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Old 09-12-2017, 12:00 AM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,826 posts, read 12,340,136 times
Reputation: 4779

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
Nowhere on the Gulf Coast has a truly defined, identifiable "beach scene." Sure, lots of popular, beautiful beaches all over the coast which draw tourist, but there just isn't some sort of large-scale brand and culture associated with the Gulf Coast beaches. This applies even to those sugar-white sand beaches on the FL Panhandle.

For example, the West Coast beach scene, centered on Los Angeles, has spawned entire TV shows, clothing lines (see: Hollister, TheHundreds, etc) well known across the US. You just don't have that from the Gulf yet.
It's just that the media seems to not focus on the beach scene here. Many people don't even realize Mississippi has a coastline for example. And yes many people did NOT read my first post carefully. I personally am wondering why so many in the media, when referring to "the coasts" don't really have the Gulf coast in mind. Once again I bring up the journalist who was in south Louisiana writing about the disconnect between Trump supporters here and "voters on the coasts" and "coastal voters" which she means California and the Northeast........
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Old 09-12-2017, 02:39 AM
 
274 posts, read 288,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bartonizer View Post
Only someone trolling to get a reaction out of others would not consider it to be a big deal. There's absolutely no reason to not consider it a major coast, and outside Wikipedia I've never even heard anyone refer to it as the "Third Coast."


Joe's Crab Shack had a "Third Coast" menu for a while which featured Cajun-type cuisine.


I know, not the highest quality rebuttal but there is some sort of meager Third Coast theme out there.
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Old 09-12-2017, 04:34 AM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
1,100 posts, read 1,075,580 times
Reputation: 1947
Quote:
Originally Posted by Felt38 View Post
Joe's Crab Shack had a "Third Coast" menu for a while which featured Cajun-type cuisine.


I know, not the highest quality rebuttal but there is some sort of meager Third Coast theme out there.
Well, I guess that's proof. But again, growing up in the Tampa Bay area (Clearwater) I'd never heard of a visitor or resident calling it the Third Coast. But then again, no one in central and southern Florida feels any kinship with panhandle FL, MS, AL, LA, or TX.

To answer the OP's question, I think it has to do with the fact that part of the coast is in middle of a rural, deeply Southern area- and away from major Population Centers. And the physical connection to the actual coast is often swampy and interrupted with large gaps between barrier islands.

Despite what a few others have posted, the beaches of central western and SW FL are very popular destinations, both domestically and abroad, with a special cachet with Europeans. They're known for being laid-back and quieter than their East coast counterparts, and cater more to families, retirees and the wealthy than other parts of the coast. And again, they have very little cultural connection to other parts of the Gulf Coast, as they identify much more with peninsular FL.

Back to the OP's comment, I also think that sometimes authors and newspeople visiting places like the bayous of Louisiana have never visited these places before and are personally surprised by what they encounter- and compare everything with their own NYC or LA points of reference. But they'd also be surprised by visiting a hole in the wall town in SC or OR.
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Old 09-12-2017, 06:20 AM
 
29,947 posts, read 27,424,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
I mean it's pretty self explanatory. It's cultural and political. "The Coasts" are where the big elite cities are. The Gulf coast doesn't have the major cities or the coastal elite culture so regardless of your political persuasion no one want to categorize them together.
I agree. It's a subject worth exploring but I wish the title of the thread were worded better so as to eliminate all the "what a dumb question" responses.
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Old 09-12-2017, 07:07 AM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,285,072 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
And yes many people did NOT read my first post carefully. I personally am wondering why so many in the media, when referring to "the coasts" don't really have the Gulf coast in mind. Once again I bring up the journalist who was in south Louisiana writing about the disconnect between Trump supporters here and "voters on the coasts" and "coastal voters" which she means California and the Northeast........
Quote:
Originally Posted by bartonizer View Post
Well, I guess that's proof. But again, growing up in the Tampa Bay area (Clearwater) I'd never heard of a visitor or resident calling it the Third Coast. But then again, no one in central and southern Florida feels any kinship with panhandle FL, MS, AL, LA, or TX.


