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Old 03-14-2008, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Orange, California
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It is always interesting to compare road maps of eastern states to western states. When you look at road maps of states like Pennsylvania, Ohio, Virginia, Georgia, etc., it is striking how there are towns and cities completely saturating a complex "spider web" network of roads and highways. Whereas you look at road maps of states like Oregon and Nevada and you see a single interstate with towns clustered along it and vast tracks of unpopulated land. Also, even when you look at the density of a "dense" state like California, you notice that most of the population is clustered around the southern and central coast region.
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Old 03-14-2008, 02:05 PM
 
238 posts, read 692,066 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by minneahouston View Post
We are constantly talking about city density on this board. However, I did a search to see if there were any lists that provided the density of an entire state. Just curious as to what your thoughts are.

I think that New Jersey would take the prize here, but what about Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maryland, Rhode Island, Delaware, possibly
Ohio and Florida.

Texas has a large population, but also large land area, same with California.

What do you think??
The answer to that question is NONE. As long as states have ample farmland and empty spaces, there really is no dense state. Cities are another thing, but states? Nope.
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Old 03-14-2008, 02:24 PM
 
Location: The Woods
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wade_word View Post
The answer to that question is NONE. As long as states have ample farmland and empty spaces, there really is no dense state. Cities are another thing, but states? Nope.
But some states are mostly city...and what isn't city in some states is divided into such small parcels (a few to five acres each often) that the seemingly "rural" areas are fairly densely populated. Of course density is a matter of perception, which is individual. I see most of VT as being too dense for my tastes, but others may not consider it even close to being so.
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Old 03-14-2008, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Sacramento, CA
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Here is a density map by county:

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Old 03-14-2008, 04:17 PM
 
Location: 3219'03.7"N 10643'55.9"W
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I made my own, to indicate the breaks in population, using 7 to 100, 100 to 500, etc.


To answer a question: Los Angeles County = 4589 square miles, and 9,873,548 residents as of 2003. That's more than all but 9 states. New Jersey in 2003 was 8,604,674, over 7507 square miles. However, it should be noted that about 20% of NJ is located in the Pinelands preserve, which is the LEAST densely populated area between Central Maine and Richmond Virginia.

Some other facts: out of the 3141 counties and independent cities, 124 of these have population densities of over 1000 people per square mile as of 2003. They contained 102million of the then 291 million nationally. We have since gone over 300 million people. These 124 counties comprised 48106 square miles, or roughly the size of New York State. The remainder of the continental US is 2,959,292 square miles that contain the rest of the population.

I am fortunate (to me) and blessed to be in one of the 3017 counties that has less than 1000 people per square mile.
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Old 03-14-2008, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Northwest CT
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I don't think it's as bad as many people might think living in a densely populated state. The biggest issue, to me atleast, is traffc. I feel like there is always traffic all the time. But in terms of density, a lot of times, in CT atleast, the larger towns and cities are where it's most dense. CT, MA, RI, VT, and NH are split up into towns. No matter where one goes, he/she is always in a town. Each town basically runs itself and has its own zoning regulations. There's still a lot of space around. There aren't 702 people per sq mi throughout the entire state.
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Old 03-14-2008, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Orange, California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davfar View Post
I don't think it's as bad as many people might think living in a densely populated state.
Agreed. And even in a densely populated state, there are always places you can find tremendous solitude. For instance, northeastern California is as sparsely populated as almost anywhere else in the United States, even though the state is designated as very densely populated based on the huge coastal population.
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Old 03-14-2008, 06:40 PM
 
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Well Bergen County NJ has a smaller area than Orange County CA, but has a slightly higher population density.

And the City of Los Angeles according to Wiki is larger in area than Hudson County NJ, but Hudson County has a higher population density.

Northern NJ is probably second most densely populated place in USA after NYC
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Old 03-14-2008, 08:34 PM
 
786 posts, read 2,324,202 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j1n View Post
I remember hearing, a few years back, that NJ had more people per square mile than China does per square mile. I lived in NJ almost my whole life...up until last year, and it is wall-to-wall people.
You must have lived in North Jersey close to NYC, because down south and west it becomes rural and relatively empty.
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Old 03-17-2008, 10:35 AM
 
Location: 3219'03.7"N 10643'55.9"W
8,115 posts, read 17,338,952 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kalim2008 View Post
You must have lived in North Jersey close to NYC, because down south and west it becomes rural and relatively empty.
By New Jersey standards, yes. By national standards, not even close. Case in point, Salem County NJ is the least densely populated county in the state, by far, with a population density of 184.5 people per square mile. If you were to rank this amongst 3109 counties (subtracting independent cities in Virginia, Baltimore, and St. Louis) it would still be ranked 504th out of 3109, or in the upper 20% of population density. After Salem County, the next lowest population density belongs to Sussex County, which has 260 people per square mile. This ranks 403rd out of 3109. In other words, a New Jerseyan's perception of "the country" is just that: a perception. The reality is that all 21 NJ counties are encapsulated within a census-defined MSA, and New Jersey is the only state that holds this distinction.
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