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Old 09-12-2017, 11:46 AM
 
4,011 posts, read 2,528,300 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thoreau424 View Post
LOL It doesn't matter what an area looks like, or if an area meets someone's perfecting requirements. If it's a coast, it's a coast.

That's like saying brussels sprouts isn't a food, just because someone doesn't like it. That's nonsense, and follows no path in logic.
True. I agree 100%. It's a beach but it not a real beach. I'm sure someone from South Beach would laugh at the beach on the coast of Oregan even though it's still a beach
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Old 09-12-2017, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
1,090 posts, read 1,071,581 times
Reputation: 1941
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
It's nothing to do with "ruralness," since many areas on the "two main coast" have plentiful such areas. Swampiness and gaps between barrier islands aren't an issue either, since those features are also present through the East Coast (especially the portion corresponding to the Southern Atlantic states). The answer is simply lack of large enough media market (and/or popularity) on that coast.






Specifically about beaches, it's about the overall nature of the scene beyond just the popularity. The beaches of Alabama, Mississippi and Gulf Florida are well known destinations to the nation. But the scale of those beach scenes isn't to the point that entire clothing lines, brands, defined cultural atmospheres, etc are spawned from them. For instance, no clothing brand like LA's beach scene did with Hollister.
LOL, sounds like you watch too much Baywatch. Shall I suggest MTV's new "Siesta Key" to change your mind? Anyway, I meant to post and agree with you that rural, swampy areas are not exclusive to the Gulf Coast. But in the case of MS and AL they're also not exposed to the relentless thru traffic on I-95 that connects the NE and FL, the main areas that make up the coastal identity you speak of. It is a different feeling.

It sounds like you just want to argue that the entire Gulf Coast isn't big time enough to have it's own recognizable beach culture. I disagree, and I think it's getting away from the question the OP is asking, which is why some people aren't all that familiar with his area along the coast and don't mention the Gulf of Mexico enough.

My response has more to do with his specific region being more isolated in the conservative, Deep South and certain reporters who are lazy/and or running into culture unfamiliar with them. Again, I also think those same reporters would be equally surprised with many some of the rural locations along the rural Atlantic or Pacific coasts.

Again- I don't believe that this topic or the questions the OP asks apply to everywhere on the Gulf Coast. No reporter would show up in Tampa and act surprised that there are beaches nearby, or ask locals what they think about how people do things "on the coast". As others have mentioned, especially when it comes to the central and southern part of the peninsula, Florida is generally just regarded as Florida.
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Old 09-12-2017, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,386,291 times
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Yes, other wise WTF is it? Is the Gulf imaginary? It sure ain't East Coast.

A better question is for the GL which aren't a coast but kinda function like one anyway. "North Coast" or "Fresh Coast."
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Old 09-12-2017, 12:49 PM
 
2,006 posts, read 1,019,562 times
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It's amusing how people want to pick and choose what constitutes a coast. The "pick and choose", is usually driven (IMO), by a need to denigrate an area...due to various reasons. You name them, they all exist.
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Old 09-12-2017, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,386,291 times
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FYI "Coastal elitism" refers to elitist attitudes from people in large coastal cities mostly the east and west coast but it doesn't mean every where along the coast falls into that category. I would not describe a humble lobsterman from Maine to be a "Coastal elitist." Coastal elitists are people who think they are better simply because they live in an urban coastal city. Not everyone who lives in a coastal city will be like this and in some big coastal cities like Houston, this attitude isn't so common but it's a type of elitism that doesn't really exist in the inland portions of America. There's elitists here but they're elitists for different reasons. I honestly don't get coastal elitism. Most those people don't do anything besides LOOK at the ocean. You won't catch them on a boat unless it's a cruise or yacht. Hawaiians live on the coast and they are some of the least stuck up and most chill people I have ever met. That is, native Hawaiians at least.
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Old 09-12-2017, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,386,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fieldm View Post
True. I agree 100%. It's a beach but it not a real beach. I'm sure someone from South Beach would laugh at the beach on the coast of Oregan even though it's still a beach

Why would they laugh at it? The Oregon coast is far from tropical but it's extremely gorgeous with dramatic cliffs, seals and whales. I am from Miami and I wish I was able to see the coast when I was in Oregon last December. Coast does not equal beach, dude. And beach does not equal palm trees and bikinis. Btw I am going to a beach here in Minnesota in about 2 hours. I will let you know if I laugh.
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Old 09-12-2017, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,386,291 times
Reputation: 7710
Quote:
Originally Posted by bartonizer View Post
LOL, sounds like you watch too much Baywatch. Shall I suggest MTV's new "Siesta Key" to change your mind? Anyway, I meant to post and agree with you that rural, swampy areas are not exclusive to the Gulf Coast. But in the case of MS and AL they're also not exposed to the relentless thru traffic on I-95 that connects the NE and FL, the main areas that make up the coastal identity you speak of. It is a different feeling.

It sounds like you just want to argue that the entire Gulf Coast isn't big time enough to have it's own recognizable beach culture. I disagree, and I think it's getting away from the question the OP is asking, which is why some people aren't all that familiar with his area along the coast and don't mention the Gulf of Mexico enough.

My response has more to do with his specific region being more isolated in the conservative, Deep South and certain reporters who are lazy/and or running into culture unfamiliar with them. Again, I also think those same reporters would be equally surprised with many some of the rural locations along the rural Atlantic or Pacific coasts.

