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Old 09-07-2017, 04:58 PM
 
1,353 posts, read 1,272,542 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
Have I ever left Florida? Dude I'm from NYC, I've been around, I don't even live in Miami anymore.

And I stopped reading your post when you stated "You can drive less than 2 hours outside of Phoenix." That's pretty much my point right there; and either way it's still just Phoenix and nothing else. Compared to Houston, El Paso, and Dallas all within the state of Texas. Three totally different cities geographically, all within the same state, that's diversity.
I don't think you understood the OP's question. Geographically, Texas is all very similar. There is not a lot of topography. El Paso is different from Dallas, yes, but they are also like 600 miles away from one another. Geographical diversity isn't a few different cities, it is being able to water ski and snow ski all on the same day.
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Old 09-07-2017, 06:43 PM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
2,143 posts, read 1,518,376 times
Reputation: 1845
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajonesaz View Post
I don't think you understood the OP's question. Geographically, Texas is all very similar. There is not a lot of topography. El Paso is different from Dallas, yes, but they are also like 600 miles away from one another. Geographical diversity isn't a few different cities, it is being able to water ski and snow ski all on the same day.
In terms of area, because it's the largest, the West would be the most diverse. But when it comes to actual cities within the regions, the West isn't as diverse. Topography is just a small part of it, what about the vegetation? The weather? Soil? Rivers? etc. Outside of California, the west really doesn't come close.
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Old 09-07-2017, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,929 posts, read 2,211,473 times
Reputation: 2610
Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
In terms of area, because it's the largest, the West would be the most diverse. But when it comes to actual cities within the regions, the West isn't as diverse. Topography is just a small part of it, what about the vegetation? The weather? Soil? Rivers? etc. Outside of California, the west really doesn't come close.
Washington and Oregon are also very diverse, just look at Clallam County

Forks: 119.72 in of precipitation
Sequim: 15.98 in of precipitation
Difference: 103.74 in

Is there any other county in the US that has such stark differences in precipitation? Oh wait there is, Jefferson county, right next to Clallam County.

Hoh Rainforest: 127.81 in of precipitation
Port Townsend: 19.04 in of precipitation
Difference: 108.77 in


Or the state of WA in general
Amanda Park: 129.28 in of precipitation
Hanford Site: 6.14 in of precipitation
Difference: 123.14 in

Last edited by grega94; 09-07-2017 at 08:29 PM..
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Old 09-07-2017, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,929 posts, read 2,211,473 times
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Olympic National Park is probably the most diverse park in the nation. It has beaches, several large lakes and rivers, rainforest, alpine forests, alpine meadows, and glaciers all in the area of just 1,144.6 sq mi or just slightly less than the size of Rhode Island.
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Old 09-07-2017, 08:44 PM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
2,143 posts, read 1,518,376 times
Reputation: 1845
Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
Washington and Oregon are also very diverse, just look at Clallam County

Forks: 119.72 in of precipitation
Sequim: 15.98 in of precipitation
Difference: 103.74 in

Is there any other county in the US that has such stark differences in precipitation? Oh wait there is, Jefferson county, right next to Clallam County.

Hoh Rainforest: 127.81 in of precipitation
Port Townsend: 19.04 in of precipitation
Difference: 108.77 in


Or the state of WA in general
Amanda Park: 129.28 in of precipitation
Hanford Site: 6.14 in of precipitation
Difference: 123.14 in
That's cool and all, but it's really not my point.When it comes to geographic diversity, is there any cities in Washington significantly different from Seattle like Atlanta and Savannah? Or Birmingham and Mobile?
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Old 09-07-2017, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,929 posts, read 2,211,473 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
That's cool and all, but it's really not my point.When it comes to geographic diversity, is there any cities in Washington significantly different from Seattle like Atlanta and Savannah? Or Birmingham and Mobile?
Seattle
pop: 704,352
Metro: 3,733,580
CSA: 4,459,677
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Se...2.332077?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6071...2!8i6656?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6382...2!8i6656?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.7590...2!8i6656?hl=en

Spokane
pop: 215,973
Metro: 556,634
CSA: 710,945
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Sp....4260807?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6582...2!8i6656?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6472...2!8i6656?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6958...2!8i6656?hl=en

Kennewick
pop: 80,454
Metro: 279,116
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ke....1371155?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/@46.2086...2!8i6656?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/@46.1698...2!8i6656?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/@46.2063...2!8i6656?hl=en

I would say that those three are fairly different from one another
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Old 09-07-2017, 10:11 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,460 posts, read 25,401,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
Eh, I see you don't have very familiarity with the South, especially when you think most of the South is nothing but flat pine scrub areas.

Look at this; you have El Paso and Houston in Texas, Memphis and Nashville in TN, Birmingham and Mobile in AL, Atlanta and Savannah in GA, Greenville and Charleston in SC, Miami and Orlando in FL, etc. On the other hand, cities out west don't really differentiate in terms of look and weather like many of the cities within their states do in the South.
The OP mentioned around a 3-hour radius. You're talking about a 24-48 hour radius LOL. Sure when you traverse 2/3rd's of the country I'm sure it can be very diverse.
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Old 09-07-2017, 10:30 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,460 posts, read 25,401,064 times
Reputation: 8931
I don't get people saying the South, maybe for biodiversity but not geographical. The climate does not change within a 3-hour radius. The elevation change is not that great either.