To answer the OP's question, I think it has to do with the fact that part of the coast is in middle of a rural, deeply Southern area- and away from major Population Centers. And the physical connection to the actual coast is often swampy and interrupted with large gaps between barrier islands.
It's nothing to do with "ruralness," since many areas on the "two main coast" have plentiful such areas. Swampiness and gaps between barrier islands aren't an issue either, since those features are also present through the East Coast (especially the portion corresponding to the Southern Atlantic states). The answer is simply lack of large enough media market (and/or popularity) on that coast.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
It's just that the media seems to not focus on the beach scene here. Many people don't even realize Mississippi has a coastline for example.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bartonizer View Post
Despite what a few others have posted, the beaches of central western and SW FL are very popular destinations, both domestically and abroad, with a special cachet with Europeans. They're known for being laid-back and quieter than their East coast counterparts, and cater more to families, retirees and the wealthy than other parts of the coast. And again, they have very little cultural connection to other parts of the Gulf Coast, as they identify much more with peninsular FL.
Specifically about beaches, it's about the overall nature of the scene beyond just the popularity. The beaches of Alabama, Mississippi and Gulf Florida are well known destinations to the nation. But the scale of those beach scenes isn't to the point that entire clothing lines, brands, defined cultural atmospheres, etc are spawned from them. For instance, no clothing brand like LA's beach scene did with Hollister.

Last edited by Texyn; 09-12-2017 at 07:38 AM..
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Old 09-12-2017, 10:28 AM
 
5,456 posts, read 2,843,566 times
Reputation: 10250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
It's just that the media seems to not focus on the beach scene here. Many people don't even realize Mississippi has a coastline for example. And yes many people did NOT read my first post carefully. I personally am wondering why so many in the media, when referring to "the coasts" don't really have the Gulf coast in mind. Once again I bring up the journalist who was in south Louisiana writing about the disconnect between Trump supporters here and "voters on the coasts" and "coastal voters" which she means California and the Northeast........

The media fixates on the sensational stuff. Beautiful sunny days on sugar sand beaches, and hundreds of shorebirds flocking are not shock-inducing. Birders and boaters and seafood lovers consider the Gulf Coast a real coast.

If that journalist is using "coasts" when she means CA and the Northeast, she is a lazy and inaccurate speaker.
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Old 09-12-2017, 11:15 AM
 
4,011 posts, read 2,532,039 times
Reputation: 1967
Its not a real coast. The only real coast in the US is around Florida. A real coast has warm water, nice sand and blue or clear water
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Old 09-12-2017, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
1,100 posts, read 1,075,580 times
Reputation: 1947
Quote:
Originally Posted by fieldm View Post
Its not a real coast. The only real coast in the US is around Florida. A real coast has warm water, nice sand and blue or clear water
What do you consider the half of Florida that fits that description, but faces the Gulf of Mexico? Just curious. My feeling is that people just generally refer to Florida as Florida, and use Atlantic side or Gulf side to further describe it.
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Old 09-12-2017, 11:24 AM
 
4,011 posts, read 2,532,039 times
Reputation: 1967
Quote:
Originally Posted by bartonizer View Post
What do you consider the half of Florida that fits that description, but faces the Gulf of Mexico?
Great statement and agree with you. From Pensocola to Destin, etc are perfect beaches by US standards. White sand, warm water, pure white sand and it just feels like paradise. This portion is definitely a real coast but Im not sure about the Louisiana and Galvestion sections of the Gulf. Sure they have the sand, water and warm water but I'm sure the average person would rather go to a beach on the Gulf in FL than in TX/LA
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Old 09-12-2017, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Mars City
5,091 posts, read 2,150,950 times
Reputation: 7505
Quote:
Originally Posted by fieldm View Post
Its not a real coast. The only real coast in the US is around Florida. A real coast has warm water, nice sand and blue or clear water
LOL It doesn't matter what an area looks like, or if an area meets someone's perfecting requirements. If it's a coast, it's a coast.

That's like saying brussels sprouts isn't a food, just because someone doesn't like it. That's nonsense, and follows no path in logic.
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