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Old 09-11-2017, 03:38 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,220 posts, read 17,957,502 times
Reputation: 14658

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In 1990, Pennsylvania was the fourth-most obese state. In 2016, it was the 25th-most obese state.

In 1990, Pennsylvania was the second-oldest state. By 2020, it might not even be one of the 10 oldest states.

Mesofacts in motion.
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Old 09-11-2017, 08:57 AM
 
5,427 posts, read 2,825,425 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
In 1990, Pennsylvania was the fourth-most obese state. In 2016, it was the 25th-most obese state.

In 1990, Pennsylvania was the second-oldest state. By 2020, it might not even be one of the 10 oldest states.

Mesofacts in motion.
Interesting article! Thanks for the link. Mesofacts explain why more people are not resisting the ever-increasing loss of privacy hidden under the guise of convenient digital features. Also why obesity rates in the US overall have risen so much. Ever stop to consider that nearly all ready-made sandwiches, most frozen MW meals, and so many restaurant meals contain cheese in them? It's not by accident. US per capita consumption of cheese is many times what it was a few decades ago. And that did not happen all at once. Ditto for sugar in nearly all processed foods, including foods that did not used to taste "sweet" but now do.

Books with some verrrrryy interesting histories of food manufacturing and government manipulative tactics:

Salt Sugar Fat by Michael Moss
The Dorito Effect by Mark Schatzker

Last edited by pikabike; 09-11-2017 at 09:05 AM.. Reason: addition
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Old 09-11-2017, 08:26 PM
 
1,290 posts, read 1,125,052 times
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Obesity is 80-90% diet, not activity. And I'm in the fitness industry. You can't out-workout a **** diet.

Activity alone isn't enough. You need to eat (reasonably) well.
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Old 09-12-2017, 11:22 AM
 
Location: The Springs
1,770 posts, read 2,138,498 times
Reputation: 1850
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
Disagree completely.

Eat meat and you will have high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and all of the problems that go with that.

The China study was not baloney. It was requested by a former emperor of China who was dying of cancer. he requested that the entire population be researched to find out how to cure cancer. The only areas in China at that time that had cancer, were the areas where they ate meat. And as they were all Chinese, genetics were not a factor.

According to the research, if meat is only 5% or less of your calories, you should be fine. But, who does that?

Plus, the studies have shown that any oil, even if it's plant based oil like olive oil or coconut oil, causes high cholesterol and heart disease.

This includes dairy, cheese, eggs.

Defend it all you want. To your death :-)
For the most part, I agree with your disagreement. However, one theory that's been proved many times, over and over... Moderation coupled with portion control. You can exercise and burn 2,500 calories, but if you consume 3,000 calories of whatever, you'll never get ahead. And your body will produce whatever you try to starve from it. Including cholesterol.
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Old 09-12-2017, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Mars City
5,091 posts, read 2,142,356 times
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So what, the ranking of a state? Just because someone lives in a particular location doesn't mean they are stuck being like everyone else there. A person could be in the so-called "fattest" state, but still be in better shape than 95% of Americans. Ultimately, it's the individual that matters. Screw what the masses are, or should be, or whatever.

People are so stuck these days in herd-mentality, and us-vs-them mentality. Endless time comparing ourselves to others, slamming others, looking down on others, etc. Just be yourself and be an individual, and don't worry about everyone else (what they look like, how heavy or skinny they are, and shyte like that).

How about healthiness in thinking? The people who are freest from obsessing about others are the healthiest and most attractive in that regard.
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Old 09-12-2017, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,237,774 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg10556 View Post
California is one of the brokest states in the US (government wise, etc...) just for the record
I thought California had a budget surplus.
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Old 09-12-2017, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, La
2,035 posts, read 4,555,709 times
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The food is too good in Louisiana.
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Old 09-13-2017, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,579 posts, read 17,561,360 times
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Many of the most obese states are famous for their "soul food" cooking.

I'm from Tennessee. Barbeque is a huge thing here. Almost everyone I know drinks at least some sweet tea. Breakfast for a lot of folks is some type of meat on a biscuit. Biscuits and gravy are popular.

I live in Indiana for three years and it doesn't surprise me they make the list. Hoosier tenderloins are thin, but very broad cuts of boneless pork loin breaded and deep fried. I love tenderloin sandwiches, but they aren't healthy at all.

I lived in an affluent community in Indiana and my community here in TN has less than a third of the median HHI as where I lived in Indiana. Grocery stores here often have a limited selection of fresh produce and vegetables. Our farmers markets suck compared to ones I've been to Indiana, Iowa, and Michigan. Many food items are lower end - which means more heavily processed, more sugars, more bad. Many people simply cannot afford to eat healthy in this community.

A lot of people also think that the more rural you go, the cheaper the food gets because you become more local to the source. That's not correct. I live in a town of about 50,000. While we don't have a great selection compared to where I lived in Indiana and Iowa, it is by far better than where I worked in a rural town of 3,000 in southwest Virginia. Prices are much higher in the rural areas, oftentimes because there is no competition and there may be only one store.
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Old 09-13-2017, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Nashville TN, Cincinnati, OH
1,798 posts, read 1,162,799 times
Reputation: 2321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilot1 View Post
It is more of a lifestyle thing in CO, and access to outdoor a activities, and having an active lifestyle.
True I would agree with that.
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Old 09-13-2017, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, Maryland
374 posts, read 345,907 times
Reputation: 458
I am not a troll!
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