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View Poll Results: Where?
New York City 16 3.10%
Greater Boston 32 6.20%
Philly 38 7.36%
DC/N. Virginia 50 9.69%
Raleigh/NC Research Triangle 32 6.20%
Austin 48 9.30%
San Francisco/Bay Area/Silicon Valley 13 2.52%
Baltimore 11 2.13%
Toronto 33 6.40%
Pittsburgh 35 6.78%
Chicago 99 19.19%
Atlanta 109 21.12%
Voters: 516. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-15-2017, 07:26 AM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,182,008 times
Reputation: 7739

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https://medium.com/migration-issues/...n-effda4edc00f




"But here’s the thing. These best-scoring cities barely crack 50% of possible points. Philadelphia tops out at 56%."

 
Old 09-15-2017, 08:23 AM
 
Location: London, UK
3,458 posts, read 4,011,574 times
Reputation: 2661
Quote:
Originally Posted by eevee View Post
Are these legitimate options that the city has proposed or are they just large parcels of space you think could work? I think Volpe is being developed as mostly residential and Inner Belt is just blah. It's the part of Somerville that honestly holds little to no appeal, hence why it's still kind of run down (if I'm getting the area right, there's not much around there but highway overpasses and a couple of rinky-dink shopping plazas). Government Center is also very blah with some world-renowned ugly buildings that Amazon may not want to deal with.

If this had been announced 10-15 years ago, then a spot like Station Landing in Medford, Assembly Sq in Somerville, or maybe even South Boston before it got super hot and developed would have been good options. These spots have all been nabbed though and I can only assume any similar areas left will come at quite the cost. Heck, Harvard has always been notorious at snapping up property and land and many of the other universities do so as well.

It still doesn't address the housing issue however and housing in Boston is at quite the premium. I can easily see it turning into a problem similar to what's happening in San Francisco. The city doesn't really have any more space to build out and it can't build up past a certain point. It'll push workers into the 'burbs/inner belt and cancel out the benefits of choosing Boston in the first place.
They are all viable options that are slated for redevelopment already. I would imagine at least a few of them will be included in the bid to Amazon. Also you cant look at how the area looks now, its more about what Amazon could turn it into. Government Center for example is slated to become this: Government Center Garage Redevelopment | Boston Planning & Development Agency

The Pelli tower would be a perfect starting point for Amazon.

Where could Amazon fit 50,000 workers if it comes to Boston? - The Boston Globe

Yes housing is a problem, but there are places to build and the Walsh administration has done a pretty decent job of creating new housing units. Especially in places like Dorchester that has room to grow.
 
Old 09-15-2017, 08:32 AM
 
Location: London, UK
3,458 posts, read 4,011,574 times
Reputation: 2661
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Burns View Post
Map time:



Let's get the obvious out of the way first, Amazon likely wants an east coast headquarters. So this rules out west coast cities - Vancouver, SF, and LA.

Amazon would likely prefer to be in the EST time zone for its second HQ. Denver is MDT. AKA it's too far west. So out goes Denver.

Then you rule out the randy cities, your Kansas City, Indianapolis, Minneapolis, Nashville, Ottawa, Montreal (language reasons), Pittsburg, and Detroit.

So that leaves: Boston, Philadelphia, Chicago, NYC, Toronto, Washington, and Atlanta.

We can rule out:

Boston - As others have mentioned, it's a costly labor market that's stretched thin, with no space for development of this size close to the core.

NYC - Similar issues to Boston.

Washington - Amazon in a government town?


And we're left with Philadelphia, Chicago, Toronto, and Atlanta. This I think will come down who gives the biggest incentives. Chicago's dire financial state is a disadvantage. Philly is also unlikely but could be the wild card.

So Toronto or Atlanta.

Some will cite Toronto being in Canada as a disadvantage, but Amazon specified "North America" in the RFP. Heck it might be a hint. If they wanted to limit it to the US, they would have specified only the US.
Washington is hardly just a government town. There has been a huge successful effort to raise its tech profile and diversify the economy. Plus there is more than enough room for Amazon to grow there.

NYC is NYC. You never have an issue attracting talent to a place like NYC. Plus we have seen than NYC can always reinvent itself and find places to grow. Its a monster that continues to evolve.

Boston's labor market is stretched because its at near full employment.

The thing is that the schools in Boston constantly pump out talent. There are just never enough jobs to keep these kids in the city. Plus these are top tier grads who basically can pick and choose where they want to live in the world. Places like NYC, London, Shanghai, SF, etc...will always poach them. Enter Amazon though and you have an additional reason to stick around for at least a few years, which is what Amazon wants and needs to grow.

Plus top tier tech talent typically starts at $100-150k anyways, so it isnt like that is a bad salary, even for places like Boston, NYC, DC and SF.
https://www.glassdoor.com/Salary/Ama...ries-E6036.htm
 
Old 09-15-2017, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,179 posts, read 11,803,134 times
Reputation: 32193
I think if Amazon were solely interested in Eastern time zone locations, they would have just said that in the RFP. It doesn't make sense for them to have locations across the country waste all the time and effort to put together proposals that have no chance.

Personally, I think that once they go through the initial screening process, financial incentives being offered will play a bigger role than time zone.
 