In San Diego County alone you go from beach, coastal plain, foothills, forests, mountains, and desert within about a 45-60 minute drive. YOu litterally can drive on a road with alpine forests on one side and desert below on the other (Sunrise Highway https://goo.gl/maps/SqmKCYrypJu) Just the fact that there are microclimates and on the local news you get the weather forecast for about 3-4 different zones whose temperatures vary by as much as 40 degrees within a single metropolitan area speaks volumes. You watch the weather forecast in LA and they show forecasts for different microclimates with a picture of a beach in the background for one and people skiing for another.

I would say Southern CA followed by Northern CA probably offer the most geographic diversity within 3 hours. NorCal lacks a desert though Reno is about 3.5 hours from SF so that might count. Seattle probably too.

NorCal has the cooler coast with beaches, redwoods and hilly grasslands. Mountains with alpine forests and lower elevation redwood and oak forests. Flat farmland like the Midwest, rivers, alpine mountains, lakes, etc...

Southern CA is basically what I mentioned for San Diego but LA has taller mountains with more alpine forests and skiing. Plus the flat farmland of Kern County, high desert (cold in winter), and low desert. Plus areas with massive sand dunes: https://goo.gl/maps/P4frBW64JGC2 .

The Big Island of Hawaii too as they have the most climate zones in such a small area. You can go from tropical beaches (both arid and rainy/lush), desert that look like the moon because of all the volcanic rock, grasslands, tropical forests, snow-capped mountains, and active volcanoes. It has 10 of the world's 14 climate zones: Hawaii Is Home To Ten Of The World's 14 Climate Zones. This is all within about 2 hours of each other.

(edit: just saw Hawaii was supposed to be excluded but still....lol)

Last edited by sav858; 09-07-2017 at 10:43 PM..
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Old 09-08-2017, 09:09 AM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
2,143 posts, read 1,518,376 times
Reputation: 1845
Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
Seattle
pop: 704,352
Metro: 3,733,580
CSA: 4,459,677
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Se...2.332077?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6071...2!8i6656?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6382...2!8i6656?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.7590...2!8i6656?hl=en

Spokane
pop: 215,973
Metro: 556,634
CSA: 710,945
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Sp....4260807?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6582...2!8i6656?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6472...2!8i6656?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6958...2!8i6656?hl=en

Kennewick
pop: 80,454
Metro: 279,116
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ke....1371155?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/@46.2086...2!8i6656?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/@46.1698...2!8i6656?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/@46.2063...2!8i6656?hl=en

I would say that those three are fairly different from one another
Eh, don't look that different from one another at all; actually I think your post proved my point a bit. I mean look at Georgia...

Atlanta
http://cdn.pcwallart.com/images/atla...allpaper-2.jpg

Savannah
http://209.11.106.140/sir/519/photos...n/154460_1.jpg
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Old 09-08-2017, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Jackson, Mississippi
204 posts, read 162,702 times
Reputation: 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
I don't get people saying the South, maybe for biodiversity but not geographical. The climate does not change within a 3-hour radius. The elevation change is not that great either.

In San Diego County alone you go from beach, coastal plain, foothills, forests, mountains, and desert within about a 45-60 minute drive. YOu litterally can drive on a road with alpine forests on one side and desert below on the other (Sunrise Highway https://goo.gl/maps/SqmKCYrypJu) Just the fact that there are microclimates and on the local news you get the weather forecast for about 3-4 different zones whose temperatures vary by as much as 40 degrees within a single metropolitan area speaks volumes. You watch the weather forecast in LA and they show forecasts for different microclimates with a picture of a beach in the background for one and people skiing for another.

I would say Southern CA followed by Northern CA probably offer the most geographic diversity within 3 hours. NorCal lacks a desert though Reno is about 3.5 hours from SF so that might count. Seattle probably too.

NorCal has the cooler coast with beaches, redwoods and hilly grasslands. Mountains with alpine forests and lower elevation redwood and oak forests. Flat farmland like the Midwest, rivers, alpine mountains, lakes, etc...

Southern CA is basically what I mentioned for San Diego but LA has taller mountains with more alpine forests and skiing. Plus the flat farmland of Kern County, high desert (cold in winter), and low desert. Plus areas with massive sand dunes: https://goo.gl/maps/P4frBW64JGC2 .

The Big Island of Hawaii too as they have the most climate zones in such a small area. You can go from tropical beaches (both arid and rainy/lush), desert that look like the moon because of all the volcanic rock, grasslands, tropical forests, snow-capped mountains, and active volcanoes. It has 10 of the world's 14 climate zones: Hawaii Is Home To Ten Of The World's 14 Climate Zones. This is all within about 2 hours of each other.

(edit: just saw Hawaii was supposed to be excluded but still....lol)
I really can't disagree with you there. Very well written!

I really shouldn't have written that original post. I guess because I have not familiarized myself with the West as much as my own region, I should not have posted about something I really had no idea about.

Also, I think I was really only thinking of Southern California and the Mountain West and thinking of those areas mostly in terms of climate. I really had no idea about Oregon and the drastic difference between East and West Oregon, and Between North and South Oregon, and I really didn't pay much attention to Washington.

It was totally unfair of me to be excluding Hawaii and Alaska, literally the two polar opposites in terms of Climate, and some of the most Geographically diverse regions of America, and home to many of our few active Volcanoes and America's tallest mountain, Denali.

All of you who say the west (that is, West of the Midwest and South (with the South including TX and OK) is the most geographically diverse region are right. That region easily takes the cake even when excluding western Midwestern states and Southern central states located west of the Mississippi River (those include TX, LA, AR, and OK.) It still easily takes the cake even when excluding Hawaii and Alaska!
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