U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-18-2017, 07:19 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,170,205 times
Reputation: 4350

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Because it's a Western-centric term. Black/White don't fall into the same category.
I understand. Oriental has been placed in the same category as Negro. But it's funny how those who claim the term African American is inappropriate for our ethnicity never seem to make the same argument for Asian American.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-18-2017, 11:13 AM
 
3,297 posts, read 1,880,464 times
Reputation: 2448
Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post
You mean young black kids don't grow up wanting to be the next Muddy Waters anymore?

Or Lightnin' Hopkins, Robert Johnson, John Lee Hooker, "Mississippi" John Hurt, Elmore James, Leadbelly, Big Bill Broonzy, Ma Rainey, Bessie Smith and all the other great "Delta Blues" musicians of that era. That was the foundation of all the great rock bands of the 60's and 70's.

Then there's Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Jimi Hendrix, Stevie Wonder, Bill Withers, and Robert Cray.

How they evolved from that to "rap" is beyond me?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-18-2017, 11:59 AM
 
1,593 posts, read 837,009 times
Reputation: 1220
Probably every ethnic culture dies out once its been here long enough.

Were I'm from (Boston) Southie isn't Irish and the Northend and East Boston aren't Italian. South Boston and the Northend are just kids post college and East Boston is more Latino than anything else.

Last edited by The_General; 09-18-2017 at 12:26 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-18-2017, 12:20 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,534 posts, read 17,773,692 times
Reputation: 30886
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ex New Yorker View Post
Or Lightnin' Hopkins, Robert Johnson, John Lee Hooker, "Mississippi" John Hurt, Elmore James, Leadbelly, Big Bill Broonzy, Ma Rainey, Bessie Smith and all the other great "Delta Blues" musicians of that era. That was the foundation of all the great rock bands of the 60's and 70's.

Then there's Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Jimi Hendrix, Stevie Wonder, Bill Withers, and Robert Cray.

How they evolved from that to "rap" is beyond me?
Rap didn't evolve from African-American music forms like jazz, blues, rhythm & Blues, etc. Rap has its origins in relatively recent dance party DJing from Jamaica.

At these dance parties, the DJ would make introductions and toasts to prominent party goers.

Those toasts would be given during instrumental sections in the music and evolved into a rhyming form. This origin in toasting is why many rap songs, especially early on in the 80s, involved so much name dropping and introducing the names of rappers and their friends. "My name is <...> and I'm here to say..."

To stay germane to the topic, I just worked my local State Fair and saw a hefty handful of country music concerts. You might be surprised how many black musicians and fans there were, even here in New Mexico which isn't exactly the blackest state in the union.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-18-2017, 12:57 PM
 
3,297 posts, read 1,880,464 times
Reputation: 2448
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Rap didn't evolve from African-American music forms like jazz, blues, rhythm & Blues, etc. Rap has its origins in relatively recent dance party DJing from Jamaica.

At these dance parties, the DJ would make introductions and toasts to prominent party goers.

Those toasts would be given during instrumental sections in the music and evolved into a rhyming form. This origin in toasting is why many rap songs, especially early on in the 80s, involved so much name dropping and introducing the names of rappers and their friends. "My name is <...> and I'm here to say..."

To stay germane to the topic, I just worked my local State Fair and saw a hefty handful of country music concerts. You might be surprised how many black musicians and fans there were, even here in New Mexico which isn't exactly the blackest state in the union.
When we were living in the New York metro area "rap" was all we heard blaring out the windows of vehicles that raced through our neighborhood and out on the highway. It would rattle the windows in our house. At least to me it all sounded the same. I don't even consider it to be music. Just rhythmic shouting to a loud thunderous beat. It wasn't just blacks that listened to it. In fact is was more white wanna' be gangsta's thinking they were a badass. With the attitude that: Yeah, I'm gonna' blast that noise, what are you gonna' do about it?

I thank God that we now live in your neighboring state to the west. After 7 years we've yet to hear any of it. I guess it's a different culture out here? A culture that we're glad to be living amongst.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-18-2017, 04:12 PM
 
Location: SW Virginia
50 posts, read 20,206 times
Reputation: 52
Is rural African American culture dying out?



I think it will never die out. Sure, many of us black millennials want to get away from the poverty, low paying jobs, terrible schools, and boring lifestyle in rural/small town areas but at the same time we have roots here from generation after generation so it's going to be hard for some of us to leave. It will never die out because nearby big cities metropolitan areas are getting too crowded and urban sections of some big cities are currently under gentrification meaning economic developers tear down and kicking out people from inner city black neighborhoods so they could build condos, retail stores, restaurants, and etc. When that happen African Americans relocate either the suburbs or return back to the rural areas to be close to their families.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-18-2017, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Juneau
601 posts, read 713,386 times
Reputation: 2272
I hope not. Some of the finest people I knew were African American rural folk when I was growing up.

I think the past 20 years have been stale, sterile and culturally void for all of us. I see a "back to our roots" revival for all of us, black, white or other. This pretentiousness that has invaded the soul needs to be purged
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top