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View Poll Results: Where?
New York City 16 3.10%
Greater Boston 32 6.20%
Philly 38 7.36%
DC/N. Virginia 50 9.69%
Raleigh/NC Research Triangle 32 6.20%
Austin 48 9.30%
San Francisco/Bay Area/Silicon Valley 13 2.52%
Baltimore 11 2.13%
Toronto 33 6.40%
Pittsburgh 35 6.78%
Chicago 99 19.19%
Atlanta 109 21.12%
Voters: 516. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 10-11-2017, 01:03 PM
 
Location: New York City
5,705 posts, read 5,098,562 times
Reputation: 2824

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mooguy View Post
Frankly very few American cities have a good reputation outside the US but Boston is definitely one of them. When people think of Bos-NY-Wash, they think precisely that...........old wealth, liberal, and academic Boston, cultural and economic powerhouse NYC, and the political bastion of Washington. Philly doesn't even rank. It's not so much it has a bad reputation internationally but rather that it doesn't have any reputation. When people think of Philly they might think of thr Liberty Bell like when people think of Cincinnati they think of a radio station.
You might want to do some fact checking. The Philadelphia region has an extremely high concentration of world class institutions and people who travel and have some sort of education are aware of that. Falling under the radar does not downplay the city, and that is a total insult to Philadelphia comparing it to Cincinnati.

I don't care about Amazon, I am just correcting you.

Last edited by cpomp; 10-11-2017 at 01:22 PM..

 
Old 10-11-2017, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,531 posts, read 3,679,293 times
Reputation: 4110
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN_Ski View Post
"finding a community that has a strong science, technology, engineering and math education program at the high school level is important to the company". - Jeff Wilke
It's over: Amazon says Seattle area won't win HQ2 | KUOW News and Information

Here is some list I found of the top ranked STEM high schools in the country:
https://www.usnews.com/education/bes...-rankings/stem

Top states are New Jersey, Arizona, Virginia, Texas, and North Carolina.
I find this quote from Jeff Wilke hard to to believe. With Amazon not leaking any information about the the individual cities, why would he? And using the phrase "it's over" doesn't sound like something Amazon would release. That being said, I think Seattle or its suburbs are a real longshot, unless this whole thing is just a smokescreen to get better deals in the Seattle area. Unlikely, but I am not surprised by anything these days.
 
Old 10-12-2017, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,320 posts, read 55,123,408 times
Reputation: 15389
This is intriguing. Unlike other places, Amazon didnt get any tax breaks from Santa Cruz and it's not immediately clear what developers down there are working on
Quote:
Originally Posted by CNBC
Amazon has quietly been growing a mysterious office in a small surf town near San Francisco

-Amazon has quietly expanded its presence in Santa Cruz, California, according to the Silicon Valley Business Journal.

-It's unclear why Amazon's office is growing in Santa Cruz, a small surf town better known for its beachfront entertainment park and university.

-Most of the team there is believed to be working on the Alexa platform.
https://www.cnbc.com/2017/10/11/amaz...anta-cruz.html
 
Old 10-12-2017, 08:36 AM
 
11,171 posts, read 22,361,018 times
Reputation: 10919
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
This is intriguing. Unlike other places, Amazon didnt get any tax breaks from Santa Cruz and it's not immediately clear what developers down there are working on

https://www.cnbc.com/2017/10/11/amaz...anta-cruz.html
I think this is happening in a lot of areas. Amazon just opened a new office in Chicago with 400 people and they also announced a new office in NYC with 2,000 people.

Lots of tech is spreading out. Facebook just took out a lease for over 100,000 sf on the four floors directly above my office in our building to employ 600 people.

Lots of tech is following millennials as they congregate into larger urban areas around the country. I know Chicago has benefited immensely from this. Employment in the Chicago loop is up by 95,018 in only six years, that's 20% growth.
 
Old 10-12-2017, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,320 posts, read 55,123,408 times
Reputation: 15389
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
I think this is happening in a lot of areas. Amazon just opened a new office in Chicago with 400 people and they also announced a new office in NYC with 2,000 people.

Lots of tech is spreading out. Facebook just took out a lease for over 100,000 sf on the four floors directly above my office in our building to employ 600 people.

