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Old 03-18-2018, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,508 posts, read 700,817 times
Reputation: 1941

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Except the major East Coast cities (in the mid-Atlantic/Northeast) aren't actually oceanfront cities. DC, Baltimore, and Philly aren't even located on the Atlantic Coast. I don't think any of the most desirable neighborhoods in Boston, NYC, Philly, Baltimore, or DC even have coastal views. All of those cities are centered on bays or rivers with direct connections to the Atlantic (for commercial purposes obviously) as opposed to being situated directly along the coast.

They are considered "high-culture" because they have been big cities for a long time and have developed well-regarded legacy cultural institutions as a result.
But that only applies to the Northeast Megalopolis. Cities and towns in New England past Boston, or in the South on the Atlantic, usually are not big or at least haven't been big for a long time.

I'll give you that my focus on scenery was probably misplaced, but my point is that I'm skeptical of the validity of the East Coast as a distinct cultural unit (the West Coast could maybe be one, but it's not part of the same thing as the East Coast). They're both just geographical regions that happen to have a lot of cities, many of which are not particularly old.
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Old 03-18-2018, 08:34 AM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,138,839 times
Reputation: 7737
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Except the major East Coast cities (in the mid-Atlantic/Northeast) aren't actually oceanfront cities. DC, Baltimore, and Philly aren't even located on the Atlantic Coast. I don't think any of the most desirable neighborhoods in Boston, NYC, Philly, Baltimore, or DC even have coastal views. All of those cities are centered on bays or rivers with direct connections to the Atlantic (for commercial purposes obviously) as opposed to being situated directly along the coast.

They are considered "high-culture" because they have been big cities for a long time and have developed well-regarded legacy cultural institutions as a result.


Mutiny you are a voice of reason generally in Gulf (sea) of drivel
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Old 03-18-2018, 09:34 AM
 
29,873 posts, read 27,324,185 times
Reputation: 18426
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
But that only applies to the Northeast Megalopolis. Cities and towns in New England past Boston, or in the South on the Atlantic, usually are not big or at least haven't been big for a long time.
Right. I thought that was understood.

Quote:
I'll give you that my focus on scenery was probably misplaced, but my point is that I'm skeptical of the validity of the East Coast as a distinct cultural unit (the West Coast could maybe be one, but it's not part of the same thing as the East Coast). They're both just geographical regions that happen to have a lot of cities, many of which are not particularly old.
The East Coast cities ARE old. That's a big difference, and the cities are located in much closer proximity to each other.
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Old 03-18-2018, 11:04 AM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,277,280 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Last Starfighter View Post
Well Napoleon, since you clarified that, I think it's right funny that in your wildest fevered dreams, you'd ever deign to believe that anywhere else on the Gulf Coast outside of Florida, that sliver of Alabama or SPI, could possibly be worth ever building up, or that it will ever happen. You talking about Grand Isle there Dub-yuh? Bwahaha. When the rest gets built up...that's a larf.

Face it, the rest of the Gulf, outside of Florida and the above two exceptions sucks. Horribly.
Quote:
When the rest gets built up? Good luck waitin' on that, Mr. 10 gallon cowboy hat.
So we have ourselves a bet. You're certain there is no worth to it, whereas I feel that potential for success is ripe. Let's shake on it, and we'll see what comes through.

Dub-yuh? You mean that yank from corner of the country? You're firing shots like a stormtrooper, starfighter.

Quote:
But especially bud...wait for it....in "Texys". Port A is a joke, and Galveston is infamous for having one of the worst beaches in the U.S. Texas beaches have always sucked and will forever be sub-par. Since you wanna get cute, rebut that.
No need to. As you've admitted yourself, SPI is already great.

Last edited by Texyn; 03-18-2018 at 11:37 AM..
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Old 03-19-2018, 12:57 PM
 
8,789 posts, read 4,712,032 times
Reputation: 2030
Going to sound really dumb. Until we looked into living in Texas as a possibility I never knew Texas had beaches. They look super nice excited about visiting them.
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Old 03-19-2018, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Mars City
5,091 posts, read 2,136,536 times
Reputation: 7505
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Last Starfighter View Post
...That's the only decent beach on the entire Texas coast, and what's more it's extremely isolated. .. The whole entire coastal stretch of TX as of 2018 has precisely one fairly decent beach.
LOL Thanks for the laugh!
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Old 03-19-2018, 03:56 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,277,280 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Last Starfighter View Post
Glad you went into my postings to dig that up about SPI cowpoke. But it's too bad the rebuttal to that is so easily stated: That's the only decent beach on the entire Texas coast, and what's more it's extremely isolated.
Good work. But you've missed out on several important details there, Buzz.