Again- I don't believe that this topic or the questions the OP asks apply to everywhere on the Gulf Coast. No reporter would show up in Tampa and act surprised that there are beaches nearby, or ask locals what they think about how people do things "on the coast". As others have mentioned, especially when it comes to the central and southern part of the peninsula, Florida is generally just regarded as Florida.
Anyone who thinks the Gulf Coast doesn't have a beach culture has never listened to Jimmy Buffett. Enough said.

Y'all wanna talk about "gulf coast beach branding" how about Margaritaville, Bubba Gump Shrimp, Salt Life. Spring Break on the FL panhandle, or in South Padre or Port Aransas. Massachusetts does a great job at marketing it's beach culture nationwide but reality is its beach culture doesn't compare to the Gulf. If you went by marketing you would swear Cape Cod rivals South Beach and Long Beach.
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Old 09-12-2017, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,177 posts, read 11,785,778 times
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The Gulf Coast is of course a "real" coast, but it's also true that in most common usage, if someone says "the coast" or talks about traveling from "coast to coast," they don't typically mean the Gulf Coast. I've never heard anyone refer to the "third coast" but maybe it would catch on. It does seem to be an extreme stretch to claim that title for Michigan, though!

And because this was irritating

Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
It's a very real thing, you probably don't notice it because you are from there.

I've known many people from the coasts, from college, transplants, and my own visiting.

Many times when I've met someone from Boston or NYC they confuse Idaho where I grew up with Ohio, Indiana or Iowa. When I point out they are different places I usually get poo pooed. "Yeah whats the difference, anyway." or "Yeah it's all flyover country." or some version of that. The fact that these areas are over a thousand miles apart or different regions of "flyover" country seems to be totally lost on them.

Its incredible how multicultural and international a place like NYC can be and yet most of them don't know a thing about most of their own country. One of my friend's cousins visiting from Manhattan gave me a hard time for not have eaten Ethiopian food before, yet merely moments before he though Idaho was flat and in the Midwest.

That encounter is pretty typical.

The fact that this discussion is even happening is a symptom of coastal elitism. Of course the gulf coast is a real coast, what a stupid discussion.
New York is also part of "their country" and I would venture to say that a lot of people in Idaho know next to nothing about New York. It's a big country and most people really only know about the specific areas they live in, a bit about the neighboring states perhaps, and then maybe what they've seen on TV or in movies about some of the rest of it.

On the other hand, as someone who spent the first 4+ decades of my life in New York and New England, I've never heard anyone use the term "flyover country" non-ironically.

What I do routinely hear is people saying that only those who don't live in large metropolitan areas or on the East or West coats are "real Americans" and sadly, they aren't being ironic when they say that either.

And somehow I doubt that the OP, whose profile describes himself as living in "the heart of Dixie," is a "coastal elite" despite the knee jerk attack.
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Old 09-12-2017, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,386,291 times
Reputation: 7710
Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
The Gulf Coast is of course a "real" coast, but it's also true that in most common usage, if someone says "the coast" or talks about traveling from "coast to coast," they don't typically mean the Gulf Coast. I've never heard anyone refer to the "third coast" but maybe it would catch on. It does seem to be an extreme stretch to claim that title for Michigan, though!

And because this was irritating



New York is also part of "their country" and I would venture to say that a lot of people in Idaho know next to nothing about New York. It's a big country and most people really only know about the specific areas they live in, a bit about the neighboring states perhaps, and then maybe what they've seen on TV or in movies about some of the rest of it.

On the other hand, as someone who spent the first 4+ decades of my life in New York and New England, I've never heard anyone use the term "flyover country" non-ironically.

What I do routinely hear is people saying that only those who don't live in large metropolitan areas or on the East or West coats are "real Americans" and sadly, they aren't being ironic when they say that either.

And somehow I doubt that the OP, whose profile describes himself as living in "the heart of Dixie," is a "coastal elite" despite the knee jerk attack.


Except a person from Idaho is more likely to know about New York than vice versa because of media exposure. Also I am sure there's a higher proportion of Idahoans who visited NY than the other way around. Shoot, I haven't been to either states but I still know more about NY than ID by a long shot. The thing is people in less populated areas are more likely to want to travel to a greater range of places than some urban dwellers. There's people who think their city is so great they never bother to leave and when they do they generally just fly to another city and barely leave their hotel except to do typical tourist stuff. These people are just as provincial as someone living in a trailer park in Oklahoma.
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Old 09-12-2017, 02:05 PM
 
Location: DMV Area
1,004 posts, read 602,222 times
Reputation: 1872
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Malone View Post
Really? HHmmmm Miami might be considered a " MegaCity".....dontcha think? Then of course there's Tampa , Orlando etc..............and that's just Florida.

What criteria is that term based on on? The economic? Ok then what about ports like Houston , Mobile , Biloxi . New Orleans ?

And NO " beach culture"? REALLY? Haven't been to Florida have you? Or Galveston , Padre , Matagorda etc.etc. Next y'all will be telling me that there is NO beach in Louisiana.

And NO " ocean culture"?...............Ok , sure thing..................that's why actual Blue Water Sailboats and Motor Cruisers are actually more prevalent as regards sales and cheaper than anywhere else in the entire country?
Miami is on the Atlantic, not the Gulf.
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