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Old 09-01-2017, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Brew City
4,220 posts, read 2,503,558 times
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Oooh, would someone do an assessment of Milwaukee? I'm moving there in a few months. Shorewood to be exact.
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Old 09-01-2017, 08:49 AM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,816 posts, read 12,321,925 times
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I think Colorado Springs is probably the most suburban city I've ever been to. There doesn't really seem to be a downtown at all and very few high rises.

Baton Rouge is also a very suburban city but its also a city of neighborhoods and many parts of town do have their own distinctive character. Most people do commute into the city to work from the suburbs and there are few major employment centers outside the city itself, but nonetheless the city of Baton Rouge has a very suburban character. Lot of office parks and residential neighborhoods and heavy industry like refineries.

New Orleans and Baltimore are the ultimate city of neighborhoods.

Downtown is probably the only nice areas of St. Louis, Detroit, and Memphis.
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Old 09-01-2017, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,752,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
There aren't any that have some walkability and/or at least a Downtown with things going on?
All of the suburbs on the southshore are dense and built on a solid street grid but, the East bank has Old Metairie which has a couple shops and summer old rich mansions but it's not a downtown, there is Old town Kenneri think they call it but it's not a conventional downtown either. The westbank suburbs do have downtowns but they are small and most of the westbank is undesirable in my opinion. They Northshore does have active downtown areas and nice, safe suburbs. But for the most part, the suburbs are not great unless you want to drive an hour to the city in traffic.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
I think Colorado Springs is probably the most suburban city I've ever been to. There doesn't really seem to be a downtown at all and very few high rises.

Baton Rouge is also a very suburban city but its also a city of neighborhoods and many parts of town do have their own distinctive character. Most people do commute into the city to work from the suburbs and there are few major employment centers outside the city itself, but nonetheless the city of Baton Rouge has a very suburban character. Lot of office parks and residential neighborhoods and heavy industry like refineries.

New Orleans and Baltimore are the ultimate city of neighborhoods.

Downtown is probably the only nice areas of St. Louis, Detroit, and Memphis.
Colorado Springs is a small city, but you can see downtown from the interstate.

Baton Rouge is not very suburban. Most of the city limits is on a street grid. South Baton Rouge is not the city limits outside of the mall. All of what you describe would have been St George if they were able to incorporate, but they weren't so it's just unincorporated East Baton Rouge Parish.
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Old 09-01-2017, 12:58 PM
 
211 posts, read 172,302 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post



Downtown is probably the only nice areas of St. Louis, Detroit, and Memphis.

Not true.

STL is a VERY neighborhood focused city. For good and bad. While it's bad areas are as bad as advertised, there's much more intact that's not visible from I-70 and I'm not even sure downtown is even close to being the nicest part of that city. Great Areas include the "Hill," Soulard, and South side of STL city. Also, there's the Central West End/Forest Park/University City axis, which is probably as or more active than the actual downtown and has some of that city's most sought after real estate.

Much the same applies to Memphis.

While Beale Street rocks downtown Memphis, it seems like most of that city's activity lies along an axis stretching along Poplar from about East Parkway going toward East Memphis and Germantown. The signature Overton Park is at the western end of this spine with some of Memphis' most stately real estate, and University of Memphis (and surrounding neighborhood) sit just to the south of this spine.

Can't speak on Detroit, unfortunately
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Old 09-01-2017, 03:39 PM
 
56,564 posts, read 80,847,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2000_Watts View Post
Not true.

STL is a VERY neighborhood focused city. For good and bad. While it's bad areas are as bad as advertised, there's much more intact that's not visible from I-70 and I'm not even sure downtown is even close to being the nicest part of that city. Great Areas include the "Hill," Soulard, and South side of STL city. Also, there's the Central West End/Forest Park/University City axis, which is probably as or more active than the actual downtown and has some of that city's most sought after real estate.

Much the same applies to Memphis.

While Beale Street rocks downtown Memphis, it seems like most of that city's activity lies along an axis stretching along Poplar from about East Parkway going toward East Memphis and Germantown. The signature Overton Park is at the western end of this spine with some of Memphis' most stately real estate, and University of Memphis (and surrounding neighborhood) sit just to the south of this spine.

Can't speak on Detroit, unfortunately
Detroit also has some nice, middle class areas of the city around/just west of Woodward in the northern end of the city, the villages, the Rosedale area and outer SW neighborhoods.
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Old 09-02-2017, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Phoenix
5,643 posts, read 7,445,655 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NigerianNightmare View Post
By CSAs
1. New York- Downtown/Neighborhood City, with all the fantastic neighborhoods NYC has, Lower Manhattan and Midtown Manhattan dominate people's view of the city completely.

2. Los Angeles- Suburban/Exurban (Although LA is known for its Neighborhoods), it's suburbs really dominate the sphere, Malibu, Beverly Hills, Santa Monica, Orange County, Inland Empire, Long Beach, Inglewood, Compton, San Gabriel Valley, Culver City.

3. Chicago- Downtown/Neighborhood, This is the most obvious Downtown one on the list IMO.

4. Washington-Baltimore- Suburban- NOVA, Montgomery County, Prince Goerge's County, Baltimore County, Howard County, Anne Arundel County.

5. San Jose-San Francisco-Oakland- Suburban/Exurban Most obvious suburban one. In a few years it might be actually be Exurban depending on if people priced out end up moving to Stockton and the core of San Francisco starts to slow. Currently only 54% live in the core MSA. Also a huge portion of Silicon Valley as well as Napa Valley and San Jose itself are in different MSA's, making it more "exurban" IMO.

