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View Poll Results: Where?
New York City 16 3.10%
Greater Boston 32 6.20%
Philly 38 7.36%
DC/N. Virginia 50 9.69%
Raleigh/NC Research Triangle 32 6.20%
Austin 48 9.30%
San Francisco/Bay Area/Silicon Valley 13 2.52%
Baltimore 11 2.13%
Toronto 33 6.40%
Pittsburgh 35 6.78%
Chicago 99 19.19%
Atlanta 109 21.12%
Voters: 516. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-07-2017, 08:27 PM
 
2,513 posts, read 2,265,374 times
Reputation: 1824

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post

As a personal protest if Amazon picks Tysons, VA I'm never buying a product from them again.
Hehe, why the protest because of Tysons? Capital One, Hilton, General Dynamics, Booz Allen and Freddie Mac are there for good company.

 
Old 09-07-2017, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,532 posts, read 3,683,135 times
Reputation: 4115
Interesting this thread has taken off big-time. Which tells me there are still problems with our economy that encourage companies like Amazon to put their wares out there for cities to consume and bid on. (pretty brilliant on Amazon's part) While our leaders like to criticize Amazon, it is apparent that they are indeed coveted as a company that could come in and offer a lot to any given community. On one hand it is exciting that cities are clamoring for Amazon, on the other hand, why has it come to this? Really. In a perfect world, cities would be thriving with their own industries. But today's society seems to have fewer options. Kind of liking throwing meat into the pen and seeing which animals can get the most. Pretty pathetic, but perhaps today's reality.
 
Old 09-07-2017, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,331 posts, read 3,052,638 times
Reputation: 3918
The more I think about this, the more I don't want the Twin Cities to get it.

1. 50,000 more yuppies will change the culture of the city. They will make it blander and more corporate.
2. They will bid up the cost of housing for everybody else.
3. That is a ton of jobs from one employer. Any city smaller than Atlanta or Dallas would become a company town and would have to do Amazon's bidding because they then wouldn't be able to afford to lose that many white collar jobs.
4. If/when Amazon is broken up for antitrust reasons it will likely be devastating to Seattle and headquarter city #2.
5. This is a solution looking for a problem. Minneapolis is fine the way it is. We don't need to change the city just to get a shiny new toy.
6. When I see what the tech economy has done to Seattle and the Bay Area, that is not a model I want to follow. Formerly interesting, bohemian cities are turning into tech monocultures where the rich live well and everybody else either moves away or lives like crap. They are much less interesting places than they used to be.
 
Old 09-07-2017, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Northeast states
10,674 posts, read 8,182,570 times
Reputation: 2898
Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
Interesting this thread has taken off big-time. Which tells me there are still problems with our economy that encourage companies like Amazon to put their wares out there for cities to consume and bid on. (pretty brilliant on Amazon's part) While our leaders like to criticize Amazon, it is apparent that they are indeed coveted as a company that could come in and offer a lot to any given community. On one hand it is exciting that cities are clamoring for Amazon, on the other hand, why has it come to this? Really. In a perfect world, cities would be thriving with their own industries. But today's society seems to have fewer options. Kind of liking throwing meat into the pen and seeing which animals can get the most. Pretty pathetic, but perhaps today's reality.

Same if Uber want second headquarters cities around country are getting thirsty lol
 
Old 09-07-2017, 08:47 PM
 
311 posts, read 218,319 times
Reputation: 342
Quote:
Originally Posted by RightonWalnut View Post
This is a HUGE part of the RFP... especially the bolded section. I would say this rules out Bay Area, DC and NYC as HQ2 considerations if they're looking for cities with flights TO these places. With these requirements in place, I would say the top 5 considerations are going to be:

Chicago, Philadelphia, Boston, Atlanta and Dallas/Fort Worth in no specific order. For Canada, Toronto and Montreal.

Honorable mentions but will likely not get the HQ2 will be Pittsburgh, Miami, Nashville, Baltimore, Atlanta, Memphis, Austin, Houston, Charlotte, Detroit, Minneapolis, etc. All of these cities don't offer everything Amazon is seeking. I'm also unsure if they would be able to handle the infrastructure required to accommodate adding 8 million square feet of office space, and 50,000 employees in 9 short years.
Does Philly offer daily direct flights to NYC tho?
 
