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View Poll Results: Where?
New York City 16 3.10%
Greater Boston 32 6.20%
Philly 38 7.36%
DC/N. Virginia 50 9.69%
Raleigh/NC Research Triangle 32 6.20%
Austin 48 9.30%
San Francisco/Bay Area/Silicon Valley 13 2.52%
Baltimore 11 2.13%
Toronto 33 6.40%
Pittsburgh 35 6.78%
Chicago 99 19.19%
Atlanta 109 21.12%
Voters: 516. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-16-2017, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
760 posts, read 590,462 times
Reputation: 1482

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The other strike against Denver, and possibly even Austin, is that they want to seek a city that is not like Seattle. Their comment of "not everyone lives in the north west" was interesting. It shows that they are not having that kind of success they are looking for when relocating employees. Seattle is a liberal, outdoorsy, expensive, trendy, yuppie/hipster, "non mild weather", city. If you had to group every city in the US in say...4 different groups, Denver would be grouped in with Seattle.

It makes sense that they would want two cities with different cultures, values, lifestyle, and weather. I'm sure a city without rain/snow, or simply one in the south with year round heat, would be a good way to attract talent. Also not every Amazon employee is some liberal, techie, hipster. I'm sure there are plenty of older people with families that would like to live in more of a affordable, suburban, enviroment (Arizona, Texas, North Carolina, Georgia, Florida, etc).

So I would lay out Amazons wants/needs in three categories:

1 - Subsidies
2 - Amenities (Airport, transit, land/campus)
3 - Lifestyle (opposite of Seattle)

This leaves me with a hutch for Texas, Georgia, and North Carolina.

They also want a place that has strong STEM high school presence, which all three are recognized for.

 
Old 10-16-2017, 09:22 AM
 
1,593 posts, read 835,022 times
Reputation: 1220
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN_Ski View Post
The other strike against Denver, and possibly even Austin, is that they want to seek a city that is not like Seattle. Their comment of "not everyone lives in the north west" was interesting. It shows that they are not having that kind of success they are looking for when relocating employees. Seattle is a liberal, outdoorsy, expensive, trendy, yuppie/hipster, "non mild weather", city. If you had to group every city in the US in say...4 different groups, Denver would be grouped in with Seattle.

It makes sense that they would want two cities with different cultures, values, lifestyle, and weather. I'm sure a city without rain/snow, or simply one in the south with year round heat, would be a good way to attract talent. Also not every Amazon employee is some liberal, techie, hipster. I'm sure there are plenty of older people with families that would like to live in more of a affordable, suburban, enviroment (Arizona, Texas, North Carolina, Georgia, Florida, etc).

So I would lay out Amazons wants/needs in three categories:

1 - Subsidies
2 - Amenities (Airport, transit, land/campus)
3 - Lifestyle (opposite of Seattle)

This leaves me with a hutch for Texas, Georgia, and North Carolina.

They also want a place that has strong STEM high school presence, which all three are recognized for.

Who Knows, maybe they want a similar culture, value, lifstyle
 
Old 10-16-2017, 09:36 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,124 posts, read 35,061,639 times
Reputation: 15314
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN_Ski View Post
The other strike against Denver, and possibly even Austin, is that they want to seek a city that is not like Seattle. Their comment of "not everyone lives in the north west" was interesting. It shows that they are not having that kind of success they are looking for when relocating employees. Seattle is a liberal, outdoorsy, expensive, trendy, yuppie/hipster, "non mild weather", city. If you had to group every city in the US in say...4 different groups, Denver would be grouped in with Seattle.

It makes sense that they would want two cities with different cultures, values, lifestyle, and weather. I'm sure a city without rain/snow, or simply one in the south with year round heat, would be a good way to attract talent. Also not every Amazon employee is some liberal, techie, hipster. I'm sure there are plenty of older people with families that would like to live in more of a affordable, suburban, enviroment (Arizona, Texas, North Carolina, Georgia, Florida, etc).