That one decent beach? Extends 110+ miles up the shore as part of the longest barrier island on the planet, about a third of the entire Texas shoreline. And as other posters have alluded to, the other South Texas beaches (up to Port Aransas or so) are great as well. Add them in, and you have about half the state shoreline with great beaches.

Already a great start in going forward with the Gulf Coast master plan.

Quote:
And you sit here, like the quintessential Texas homer, and somehow proclaim through your oversized novelty ruby-colored glasses, there will be more development and things are going to get out built out in the future?
Yep.

Quote:
Bwahaha. Ok. It's a bet bud.


Quote:
I think your mind is playing tricks on you.
Nope, the Jedi have already gotten to you first. Their mind control is no joke.
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Old 03-19-2018, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MISSOURI
9,013 posts, read 2,726,253 times
Reputation: 6945
Quote:
Originally Posted by Facts Kill Rhetoric View Post
Well yeah, the Gulf of Mexico is like the Caribbean Sea, it is an arm of the Atlantic Ocean. It's apart of the ocean, I don't really see how on Earth this is even a real question.



Maybe people need to consult a map. Or perhaps go back to school and learn these things. (Not meant to be directed at you Tom Lennox 70) It is like asking if the Appalachian Mountains are real mountains when you compare it to the Rockies, Andes, and Alps. Yes, yes it is. Or like asking if the Mediterranean Sea is a real ocean and/or coast. Yes, yes it is.
And don't forget that Alaska has a coast on the Arctic Ocean, so maybe we should ask if THAT is a "real coast" too!
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Old 03-19-2018, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MISSOURI
9,013 posts, read 2,726,253 times
Reputation: 6945
Quote:
Originally Posted by RunD1987 View Post
Going to sound really dumb. Until we looked into living in Texas as a possibility I never knew Texas had beaches. They look super nice excited about visiting them.
You're right, that sounds dumb!
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Old 03-19-2018, 11:48 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,277,280 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Last Starfighter View Post
Port A is a great beach ONLY by Texas Standards there Woody.
Some very high standards indeed.

Quote:
Find me some non-Texans who would ever compare it to any other beach in Florida, or even on the east coast.
With the exception of Florida, and perhaps North Carolina, no state on the East Coast has beaches that match or top those of South Texas. So you're right about one thing, there's no comparison.

Quote:
SPI is the lone example of a decent beach in Texas. I'm quite sure many many NON-Texans agree with that perspective.

Hey, at least you guys have one!!
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You bet I like SPI Chuck, you bet. But it's no Pensacola Beach. Not remotely.
In the case of Florida, the advantage over Texas that people refer to mainly regards the sand: people like the color white. Even though Texas sands are browner in color, there are so many variations in colors for sands (i.e. black in parts of Hawaii, pink in Bermuda, etc) that this factor doesn't affect quality much for me.

I'll put South Texas beaches below those of peninsular Florida, but on-level of those of Pensacola/FL Panhandle. The FL Panhandle has whiter sand than South Texas, but the average water conditions are worse: less window of enjoyment in the year, and also bigger issues with algae outbreaks (i.e. june grass).

Quote:
You attempt to conflate the waters of SPI with the entire barrier island length, but we both know very well, that that just ain't even close being accurate or truthful. If it was, there would be many more SPIs dotted allong its waters. There's a very good reason you only see development along the extreme southern end of the Barrier Island. Its because the conditions are just not duplicated anywhere else.
Perhaps some areas there were set aside for nature, you know, like Padre Island National Seashore? Or maybe you missed out on details once again, like the swath of development on North Padre Island?

Quote:
I know its Texas soil and that pulls your heartstrings and all, but SPI has only Brownsville to fall back on, and Brownsville sorely lacks many many resources one specifically looks for directly adjacent to a beach town. A dedicated organic food market would be a prime example.
One of many issues that will be solved by investment.
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