Old 09-07-2017, 08:47 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
5,642 posts, read 7,444,233 times
Reputation: 4315
Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
Interesting this thread has taken off big-time. Which tells me there are still problems with our economy that encourage companies like Amazon to put their wares out there for cities to consume and bid on. (pretty brilliant on Amazon's part) While our leaders like to criticize Amazon, it is apparent that they are indeed coveted as a company that could come in and offer a lot to any given community. On one hand it is exciting that cities are clamoring for Amazon, on the other hand, why has it come to this? Really. In a perfect world, cities would be thriving with their own industries. But today's society seems to have fewer options. Kind of liking throwing meat into the pen and seeing which animals can get the most. Pretty pathetic, but perhaps today's reality.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
The more I think about this, the more I don't want the Twin Cities to get it.

1. 50,000 more yuppies will change the culture of the city. They will make it blander and more corporate.
2. They will bid up the cost of housing for everybody else.
3. That is a ton of jobs from one employer. Any city smaller than Atlanta or Dallas would become a company town and would have to do Amazon's bidding because they then wouldn't be able to afford to lose that many white collar jobs.
4. If/when Amazon is broken up for antitrust reasons it will likely be devastating to Seattle and headquarter city #2.
5. This is a solution looking for a problem. Minneapolis is fine the way it is. We don't need to change the city just to get a shiny new toy.
6. When I see what the tech economy has done to Seattle and the Bay Area, that is not a model I want to follow. Formerly interesting, bohemian cities are turning into tech monocultures where the rich live well and everybody else either moves away or lives like crap. They are much less interesting places than they used to be.
Valid points all-around.
 
Old 09-07-2017, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,111 posts, read 1,304,477 times
Reputation: 1825
Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
Interesting this thread has taken off big-time. Which tells me there are still problems with our economy that encourage companies like Amazon to put their wares out there for cities to consume and bid on. (pretty brilliant on Amazon's part) While our leaders like to criticize Amazon, it is apparent that they are indeed coveted as a company that could come in and offer a lot to any given community. On one hand it is exciting that cities are clamoring for Amazon, on the other hand, why has it come to this? Really. In a perfect world, cities would be thriving with their own industries. But today's society seems to have fewer options. Kind of liking throwing meat into the pen and seeing which animals can get the most. Pretty pathetic, but perhaps today's reality.
I was just going to say this thread is really blowing up. People here really seem to want this Amazon HQ to come to their city really badly! At first I was wondering why people care so much, like everybody wants to work for Amazon all the sudden. But I think you explained it well.
 
Old 09-07-2017, 08:52 PM
 
311 posts, read 218,319 times
Reputation: 342
Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
Interesting this thread has taken off big-time. Which tells me there are still problems with our economy that encourage companies like Amazon to put their wares out there for cities to consume and bid on. (pretty brilliant on Amazon's part) While our leaders like to criticize Amazon, it is apparent that they are indeed coveted as a company that could come in and offer a lot to any given community. On one hand it is exciting that cities are clamoring for Amazon, on the other hand, why has it come to this? Really. In a perfect world, cities would be thriving with their own industries. But today's society seems to have fewer options. Kind of liking throwing meat into the pen and seeing which animals can get the most. Pretty pathetic, but perhaps today's reality.
But we did have more city specialization before and that's what led so many cities to go down (see Detroit, Automobile). Today's cities aspire somewhat to specific industries but also look for diversity to avoid meltdowns like the ones experienced by Rust Belt and post-industrial cities.
 
Old 09-07-2017, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,111 posts, read 1,304,477 times
Reputation: 1825
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjv007 View Post
Does Philly offer daily direct flights to NYC tho?
They actually do, but you'd probably spend more time at the airport than the actual flight itself. I don't understand why anyone would do this.
 
Old 09-07-2017, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Montreal/Miami/Toronto
973 posts, read 633,154 times
Reputation: 1030
Quote:
Originally Posted by PghYinzer View Post
Maybe off topic, but all of those house hunter shows on TV show Toronto as a city where the people end up dropping like $800k on a small duplex that needs a full renovation. Is that accurate? I would think that since Seattle has become so expensive, that COL would play somewhat of a factor.
It's pretty accurate. Toronto is a Chinese investors paradise and is built on speculation, it's pretty remarkable. My friend sold his run down house for nearly $1.5M, he bought it for I think $300K? I don't remember, but it's about 20min from downtown and yeah... Expensive as hell to live there honestly.
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