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Old 09-12-2017, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
21,318 posts, read 21,872,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Yes, other wise WTF is it? Is the Gulf imaginary? It sure ain't East Coast.

A better question is for the GL which aren't a coast but kinda function like one anyway. "North Coast" or "Fresh Coast."

lots of people are talking about the Great Lakes as the Third Coast, many people, it's what I'm hearing anyways
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Old 09-12-2017, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,631 posts, read 8,318,123 times
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It is true that in the past you could have suggested that the Gulf Coast is underdeveloped with regard to major population centers. As someone else pointed it out up thread that the Gulf Coast unlike the Atlantic or Pacific Coasts still lacks that megacity to anchor it. The Atlantic and Pacific have had decades of a lead to brand their culture around their major population centers, since they've been more populous for so long and in the case of the Pacific, it has been the growth child of the country for about a century now. It quickly went from underdeveloped with regard to population centers to very well developed in less than a century's time. I think in that regard the Gulf Coast has some decades ahead of it before it does that but that isn't really important either way. When you look at every other aspect of a coastal community, there are cities and places along the Gulf Coast that have everything else you could want.

Though that will change in the next 25-30 years when Houston passes the megacity threshold and in addition to Houston, the Tampa Bay Area, will also be quite large and formidable itself. It already is, as an MSA of over 3 million and the "Tampa Bay Area" when including nearby Sarasota and Lakeland, both of which will be absorbed into Tampa Bay Area in a newly created CSA within the next 10 years has a population that is just shy of 5 million right now (4.8 million, also including Homosassa Springs). The Rio Grande Valley area of Texas is a fast growing metropolis with 1.35 million people, it starts at the coast with South Padre and then goes inland into McAllen, with those two counties Cameron and Hidalgo being their core (with two other counties as well). There is also the Naples/Fort Myers CSA, which this decade surpassed 1 million people and already tops 1.1 million people. It is one of the fastest growing places in all of America, the second fastest after Austin among PCSAs above 1 million people. It will only continue to become even larger and it is one of the most expensive places in all of Florida, with prime beachfront properties. Then there is New Orleans, a city quite different from all others in its country. New Orleans will always be New Orleans.

That's not as long of a list of major population centers as the Atlantic or the Pacific, but it is formidable and it came together quickly in the last 50-70 years. If you go back to 1950, the Gulf Coast truly was underdeveloped back then with the only major cities being New Orleans and a very young toddler aged Houston.

I fully expect population growth to continue in the decades to come. More major population centers will be added to the 1 million PCSA + list and the ones currently there will all become much larger and much more formidable than they are now.

Look at #51 on this list, with + 15.65% growth, popularity is not an issue for major population centers along the Gulf Coast.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combined_statistical_area

I don't know this to be fact but I wouldn't be surprised if by mid-century that some of Baton Rouge, Corpus Christi, Mobile, Pensacola, Tallahassee end up with 1 million or more people as a PCSA (metropolis). Baton Rouge is a given, it's not too far off from it now, should get there soon enough. The region does need a coastal spine though, that will serve a safe guard for it against storm surge, other than that, seems ripe for lift off.
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Old 09-12-2017, 02:21 PM
 
Location: DMV Area
1,004 posts, read 600,751 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Facts Kill Rhetoric View Post
It is true that in the past you could have suggested that the Gulf Coast is underdeveloped with regard to major population centers. As someone else pointed it out up thread that the Gulf Coast unlike the Atlantic or Pacific Coasts still lacks that megacity to anchor it. The Atlantic and Pacific have had decades of a lead to brand their culture around their major population centers, since they've been more populous for so long. I think in that regard the Gulf Coast has some decades ahead of it before it does that but that isn't really important either way. When you look at every other aspect of a coastal community, there are cities and places along the Gulf Coast that have everything else you could want.