6. Boston- Suburban/Neighborhood, currently 58% of people live in Boston MSA, and Boston doesn't even cover a tenth of it's CSA population which includes other large cities. Providence, Worcester, Nashua, Manchester, Lowell, Cambridge and many other inner suburbs, while Boston definitely seems like a neighborhood city, it's CSA is just too much to overlook when judging the city.

7. Dallas- Suburban/ Neighborhood- Irving, Plano, Arlington, Garland the list goes on, this metro fights with it's suburbs for amenities because their so big.


8. Philadelphia- Downtown/Suburban Another tight one but even with the addition of Atlantic City, much of South Jersey, Camden, Wilmington and Reading almost every secondary city is struggling and Center City seems to be buzzing.

9. Houston- Neighborhoods/Downtown , first neighborhood because much of the city limits is huge and much of the focus in Houston is on the Western Half of The Inner Loop, West Along I-Ten and even the poor SW with it's weird mix of almost every ethnic groups shopping area and high density.

10. Miami-Fort Lauderdale- Suburban/Exurban, could be exurban if Fort Lauderdale and Palm Beach continue to grow as well as areas to the north.

11. Atlanta- Neighborhood/Suburban- Isn't even a tenth of the metro and IMO is on the edge of changing from a neighborhood to a suburban area due to rapid growth in places like Gwinnett County.

12. Detroit- Suburban/Downtown- Downtown Detroit is apparently making a comeback but for now it seems the suburbs dominate the city.

13. Phoenix- Suburban- I think Phoenix has been pushed into a situation were it Suburbs are starting to overshadow it but not for the same reasons as Detroit so their is nowhere to comeback from. I don't know if Phoenix suburbs are just densifying or new ones are being created, I don't think Phoenix is getting true exurbs either.

14. Seattle- Downtown/Neighborhood- I don't see it's suburbs as that powerful at all and I've heard talk of Seattle being the fastest U.S city to "urbanize" and if the city keeps gaining residents and the suburbs don't takeoff it should eventually transition from a Downtown Seattle focused city to a neighborhood focused city.
Let's not act like downtown and midtown Phoenix aren't focused on infill and increasing density. There's been more development (primarily residential multi-family construction) happening lately in these areas than in quite some time. I will admit Phoenix does have to compete with cities like Tempe, Scottsdale, and Chandler (among others) for jobs. Tempe and its 40.23 sq. miles is experiencing quite a development boom - of course with smaller city limits, there's no where to go but up. Many of the resorts lie in Scottsdale and North Phoenix which is why you won't see a ton of hi-rise hotels in downtown Phoenix. Entertainment in the valley is split primarily between Scottsdale, Tempe, and Phoenix with some pockets in other areas.
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Old 09-02-2017, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
8,702 posts, read 11,925,208 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NigerianNightmare View Post
8. Philadelphia- Downtown/Suburban Another tight one but even with the addition of Atlantic City, much of South Jersey, Camden, Wilmington and Reading almost every secondary city is struggling and Center City seems to be buzzing.
Camden is on a come back. The Waterfront/Cooper Grant, Downtown/Rutgers campus, Lanning Square/Cooper Medical Campus, and Knight's Crossing/Campbell's Soup campus are all building up, revitalizing and gentrifying. Camden is also relatively small, at only 10 square miles.

Wilmington is not really struggling, just has some neighborhoods with high pockets of crime. Wilmington has one of the highest concentrations of major companies per capita in the country. There is a large amount of financial companies, banking companies, law firms and credit card companies located in Wilmington. Plus, Downtown, the Waterfront, and Trolley square are all very nice areas. Wilmington isn't very big at only 11 square miles.

There are also plenty of other significant, walkable towns or small cities throughout the Philadelphia Metro as well, which are very nice, like Ardmore, Bryn Mawr, Conshohocken, West Chester, Doylestown, Media, Newark, Upper Darby, Norristown, Phoenixville, Pottstown, Jenkintown, Collingswood, Haddonfield, Ocean City, Stone Harbor, Cape May, Wildwood, etc. etc.
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Old 09-02-2017, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
8,702 posts, read 11,925,208 times
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Philadelphia

It's really tough to say. I would say Philadelphia is a good mix of everything, while leaning towards a Downtown city.

-Downtown/Center City is obviously hot

-It has a good level of popular and vibrant neighborhoods outside of Downtown, like University City (if you don't consider that Downtown), Spruce Hill, Cedar Park, Powelton Village, Graduate Hospital, Queen Village, Bella Vista, Passyunk Square, East Passyunk Crossing, Newbold, Pennsport, Northern Liberties, Fishtown, Kensington, Fairmount, Spring Garden, Brewerytown, Spring Arts, Templetown, East Falls, Manayunk, Roxborough, Germantown, East Mount Airy, West Mount Airy, Chestnut Hill, Mayfair, Fox Chase, etc.

-Plenty of popular suburban spots like Ardmore, Bryn Mawr, Wayne, Phoenixville, King of Prussia, Cherry Hill, Conshohocken, Jenkintown, Newtown, Doylestown, Bristol, New Hope, Media, Upper Darby, Norristown, West Chester, Kennett Square, Wilmington, Newark, Haddonfield, Collingswood, Glassboro, Atlantic City, Ocean City, Wildwood, Capy May, Stone Harbor, etc. etc.
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Old 09-02-2017, 09:48 AM
JJG
 
Location: Fort Worth
13,247 posts, read 19,173,700 times
Reputation: 7005
Fort Worth:

- Downtown

- "The Core Hoods", which are the major neighborhoods within a 3 mile radius of Downtown
(Near Southside, West 7th/Cultural District, Stockyards, River Arts District, and Panther Island coming soon.)

- Everything outside of that but within 820 is Post WWII - 70s suburbs.

- Everything outside of 820 is 70s to modern day suburbs, including the Alliance Corridor way up north, which is pretty much becoming a psuedo town within another town.
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