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Old 09-15-2017, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Monument,CO
352 posts, read 291,210 times
Reputation: 554

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Howest2008 View Post
When African-Americans from the farm see New York City , Los Angeles California , San Francisco California and Chicago Illinois... "you just can't keep them down on the farm" anymore....
San Francisco? Not a chance. What's the African American population of SF?
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Old 09-15-2017, 12:40 PM
 
29,891 posts, read 27,333,728 times
Reputation: 18435
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
It is rural American culture as lived and handed down generationally by African-Americans in rural areas. I don't think there is a suggestion that it is a radical subculture apart from the rest of rural America. If anything rural African-Americans are more culturally like their white neighbors than urban blacks and whites, in my experience.

To the question posed in the OP, I do think it is in decline at the same rate as the rural American culture as a whole. That is, its decline is not specific to the greater African-American community. I grew up in the NYC metro area and most of the AAs I knew were the first or second generation living in the city, their parents or grandparents having moved up from Virginia, North Carolina, or Georgia in the 1950s and 60s. It is no surprise to me that this phenomenon is not only continuing, but that the urban culture (which is what we really call 'pop culture') is ebbing back from the cities into rural areas, thus culturally "urbanizing" small towns (populated by any and all races).

That said, I have just seen nine straight days of rodeo with white, black, Hispanic, and Native American participants and enthusiastic fans so I can tell you it is not dead yet.
None from SC? That's interesting...tons of Black folks with SC roots can be found in NYC.
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Old 09-15-2017, 01:56 PM
 
100 posts, read 62,528 times
Reputation: 59
I only used the term African American because I ( thought ) it's considered to be less controversial than black , but apparently I was wrong . At any rate I'd prefer that this thread went back on topic , since I'm sure that there are plenty of other threads devoted to semantic discussions .

Anyways to get back on point , I'm writing as a fellow who hasn't really experienced rural Black American culture firsthand . I grew up in a place ( North New Jersey ) in which it was completely absent and I still haven't seen much of it since moving to the Eastern part of WV .

The interesting thing is that the part of WV I live in has an above average number of Black Americans . A lot of them are local too as opposed to being DC or Baltimore transplants . However I don't see much rural black culture in my area , in spite of there being a fairly large rural black population .

Now I realize that the term " rural black culture " is a bit subjective and also that I might have a hazy understanding of it , yet there are definitely certain cultural practices that originate from Black Americans living in rural areas , such as blues music and the Black American church tradition .

I've also seen a documentary ( can't remember the name ) which featured Black Americans from a rural part of the Deep South , who lived a very " country " lifestyle according to American standards . The thing is in my area you don't see many ( if any ) Black Americans having a typical rural lifestyle .

My question is does this phenomenon crop up all over the USA ? Or is it just an Eastern WV thing ?

P.S. I realize that it's debatable whether or not the Eastern Panhandle is rural , but for the sake of the thread I'm going to refer to it as rural .

Last edited by Gene Chode; 09-15-2017 at 02:12 PM..
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Old 09-15-2017, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, California
459 posts, read 340,516 times
Reputation: 411
Rural areas, whether it's the Black Belt of Alabama or the white population of Northern Georgia are all dying. So, to answer that question.....yes. Generally, they flock to the higher populated cities within their states.
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Old 09-15-2017, 02:21 PM
 
56,538 posts, read 80,824,285 times
Reputation: 12490
Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
I'm sure that's true. In fact, they are still leaving.

But my comments were specifically concerning the poverty/dependent group. That group is separate from the group that is simply poor. Being dependent on the government forces people to stay where they are - or at least that's the way they feel.
if they are dependent, why would they stay in MS, where the "benefits" aren't as good? Many people aren't necessarily "dependent" for a long time either. So, it is tough to say...
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Old 09-15-2017, 02:24 PM
 
56,538 posts, read 80,824,285 times
Reputation: 12490
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
None from SC? That's interesting...tons of Black folks with SC roots can be found in NYC.
I was thinking the same thing and I'm sure some went to the city he is referring to(M.V.).
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Old 09-15-2017, 02:25 PM
 
56,538 posts, read 80,824,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unbeliever View Post
San Francisco? Not a chance. What's the African American population of SF?
About 6%, which is down form its peak percentage of about 14%.
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Old 09-15-2017, 09:11 PM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
13,645 posts, read 8,559,902 times
Reputation: 19857
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
if they are dependent, why would they stay in MS, where the "benefits" aren't as good? Many people aren't necessarily "dependent" for a long time either. So, it is tough to say...
They don't have a way to leave.

If they have a car, it doesn't run well. They don't know anyone in any other place other than Mississippi.
And most of all, they receive their money from the state. Oftentimes that dependency goes back generations.

You may have to think about it for a while to get the picture. Adults with almost no work experience, certainly no training, who struggle to even make themselves understood outside their own area.
It's pretty bad.
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Old 09-15-2017, 09:16 PM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
13,645 posts, read 8,559,902 times
Reputation: 19857
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene Chode View Post
I only used the term African American because I ( thought ) it's considered to be less controversial than black , but apparently I was wrong..........
I speak to a lot of Black people, so I can tell you that here in Mississippi White and Black people refer to themselves as "White" or "Black". I have never heard the term "African American" used in conversation. I see it in the news, hear it on TV and in court, but never in conversation.

My own opinion is, "African American" is a term used by White people who don't actually know any Black folks.
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Old 09-16-2017, 12:08 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,720,777 times
Reputation: 30796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
None from SC? That's interesting...tons of Black folks with SC roots can be found in NYC.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I was thinking the same thing and I'm sure some went to the city he is referring to(M.V.).
I didn't mean to omit SC. Just an oversight.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
I speak to a lot of Black people, so I can tell you that here in Mississippi White and Black people refer to themselves as "White" or "Black". I have never heard the term "African American" used in conversation. I see it in the news, hear it on TV and in court, but never in conversation.

My own opinion is, "African American" is a term used by White people who don't actually know any Black folks.
In my opinion, 'African-American' is a term useful for anyone of any race who wants to make a distinction between black people whose ancestors were brought to America during the slave trade and who made an immense contribution to the culture and community of this country over a period of centuries, both in servitude and freedom, as opposed to black people who came here by plane from African countries in recent decades as regular immigrants whose experience is much more like immigrants from Europe or Latin America.

But yes, 'black' is the preferred everyday term. On the other hand I know some Africans and Caribbeans who prefer to be called "Nigerian" or "Bajan". I just call people what they want.
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