Though that will change in the next 25-30 years when Houston passes the megacity threshold and in addition to Houston, the Tampa Bay Area, will also be quite large and formidable itself. It already is, as an MSA of over 3 million and the "Tampa Bay Area" when including nearby Sarasota and Lakeland, both of which will be absorbed into Tampa Bay Area in a newly created CSA within the next 10 years has a population that is just shy of 5 million right now (4.8 million, also including Homosassa Springs). The Rio Grande Valley area of Texas is a fast growing metropolis with 1.35 million people, it starts at the coast with South Padre and then goes inland into McAllen. There is also the Naples/Fort Myers CSA, which this decade surpassed 1 million people and already tops 1.1 million people. It is one of the fastest growing places in all of America, it will only continue to become even larger and it is one of the most expensive places in all of Florida, with prime beachfront properties. Then there is New Orleans, a city quite different from all others in its country. New Orleans will always be New Orleans.

That's not as long of a list of major population centers as the Atlantic or the Pacific, but it is formidable and it came together quickly in the last 50-70 years. If you go back to 1950, the Gulf Coast truly was underdeveloped back then with the only major cities being New Orleans and a very young toddler aged Houston.

I fully expect population growth to continue in the decades to come. More major population centers will be added to the 1 million PCSA + list and the ones currently there will all become much larger and much more formidable than they are now.

Look at #51 on this list, with + 15.65% growth, popularity is not an issue for major population centers along the Gulf Coast.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combined_statistical_area

I don't know this to be fact but I wouldn't be surprised if by mid-century that some of Baton Rouge, Corpus Christi, Mobile, Pensacola, Tallahassee end up with 1 million or more people as a PCSA (metropolis). Baton Rouge is a given, it's not too far off from it now, should get there soon enough. The region does need a coastal spine though, that will serve a safe guard for it against storm surge, other than that, seems ripe for lift off.

Good post. Before the advent of Central AC, the Gulf Coast was pretty much a no-mans land in comparison to more populated areas on the East and West Coasts. Also, much of the development there is very recent compared to the more established cities on the more well-known coasts. Houston was a city of only 600,000 people as recently as 1950. In comparison LA already had almost 2 Million people by that period.

Honestly, the West Coast wasn't even taken seriously as a region by coastal elites in the Northeast until the late 20th century. These things take time.
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Old 09-12-2017, 03:13 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,277,280 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bartonizer View Post
LOL, sounds like you watch too much Baywatch. Shall I suggest MTV's new "Siesta Key" to change your mind? Anyway, I meant to post and agree with you that rural, swampy areas are not exclusive to the Gulf Coast. But in the case of MS and AL they're also not exposed to the relentless thru traffic on I-95 that connects the NE and FL, the main areas that make up the coastal identity you speak of. It is a different feeling.

It sounds like you just want to argue that the entire Gulf Coast isn't big time enough to have it's own recognizable beach culture. I disagree, and I think it's getting away from the question the OP is asking, which is why some people aren't all that familiar with his area along the coast and don't mention the Gulf of Mexico enough.

My response has more to do with his specific region being more isolated in the conservative, Deep South and certain reporters who are lazy/and or running into culture unfamiliar with them. Again, I also think those same reporters would be equally surprised with many some of the rural locations along the rural Atlantic or Pacific coasts.
The Gulf is gaining nation-wide traction, yes, but still has ways to go to reach the clout put forth by East/West coast beach centers. Got to start seeing much more TV series, clothing lines, subcultures, etc spawned from the Gulf and its cities first. Not sure what people aren't getting about this.

The points about the Gulf "not having big time beach culture" contributes heavily to the circumstances regarding the OP's point (and so does the "Deep South" conservatism you mention): that the Gulf Coast is often excluded when people talk about the "coasts." Thus, it doesn't get away from the OP's question at all.
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Old 09-12-2017, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Gulf Coast
1,256 posts, read 541,298 times
Reputation: 1981
Quote:
Originally Posted by ParaguaneroSwag View Post
No. I don't consider the Gulf Coast an actual coast. I consider it a mountain region. I mean sure. There's water. But if you use your imagination, you will see a mountain range that resembles the Rocky Mountains.
Hey, I like that! Next time a hurricane floods us out, we'll just evacuate to the mountains down the road. Then come winter it's South Mississippi Ski Country! But let's be honest ... our mountains can't really compete with the Appalachians and Rockies, politically. I mean, how can they even exist when aren't any shows about them? Gee, imaginary mountains sure do make me sad.

