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Old 03-17-2018, 02:31 PM
 
2,006 posts, read 1,020,568 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Last Starfighter View Post
Agree. All fair points to make consodering the advantages. I had a great time in Duluth swimming in Superior. But then again, we had to wait a number of weeks, in the summer mind you, to catch a warm sunny day that would make it comfortable.


I think the biggest thing that holds back the Lakes from being in the mix with these three, is the inclement beach-going weather. That and the abomidable pollution that has built up in the Lakes over the decades. I've studied the latter extensively, and it's really a major factor to consider when either swimming in, or eating fish out of them. Of course Superior is the cleanest and Ontario is the dirtiest in this regard. And yes, the levels have gotten lower in recent history. Still, the longstanding mining run-off and heavy metals and PCBs make every Great Lake much less appealing.


But anyway, to each their own. I'm a genuine longtime fan of the Great Lakes, just not to your own level, and not as a beach destination.
There are polluted ocean beaches, though, too, but I'm sure you know that.
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Old 03-17-2018, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,549 posts, read 712,907 times
Reputation: 1993
I think the relevance of the "coasts" is overstated to begin with. Sure, cities are generally centers of culture and commerce, but that's just as true for inland cities. To the extent that cities on the coast are any more high-culture than other cities, taking their sizes into account, it's only because coastal scenery is often considered "desirable", which means higher costs of living, which means a more elite crowd is attracted - but that's also true with certain scenic inland cities like Denver.

I'm about to move from my hometown of Chicago to DC, and I'm excited about it, but I'd be just as excited if I were going to Albuquerque or Buffalo or Atlanta. I just want to get out of the Midwest and establish a life in a truly new place while I'm young, but I'm not particularly attracted to the ocean or anything our culture has decided to associate with it.
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Old 03-17-2018, 03:05 PM
 
3,223 posts, read 1,555,479 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Last Starfighter View Post
Agree. All fair points to make consodering the advantages. I had a great time in Duluth swimming in Superior. But then again, we had to wait a number of weeks, in the summer mind you, to catch a warm sunny day that would make it comfortable.


I think the biggest thing that holds back the Lakes from being in the mix with these three, is the inclement beach-going weather. That and the abomidable pollution that has built up in the Lakes over the decades. I've studied the latter extensively, and it's really a major factor to consider when either swimming in, or eating fish out of them. Of course Superior is the cleanest and Ontario is the dirtiest in this regard. And yes, the levels have gotten lower in recent history. Still, the longstanding mining run-off and heavy metals and PCBs make every Great Lake much less appealing.

But anyway, to each their own. I'm a genuine longtime fan of the Great Lakes, just not to your own level, and not as a beach destination.
Lake Erie has the brunt of issues like Algae blooms now yearly. The other Great Lakes are spared. Chicago has far less issues then even a decade ago and doesn't get plagued by these Algae blooms in Lake Michigan and Superior and Huron. Chicago reversed its river to spare Lake Michigan back in a day and its drinking water. Today you can fish in the river too right downtown Chicago even and of course, the Lake.

All know the Great Lakes region have winters that are not for the beach. So does most of the Atlantic coast.

No one says the Florida Gulf Coast is underrated. It clearly has white sands and blue waters we love....
I wasn't claiming better beaches when I mentioned the Great Lakes either. Merely another Coast and that post that called Gulf Coast likened to the Mediterranean coast... that was a bit off I'd say.... outside of Florida.

Overall the Great Lakes are seen as clean. Again Lake Erie got the worst pollution and being the most shallow makes it worst.

I still get amazed by Chicago beaches in such a urban setting and clear blue waters. No real smell of the ocean or Florida white sands.... but not bad at all for 1000 miles inland.
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Old 03-17-2018, 05:20 PM
 
29,944 posts, read 27,386,421 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
To the extent that cities on the coast are any more high-culture than other cities, taking their sizes into account, it's only because coastal scenery is often considered "desirable", which means higher costs of living, which means a more elite crowd is attracted - but that's also true with certain scenic inland cities like Denver.
Except the major East Coast cities (in the mid-Atlantic/Northeast) aren't actually oceanfront cities. DC, Baltimore, and Philly aren't even located on the Atlantic Coast. I don't think any of the most desirable neighborhoods in Boston, NYC, Philly, Baltimore, or DC even have coastal views. All of those cities are centered on bays or rivers with direct connections to the Atlantic (for commercial purposes obviously) as opposed to being situated directly along the coast.

They are considered "high-culture" because they have been big cities for a long time and have developed well-regarded legacy cultural institutions as a result.
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Old 03-17-2018, 06:22 PM
 
4,486 posts, read 2,672,469 times
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"Coastal" is as much about looking overseas, being visited from overseas, etc. as it is about the actual coast. A coastal city has crowds of people speaking overseas languages in its downtown. There's no clear line on that, but generally cities on the Pacific and Atlantic seem to punch above their weight on those things, and cities on the Great Lakes and Gulf punch below their weight. Even Chicago, for all its greatness.
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Old 03-17-2018, 06:40 PM
 
2,006 posts, read 1,020,568 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
"Coastal" is as much about looking overseas, being visited from overseas, etc. as it is about the actual coast. A coastal city has crowds of people speaking overseas languages in its downtown. There's no clear line on that, but generally cities on the Pacific and Atlantic seem to punch above their weight on those things, and cities on the Great Lakes and Gulf punch below their weight. Even Chicago, for all its greatness.
First time I've ever heard "coastal" defined by crowds of people speaking different languages. Sometimes, you need to read it, to believe it. And, then, you still can't. Where are these "crowds of people" speaking overseas languages in Greenville and Lexington SC., or in Beaufort, NC.....and on, and on, and so forth. You get the picture.
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Old 03-17-2018, 06:45 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,575 posts, read 3,667,513 times
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We seem to be inventing definitions on the fly.
Is it a coast? Yes.
Does it have big waves? Yes and no...depending on weather and tides.
Is it Mediterranean-like, being somewhat contained by a continental landmass? Yes.
Does it have Mediterranean-like "grandeur" that comes from continental plates crashing into each other? No.
Do the coastal cities have some focus directed overseas? Yes...perhaps diminished in comparison to parts of the Atlantic and Pacific coasts but also more focused toward the south.
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Old 03-17-2018, 07:09 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,282,037 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Last Starfighter View Post
Does it have Mediterranean-like weather?

A resounding N.O.
You're right, the Gulf's weather is even better.

Last edited by Texyn; 03-17-2018 at 07:23 PM..
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Old 03-17-2018, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,099 posts, read 4,737,517 times
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Is the Gulf a real coast in terms of ocean-front? Yes. It is America's real third coast. It's just not as over-populated as the other two.
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Old 03-17-2018, 07:23 PM
 
3,223 posts, read 1,555,479 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
You're right, the Gulf's weather is even better.
OK ... Sarcasm or Satire right.... One never knows.
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