So I would lay out Amazons wants/needs in three categories:

1 - Subsidies
2 - Amenities (Airport, transit, land/campus)
3 - Lifestyle (opposite of Seattle)

This leaves me with a hutch for Texas, Georgia, and North Carolina.

They also want a place that has strong STEM high school presence, which all three are recognized for.
That's an interesting (and, I think, valid) take on things, MN. You could indeed infer from the highlighted statement that they want to go in a different direction with HQ2 in terms of culture and lifestyle.
Or it could be just another tease.
 
Old 10-16-2017, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
760 posts, read 590,462 times
Reputation: 1482
While it is nothing really confirmed, this statement is causing me to lean away from cities that are like Seattle:

Quote:
“Not everybody wants to live in the Northwest,” said Wilke during an onstage interview. “It’s been terrific for me and my family, but I think we may find another location that allows us to recruit a different collection of employees
 
Old 10-16-2017, 10:23 AM
 
224 posts, read 111,776 times
Reputation: 287
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN_Ski View Post
The other strike against Denver, and possibly even Austin, is that they want to seek a city that is not like Seattle. Their comment of "not everyone lives in the north west" was interesting. It shows that they are not having that kind of success they are looking for when relocating employees. Seattle is a liberal, outdoorsy, expensive, trendy, yuppie/hipster, "non mild weather", city. If you had to group every city in the US in say...4 different groups, Denver would be grouped in with Seattle.

It makes sense that they would want two cities with different cultures, values, lifestyle, and weather. I'm sure a city without rain/snow, or simply one in the south with year round heat, would be a good way to attract talent. Also not every Amazon employee is some liberal, techie, hipster. I'm sure there are plenty of older people with families that would like to live in more of a affordable, suburban, enviroment (Arizona, Texas, North Carolina, Georgia, Florida, etc).

So I would lay out Amazons wants/needs in three categories:

1 - Subsidies
2 - Amenities (Airport, transit, land/campus)
3 - Lifestyle (opposite of Seattle)

This leaves me with a hutch for Texas, Georgia, and North Carolina.

They also want a place that has strong STEM high school presence, which all three are recognized for.
Or he just meant it in the literal sense--geographically, not culturally. Obviously Amazon has contributed to whatever cultural standards we apply to Seattle, so, given its overall success, why would they want to deviate from that?
 
Old 10-16-2017, 10:24 AM
 
9,839 posts, read 11,442,607 times
Reputation: 2358
Here are the four sites D.C. is pitching for Amazon HQ2
 
Old 10-16-2017, 11:37 AM
 
4,490 posts, read 2,676,874 times
Reputation: 4104
The "opposite of Seattle" idea sounds very plausible. But I can imagine different types that fit that bill:
--Sunbelt urban core
--Northeast/Midwest urban core
--Suburban of either
--Toronto

Chicago would allow enormous growth without a ton of hurdles and without raising local prices very much.

Toronto would aid in foreign recruitment, already a huge factor in HQ1.

A Dallas type city has cheap land and would roll out the red carpet.
 
Old 10-16-2017, 04:53 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
760 posts, read 590,462 times
Reputation: 1482
Well this is convenient timing
Seattle leaders look to push ‘refresh’ button with Amazon


Was it all a game? A plot for a new Amazon Original series?
 
Old 10-16-2017, 06:23 PM
 
4,490 posts, read 2,676,874 times
Reputation: 4104
Some people in Seattle want to make things easier for Amazon. Others, like a city council proposal last week, want to establish a special tax on large employers.

Meanwhile we've been piling on fees for anything they or anyone else want to build. They're in the tens of millions for any major new building, with a big jump if they hadn't filed for a land use permit at a certain point.
 
Old 10-16-2017, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,552 posts, read 3,707,108 times
Reputation: 4152
I would hope the Seattle City Council will get their heads back in the game and realize that establishing a special tax on large employers is counter-productive, and is one of the reasons Amazon is looking for other options. Just plain stupidity, and why Boeing lost HQ to Chicago, though the State was also involved in that one.. I would hope these folks take a serious look at what they are voting for. But then my hope has nothing to do with their potentially damaging actions.
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