Old 09-15-2017, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
760 posts, read 590,462 times
Reputation: 1482
A much better analysis than that one of the NYT:
https://medium.com/migration-issues/...n-effda4edc00f

It goes beyond the "these cities have an airport, train, and tech employees".
 
Old 09-15-2017, 09:13 AM
 
2,166 posts, read 1,466,330 times
Reputation: 2176
Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
I think if Amazon were solely interested in Eastern time zone locations, they would have just said that in the RFP. It doesn't make sense for them to have locations across the country waste all the time and effort to put together proposals that have no chance.

Personally, I think that once they go through the initial screening process, financial incentives being offered will play a bigger role than time zone.
Well, it doesn't cost them anything to get proposals from all over, so that's probably why they didn't specify. Also they like the publicity all over and the feeling of power it gives them no doubt. I'd guess the odds it will be in the east are about 90%. if they got a fantastic offer from a city/state in the central time zone, that was much better than anything in the east, they might go with it assuming it meets most of their criteria.
 
Old 09-15-2017, 09:18 AM
 
1,955 posts, read 1,947,970 times
Reputation: 1755
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Burns View Post
Map time:
Let's get the obvious out of the way first, Amazon likely wants an east coast headquarters. So this rules out west coast cities - Vancouver, SF, and LA.

...

And we're left with Philadelphia, Chicago, Toronto, and Atlanta. This I think will come down who gives the biggest incentives. Chicago's dire financial state is a disadvantage. Philly is also unlikely but could be the wild card.

So Toronto or Atlanta.

Some will cite Toronto being in Canada as a disadvantage, but Amazon specified "North America" in the RFP. Heck it might be a hint. If they wanted to limit it to the US, they would have specified only the US.
Employing 50.000 people in Chicago or Philly means the odds of a significant number of those 50.000 employees becoming a victim of some serious crime are way over 100 percent. The same applies in a lesser to degree to Atlanta as well. Why would any company willfully make such a decision and risk their employees safety? It doesn't make sense. So Toronto it is although I'm sure there are plenty of reasonably safe and otherwise viable options in the US too like Seattle, Boston, San Diego, or Austin.
 
Old 09-15-2017, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
8,702 posts, read 11,941,393 times
Reputation: 3574
Quote:
Originally Posted by drro View Post
Employing 50.000 people in Chicago or Philly means the odds of a significant number of those 50.000 employees becoming a victim of some serious crime are way over 100 percent. The same applies in a lesser to degree to Atlanta as well. Why would any company willfully make such a decision and risk their employees safety? It doesn't make sense. So Toronto it is although I'm sure there are plenty of reasonably safe and otherwise viable options in the US too like Seattle, Boston, San Diego, or Austin.
You guys are pretty dramatic hahaha

I'll make sure I'm watching out for all that crime while I'm living in Center City Philadelphia, walking to work everyday by parks, Lamborghini's, Rolls Royce's, Bentley's, Multi-million dollar condominiums in my $2000 suit to my 6-figure job in a shiny, glass, office tower.

Nobody is suggesting Amazon locate to North Philadelphia or Southside Chicago.

The site that would best fit Amazon (at least in Philadelphia), would be Schuylkill Yards, which sits on the Schuylkill River, next to 30th Street Station, the 3rd busiest rail station in the country, on the edge of University City where UPenn, Drexel, Penn Medicine, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, University City Science Center, the IRS, several shiny, shard glass skyscrapers that house several large companies including Nasdaq, FMC, Spark Therapeutics.... a site that sits across from Center City, one of the largest and best Downtown's in the country. Across the river, they will be able to see the Schuylkill River trail, Aramark's headquarters, two shiny glass Comcast skyscrapers, etc. This is an entirely safe place. Stop being so dramatic!

PS- Atlanta has a higher crime rate than Philadelphia.

PS part 2 - if the odds of being the victim of a violent crime in Philadelphia are less than 1% per 100,000 people, at 0.485%, that means, all 50,000 of those employees, have a less than 1% chance of being the victim of a violent crime.

Last edited by RightonWalnut; 09-15-2017 at 09:30 AM..
 
Old 09-15-2017, 09:27 AM
 
29,946 posts, read 27,415,389 times
Reputation: 18529
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN_Ski View Post
A much better analysis than that one of the NYT:
https://medium.com/migration-issues/...n-effda4edc00f

It goes beyond the "these cities have an airport, train, and tech employees".
Now THAT'S what you call an analysis.
 
Old 09-15-2017, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Sweet Home Chicago!
5,188 posts, read 3,724,967 times
Reputation: 6098
Quote:
Originally Posted by drro View Post
Employing 50.000 people in Chicago or Philly means the odds of a significant number of those 50.000 employees becoming a victim of some serious crime are way over 100 percent. The same applies in a lesser to degree to Atlanta as well. Why would any company willfully make such a decision and risk their employees safety? It doesn't make sense. So Toronto it is although I'm sure there are plenty of reasonably safe and otherwise viable options in the US too like Seattle, Boston, San Diego, or Austin.
Don't know where you got your stats or math skills from? If we're ruling out cities on crime stats, DC and Atlanta are out! Here are the top 100 most dangerous cities in the US. *Chicago didn't even make the list.

Moderator cut: Link removed, linking to competitor sites is not allowed

or if you want to focus on homicides.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/niallmc.../#8d58a0550da1


Last edited by Yac; 09-27-2017 at 06:51 AM..
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