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Old 09-06-2017, 08:24 PM
 
Location: IN
20,853 posts, read 35,970,544 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The_General View Post
Manchester is basically the only metro in New Hampshire. NH seems to want low taxes and don't care about social issues. That is what I thought Libertarian was.
NH is more libertarian compared to many states with no state income tax, (interest and dividend investment income taxed, however), no sales tax, (room and restaurant meals are taxed highly, though). The caveat is local government via the town meetings lead to more input from local populace on spending that only impacts that town via property taxes. Property taxes, therefore, vary widely in NH on a town to town basis. The spread has become enormous with wealthy enclaves that have equalized property tax rates of $6.00 per $1,000 assessed value to poorer towns with $42.00 per $1,000 assessed value.
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Old 09-08-2017, 11:25 AM
 
101 posts, read 54,226 times
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Libertarianism is the social system based on property rights, where the rightful owners have have property rights, and can tell the non owners to f off. Zoning is one of the most important portions of the administrative state at the local level especially at the city and metro level. The Houston metro has small islands of traditional zoning in a sea of non zoning.
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Old 09-08-2017, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Mars City
5,091 posts, read 2,148,028 times
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Libertarians tend to be the hardcore anti-government folks. They also tend to lay low (they do their hits on society in a stealth way). The Koch brothers would be a classic example. And they are folks that think they're educated but also love guns. Carry your gun and memorize the Constitution and study the founding fathers. They tend to read a lot, though it's in a very limited and narrow way. They don't like the political parties, but they're also extreme, especially on the right, and could never pull together any kind of majority.

Houston most definitely isn't a liberatarian haven. There's a wide variety of people and beliefs, but politically, it's mostly the typical republican / democrat story. There are some liberatarian pockets in Texas, but they're far away from the big cities. They're mostly in the western part of the state, where people can roam large and control their land. They really don't like people, and want to live alone and be left alone. It's very easy to see the mold and the pattern that they follow.

Back to Houston again, the absence of zoning is just an approach that was adopted early on, and has nothing to do with any political beliefs. It probably reflects a preference for simplicity, as is common in the state, like also not having an income tax. Less stuff to manage and control.

Last edited by Thoreau424; 09-08-2017 at 12:27 PM..
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Old 09-08-2017, 12:40 PM
 
101 posts, read 54,226 times
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Then what major metro is?
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Old 09-08-2017, 12:59 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,239,618 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dixiedean1878 View Post
Libertarianism is the social system based on property rights, where the rightful owners have have property rights, and can tell the non owners to f off. Zoning is one of the most important portions of the administrative state at the local level especially at the city and metro level. The Houston metro has small islands of traditional zoning in a sea of non zoning.
Houston still regulates LAND USE. So yes, you can technically build a bar next to an elementary school. But that bar better have a parking lot in front.
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Old 09-09-2017, 12:04 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Missouri outside of STL and KC is in the middle of the Bible Belt, so I would disagree with that.
I'm not saying Missouri is completely libertarian, but:

It has low taxes, loose gun laws, loose alcohol laws (aside from the early last call), and loose tobacco laws. And probably other things I can't think of right now.

I remember reading a free state project map which ranks each state by how libertarian they are, and Missouri ranked #1.
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Old 09-09-2017, 12:05 AM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,594,993 times
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Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
Houston still regulates LAND USE. So yes, you can technically build a bar next to an elementary school. But that bar better have a parking lot in front.
The idea of a bar having a parking lot is so weird to me!
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Old 09-09-2017, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,647,636 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dixiedean1878 View Post
Then what major metro is?
Being in a city is mutually exclusive with libertarianism, because being in a city requires a collective sharing of certain amenities (roads, schools, parks, energy, transportation, water, police, etc) that are preferably by the majority of people voted on and decided on by the citizens of that jurisdiction, which is antithetical to libertarianism.

The bigger the city is the more likely amenities are shared with the people, which most of the time are decided on communally by votes from the citizens, rather than a private corporation who you cannot influence just because you live there. This is why nearly every big city votes Democrat. A private corporation will do what is profitable. When it comes to a city, people tend to prefer what other citizens want to do, not a couple CEOs.

To be a libertarian in its truest form you pretty much have to live in a rural area. Some towns in Wyoming have a libertarian framework with volunteer 911 operators, only volunteer fire, etc. and some times if you have an emergency in these areas you can be screwed because the volunteer 911 operators are asleep. That's what you get when you don't have the city services to pay for 911 or a fire department. But, it's cohesive with the libertarian ideology.
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Old 09-09-2017, 03:17 PM
 
101 posts, read 54,226 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
Houston still regulates LAND USE. So yes, you can technically build a bar next to an elementary school. But that bar better have a parking lot in front.
Yes but that bar would have the same requirment for parking if it was built in a nightlife district. Houstons parking requirements are actually less stringent than most other cities.
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Old 09-09-2017, 03:20 PM
 
101 posts, read 54,226 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Being in a city is mutually exclusive with libertarianism, because being in a city requires a collective sharing of certain amenities (roads, schools, parks, energy, transportation, water, police, etc) that are preferably by the majority of people voted on and decided on by the citizens of that jurisdiction, which is antithetical to libertarianism.

The bigger the city is the more likely amenities are shared with the people, which most of the time are decided on communally by votes from the citizens, rather than a private corporation who you cannot influence just because you live there. This is why nearly every big city votes Democrat. A private corporation will do what is profitable. When it comes to a city, people tend to prefer what other citizens want to do, not a couple CEOs.

To be a libertarian in its truest form you pretty much have to live in a rural area. Some towns in Wyoming have a libertarian framework with volunteer 911 operators, only volunteer fire, etc. and some times if you have an emergency in these areas you can be screwed because the volunteer 911 operators are asleep. That's what you get when you don't have the city services to pay for 911 or a fire department. But, it's cohesive with the libertarian ideology.
No the better way of doing this is have developers set up a HOA board that hires the police, fire and what not, and much of suburban houston is in unincorporated areas where the developers do just that.
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