Last edited by SouthernProper; 09-12-2017 at 04:44 PM..
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Old 09-12-2017, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Mars City
5,091 posts, read 2,136,536 times
Reputation: 7505
The Gulf Coast is a just a mirage. It's really solid land. So OP, go ahead and drive on it freely.
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Old 09-12-2017, 08:46 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,111 posts, read 1,303,876 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
It's a very real thing, you probably don't notice it because you are from there.

I've known many people from the coasts, from college, transplants, and my own visiting.

Many times when I've met someone from Boston or NYC they confuse Idaho where I grew up with Ohio, Indiana or Iowa. When I point out they are different places I usually get poo pooed. "Yeah whats the difference, anyway." or "Yeah it's all flyover country." or some version of that. The fact that these areas are over a thousand miles apart or different regions of "flyover" country seems to be totally lost on them.

Its incredible how multicultural and international a place like NYC can be and yet most of them don't know a thing about most of their own country. One of my friend's cousins visiting from Manhattan gave me a hard time for not have eaten Ethiopian food before, yet merely moments before he though Idaho was flat and in the Midwest.

That encounter is pretty typical.
The Idaho/Iowa thing is tricky though. It's not necessarily that they're mixing up the actual places, just the names. I think I've been guilty of similar mixups before when I was younger. I see what you're saying, and I think you're onto something about NYers in general. I personally have been all over The US and I think I know it pretty well, but I've noticed that a lot of NYers seem to know nothing about the rest of the US (except Florida), but know a lot about other countries and cities around the world.

But OTOH, people from other parts of the US can be very uninformed about NYC too. You don't have to look any further than CD itself to see some examples.
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Old 09-13-2017, 06:41 AM
 
2,013 posts, read 1,011,832 times
Reputation: 2662
It's really kind of funny, though, the little geographical knowledge some people on the coast have. They think it's okay, because they're dismissive, but really, it just makes them look like they failed geography. Maybe a 4th grader knows more about US geography, than some adults?
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Old 09-13-2017, 08:29 AM
 
2,511 posts, read 2,265,374 times
Reputation: 1820
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post
It's really kind of funny, though, the little geographical knowledge some people on the coast have. They think it's okay, because they're dismissive, but really, it just makes them look like they failed geography. Maybe a 4th grader knows more about US geography, than some adults?
I would guess that just as many if not more people away from the coasts know as much about US geography... broad strokes? I love it when people in Middle America generalize the coasts because of "coastal elitism" or what not yet paint the coasts as all the same.
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Old 09-13-2017, 08:30 AM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,804 posts, read 1,295,354 times
Reputation: 3204
Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
The Idaho/Iowa thing is tricky though. It's not necessarily that they're mixing up the actual places, just the names. I think I've been guilty of similar mixups before when I was younger. I see what you're saying, and I think you're onto something about NYers in general. I personally have been all over The US and I think I know it pretty well, but I've noticed that a lot of NYers seem to know nothing about the rest of the US (except Florida), but know a lot about other countries and cities around the world.

But OTOH, people from other parts of the US can be very uninformed about NYC too. You don't have to look any further than CD itself to see some examples.
Yeah I don't mean to to categorize everyone from the city one way, I've known well traveled and interested New Yorkers before for sure.

Part of it probably has to do with a national lack of proficiency in geography. It blows my mind that lots of people couldn't fill in a blank map of the US with state names.

Of course many people may have misinformed views about NYC but everyone still knows something about NYC where it is, what it looks like etc because it is the most important major city and is prominently featured in TV and movies.

.
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