Lots of tech is following millennials as they congregate into larger urban areas around the country. I know Chicago has benefited immensely from this. Employment in the Chicago loop is up by 95,018 in only six years, that's 20% growth.
Yeah I get all that, Amazon already has 30,000 employees in the Bay Area, the vast majority being engineers, spread out over several locations including DT San Francisco and their huge campus in Sunnyvale, I just found this new office down in Santa Cruz to be interesting and they arent very forthcoming about what projects theyre working on. Inquiring minds want to know. LOL.
 
Old 10-12-2017, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
760 posts, read 588,107 times
Reputation: 1482
^ This is exactly why I think that Amazon knows exactly where it wants to put a campus. They have already been to every city for smaller projects, scoped out the real estate, hired locally, and have actively participated in the local business enviroment. This even includes all of the new distribution centers they have opened all over the country.

They aren't stupid, they know what each city offers in amenities and work force.

The "Not everyone wants to live in the North West", comment is interesting. So I would expect a complete opposite (tech city) location from Seattle. Which makes me believe it doesn't have to go to a far left, progressive, mountainous, outdoorsy, millennial haven city like Portland, Austin (just not mountainous), Denver, Minneapolis, etc. Knowing how bad their turn over rate is currently, maybe they want to have diversity in their locations by also having a more traditional, suburban location (Phoenix, Charlotte, Dallas, Atlanta, DC) that will be able to retain an older workforce, or those with families. Think about it from a hiring prospective. You want to be able to offer two different locations that could appeal to anyone. Either come to the mid sized, liberal, expensive, outdoorsy, Seattle, or.... ____?
 
Old 10-12-2017, 09:22 AM
 
29,873 posts, read 27,324,185 times
Reputation: 18427
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN_Ski View Post
^ This is exactly why I think that Amazon knows exactly where it wants to put a campus. They have already been to every city for smaller projects, scoped out the real estate, hired locally, and have actively participated in the local business enviroment. This even includes all of the new distribution centers they have opened all over the country.

They aren't stupid, they know what each city offers in amenities and work force.

The "Not everyone wants to live in the North West", comment is interesting. So I would expect a complete opposite (tech city) location from Seattle. Which makes me believe it doesn't have to go to a far left, progressive, mountainous, outdoorsy, millennial haven city like Portland, Austin (just not mountainous), Denver, Minneapolis, etc. Knowing how bad their turn over rate is currently, maybe they want to have diversity in their locations by also having a more traditional, suburban location (Phoenix, Charlotte, Dallas, Atlanta, DC) that will be able to retain an older workforce, or those with families. Think about it from a hiring prospective. You want to be able to offer two different locations that could appeal to anyone. Either come to the mid sized, liberal, expensive, outdoorsy, Seattle, or.... ____?
You consider DC to be "a more traditional, suburban location" in line with those other cities? I'm guessing you may be thinking of NoVA in particular.
 
Old 10-12-2017, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
760 posts, read 588,107 times
Reputation: 1482
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
You consider DC to be "a more traditional, suburban location" in line with those other cities? I'm guessing you may be thinking of NoVA in particular.
DC always comes up in this discussion, but I didn't have a specific location. Your right, it's not a traditional/suburban location, but I guess I just lumped it into that category because it's on the East Coast and part of a massive, sprawling, population center.

I just think of it as the complete opposite of the trendy, outdoorsy, mid sized tech cities.
 
Old 10-12-2017, 09:47 AM
 
4,477 posts, read 2,659,202 times
Reputation: 4083
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
Yeah I get all that, Amazon already has 30,000 employees in the Bay Area, the vast majority being engineers, spread out over several locations including DT San Francisco and their huge campus in Sunnyvale, I just found this new office down in Santa Cruz to be interesting and they arent very forthcoming about what projects theyre working on. Inquiring minds want to know. LOL.
I believe the vast majority are warehouse and other non-tech jobs. But still thousands of actual tech jobs.

Sunnyvale appears to be one or two buildings, nothing major. What other than Lab 126?
 
Old 10-12-2017, 09:54 AM
 
29,873 posts, read 27,324,185 times
Reputation: 18427
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN_Ski View Post
DC always comes up in this discussion, but I didn't have a specific location. Your right, it's not a traditional/suburban location, but I guess I just lumped it into that category because it's on the East Coast and part of a massive, sprawling, population center.

I just think of it as the complete opposite of the trendy, outdoorsy, mid sized tech cities.
Well it's certainly trendy in certain respects...not really outdoorsy or mid-sized though, but neither are cities like Boston, Philly, etc.
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