that it doesn't have to be concentrated in California's Central Valley.

That said, hydroponic faming is far from the panacea some futurists seem to think it is. I think crop agriculture will become more dispersed and localized, but conventional soil farming will dominate as long as the population is so big, if for no other reason than infrastructural efficiency. Hydroponic farms are susceptible to evaporation and transpiration and must be conducted inside structures like greenhouses. The sheer acreage to support 350 million+ people in the US makes that unfeasable.
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Old 03-26-2019, 09:36 PM
 
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Another company based in East Aurora: https://www.moog.com
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moog_Inc.
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Old 03-26-2019, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,556 posts, read 17,535,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Hydroponic farming may replace some conventional agriculture, but it is also not unlikely that hydroponic farms will be situated local to their market, thus in the smaller towns in the hinterlands of the larger cities across the country where real estate is becoming prohibitive to anything but commercial and residential zoning.

The key factor of hydroponic faming is that it doesn't have to be concentrated in California's Central Valley.

That said, hydroponic faming is far from the panacea some futurists seem to think it is. I think crop agriculture will become more dispersed and localized, but conventional soil farming will dominate as long as the population is so big, if for no other reason than infrastructural efficiency. Hydroponic farms are susceptible to evaporation and transpiration and must be conducted inside structures like greenhouses. The sheer acreage to support 350 million+ people in the US makes that unfeasable.
There will always be small towns in the certain niche of the day that will do well. That won't be many and it'll likely not be consistent.
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Old 04-02-2019, 06:48 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,845 posts, read 2,975,563 times
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If they made a come back, wouldn't everyone flock there?
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