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Old 08-26-2017, 09:31 PM
 
13,572 posts, read 22,022,427 times
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Rural and Exurban Oregon.
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Old 08-27-2017, 02:42 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,732,092 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cttransplant85 View Post
Poor is poorly defined. I know a person making $13 an hour in Mississippi with 5 acres of land, kids, a truck, living well; and a person making 75K a year struggling without a vehicle sharing an apartment in Fairfield Connecticut
Especially in America it is poorly defined.

There are people who are actually doing well who think they are poor because they never knew worse.

The house I grew up in, people don't even believe exists in NY. That's why I have photos posted here.

It didn't have a usable bathroom. No tub, the "sink" emptied into a bucket, and the toilet was falling into the cellar so we had to use a ceramic pot (I got to empty it being the youngest male, wee). There was no insulation, just beams, some kind of press board kinda stuff, and tar-paper. No heat save for our one kerosene heater. The north half of the house was collapsed, so the north wall of the half-story second floor was just two tarps nailed to the beams.

We relied heavily on church run food pantries for our food. We didn't have a car most of the time, so even though Elmira was only half an hour away, there was no getting there.

My parents never had money in the bank. What they made was so caught up in student loan debt, backed up power bills, and other debts that we never had anything left and collectors hounded us constantly when we had a phone (which was inconsistent in itself).

Other places I lived as a kid were even worse. Trailers that were so bad they would have been condemned if the state ever checked in.

The list goes on how poor my family was for the majority of my childhood.

I knew poor. Even though some people had it even worse, especially in other countries, my situation still sucked immensely.

I remember for a few years in the mid to late nineties we actually did alright living near Etna. However, a combination of bad business deals and family drama kicked us back down by '98.

I've met people who thought only having 100k in the bank meant they were poor. I cannot believe that kind of ignorance.
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Old 08-27-2017, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Atlanta metro (Cobb County)
1,561 posts, read 744,703 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fezzador View Post
What's sad is that it's not entirely unreasonable to predict that New Mexico may one day overtake Mississippi as the poorest state. Maybe not for another generation or so, but it's heading that way.

On a somewhat more positive note, New Mexico reminds me a bit of South Dakota (the biggest difference is the Spanish influence). They're dry, sparsely populated states with significant percentages of indigenous peoples, and simultaneously have some of the most breathtaking scenery in the country, along with some of the dullest.
While New Mexico's economy is one of the weakest in the nation, the state does attract quite a few well-to-do retirees and independent professionals, especially around Santa Fe. The federal labs in Albuquerque and Los Alamos aren't going away and are a major source of good quality jobs. Most of the state outside of that north central area is in pretty bad shape, however, except for the energy hubs (e.g. Farmington, Hobbs, Carlsbad) during industry boom cycles.

Most of Mississippi outside the Delta seems pretty much even with the norm for the rural and small-city southern US. One problem for Mississippi is that unlike just about every other Southern state, is that it has no large or even medium sized, highly prosperous metropolitan area. Of course there is no Dallas, Atlanta, Charlotte or Nashville but they don't have a smaller urban center performing as well as Huntsville, Lexington, Charleston or Fayetteville/Springdale either. The only million plus metro with a presence in Mississippi is Memphis, and the affluent sections of that area are in Tennessee.

The New Mexico-South Dakota comparison is interesting. One key difference is that South Dakota has a far lower degree of socioeconomic distress outside the reservations.
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Old 08-27-2017, 09:25 AM
 
100 posts, read 62,571 times
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Do poor regions in general have a noticeable amount of poverty ? By that I mean will you see less people in those regions running around with smartphones and new shiny cars ? Will you see a lot of poorly dressed people and run down living quarters ?

Also do a higher than average amount of people in such regions lack home internet access and/or computers ?
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Old 08-27-2017, 06:02 PM
 
633 posts, read 489,350 times
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I get the impression from this thread that to a lot of people "poor" simply means "rural".
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Old 08-27-2017, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,732,092 times
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Originally Posted by deb100 View Post
I get the impression from this thread that to a lot of people "poor" simply means "rural".
I agree. Like I said above, there are a lot of people who aren't poor who think they are, and that's saying nothing of city people who have skewed perspectives.
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Old 08-27-2017, 08:51 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,724,856 times
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[quote=Gene Chode;49328375]Do poor regions in general have a noticeable amount of poverty ? By that I mean will you see less people in those regions running around with smartphones and new shiny cars ?

You can get a smartphone for $25 with a pay by month plan for as little as $15/month with enough data to surf the web. You can get a rather decent smart phone for around $100. Yes, the most lauded phones cost $500+, but generally speaking smart phones are not a luxury item and all but the most desperately poor can afford them.

Even poor regions have a middle and upper class, but you will see a lot of old cars, limping along compared to wealthier areas.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene Chode View Post
Will you see a lot of poorly dressed people and run down living quarters ?
Yes, these are the most obvious visual cues that the area you are in is poor. Much more so than cars and phones.
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Old 08-27-2017, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,732,092 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Yes, these are the most obvious visual cues that the area you are in is poor. Much more so than cars and phones.
To build on this, sometimes cars can look nice, but be broken as all heck inside as people can't afford to fix them.
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Old 08-28-2017, 09:36 AM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,412 posts, read 7,705,831 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KayneMo View Post
The Ouachita Mountains in southeastern Oklahoma, my home territory. Beautiful region but quite poor.
That's where Momma is from. Beautiful, but yes, poor, and I love it nonetheless.

Far western Oklahoma is quite poor too. It has that Southwest ranching vibe that one gets driving through west Texas and eastern New Mexico.
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Old 08-28-2017, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,572 posts, read 17,544,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene Chode View Post
Do poor regions in general have a noticeable amount of poverty ? By that I mean will you see less people in those regions running around with smartphones and new shiny cars ? Will you see a lot of poorly dressed people and run down living quarters ?

Also do a higher than average amount of people in such regions lack home internet access and/or computers ?
I'm from and currently live in Sullivan County, TN, which ranks a little below average on the map in the article linked below. It is a few years old, and the unemployment figures are pretty inaccurate now, but it has good insight. However, surrounding rural counties in TN and most of the counties in nearby extreme southwest Virginia are in abject poverty. I also lived in Hamilton County, IN (#12 of 31xx counties) and Dallas County, IA (#7x of 31xx counties).

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/26/u...s.html?mcubz=3

My county has all the essentials, but it lacks in numerous amenities I got used to in Carmel, IN and West Des Moines, IA. There really isn't any sort of upscale shopping of any kind in this county. Target and J.C. Penney (both of which are struggling in my city) are as high end as it gets. The city schools are pretty good, but the county schools suck. There is little violent crime, but a lot of property crime related to drugs.

Once you get into the rural southwest VA counties, you start losing internet access, cell service, no doctors for a long way, etc.
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