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Old 09-23-2017, 09:53 AM
 
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I'll have to keep the dry winters in mind, but I do like Colorado.


I went around looking at the humidity of multiple cities in Vermont and the majority of them were in the upper eighties and higher. I think I only found two cities that were low and I have been keeping an eye on them. I will, however, admit that I've struggled finding any sites that will tell me what the humidity is year round and I'm not sure if the sites that do come up are accurate. I normally like to compare multiple sites, but I'm lucky if I get one. I do really like Vermont and it is still on my list.
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Old 09-23-2017, 03:37 PM
 
Location: NC
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Just want to remind everyone that the dew point is much more important than the humidity, in terms of comfort level. I wish more experts would report the dew point range. Humidity will be high when it is raining (lol) and early in the morning when temps are low and there is moisture on the grass, but you won't feel miserable. However if the dewpoint is a steady 75 all day most people will be uncomfortable.
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Old 09-23-2017, 08:41 PM
 
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Originally Posted by luv4horses View Post
Just want to remind everyone that the dew point is much more important than the humidity, in terms of comfort level. I wish more experts would report the dew point range. Humidity will be high when it is raining (lol) and early in the morning when temps are low and there is moisture on the grass, but you won't feel miserable. However if the dewpoint is a steady 75 all day most people will be uncomfortable.

I agree, that should be reported. I've seen it, but I've never really known what it meant or what it affected. It's always about the humidity which, admittedly, I don't understand that very well either.
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Old 09-24-2017, 12:06 PM
 
Location: SF, CA
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Default if you don't mind rain and cloudiness

Humboldt County CA might be the place for you... along the coast (Eureka, Arcata) the temperature is in the 60s most of the time. Nature? Oh yes: redwood forests, elk, etc. etc.

Or the Olympic Peninsula in WA (Pt Angeles, Sequim, Pt Townsend). Mild temperatures, lots of rain, magnificent forests and coastline, lots of wildlife.

But finding work in either of those places might be a challenge!
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Old 09-25-2017, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
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Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Vermont is humid? I would investigate a bit further if it appeals to you otherwise. Unless you're a truly delicate flower, the vast majority would not find Vermont anywhere near humid.
Vermont is indeed humid. The difference here, though, is that its a cold humid, which makes it more tolerable.
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Old 09-25-2017, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Mars City
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Originally Posted by AnimalFreak View Post
Colorado is a state I'm interested in and have done some research on. My only question would be if it gets too dry in the winter.
It's dry all year round. Not sure what "too dry is", but it doesn't get much drier than there.

A bigger issue is if you are okay with lots of snow, and cold frigid days. Colorado Springs has plenty of that. There's no way to say the deep months of winter (especially Dec.-March) are comfortable, unless you love cold.

The good aspect of humidity is that it helps constrain wide temperature variations. The more humidity, the less the swing of temps. Back to COS again, due to the severe dryness, it can range from subzero teens to around 100 degrees.

As far as beauty and Vermont, nothing in Colorado can compare to that state. The moisture leads to the wooded lushness. Trees and dense stands thrive with moisture. Trees often look scrawny in much of Colorado; water-starved.
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Old 09-25-2017, 03:50 PM
 
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Originally Posted by BIG CATS View Post
Vermont is indeed humid. The difference here, though, is that its a cold humid, which makes it more tolerable.
If I could, I'd like to plan a trip there to see if it's tolerable to me, but I'm not sure if Vermont is going to be an option anyway since everything I've read says the cost of living it's really high.
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Old 09-25-2017, 04:14 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Thoreau424 View Post
It's dry all year round. Not sure what "too dry is", but it doesn't get much drier than there.

A bigger issue is if you are okay with lots of snow, and cold frigid days. Colorado Springs has plenty of that. There's no way to say the deep months of winter (especially Dec.-March) are comfortable, unless you love cold.

The good aspect of humidity is that it helps constrain wide temperature variations. The more humidity, the less the swing of temps. Back to COS again, due to the severe dryness, it can range from subzero teens to around 100 degrees.

As far as beauty and Vermont, nothing in Colorado can compare to that state. The moisture leads to the wooded lushness. Trees and dense stands thrive with moisture. Trees often look scrawny in much of Colorado; water-starved.

Really? I thought I read that Colorado Springs didn't have as much snow and that it didn't last long when it did snow. I don't remember where this information came from now though. And, while I don't prefer freezing temperatures, I'll take the cold over the heat. At least I don't faint in the cold. My biggest concern would be getting snowed in. It might not be a huge deal at first, but eventually I want to open my own animal shelter and I can't afford to not go. Of course, I'm hoping to have it in walking distance so it might not be as big of a deal.
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Old 09-25-2017, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnimalFreak View Post
Really? I thought I read that Colorado Springs didn't have as much snow and that it didn't last long when it did snow. I don't remember where this information came from now though. And, while I don't prefer freezing temperatures, I'll take the cold over the heat. At least I don't faint in the cold. My biggest concern would be getting snowed in. It might not be a huge deal at first, but eventually I want to open my own animal shelter and I can't afford to not go. Of course, I'm hoping to have it in walking distance so it might not be as big of a deal.
Colorado Springs averages about 38" of snow per year. Denver is closer to 54". The snow tends to be heavier to the north and west, and lighter the further south you go along I-25. Because it's so sunny and dry the snow does not stick around for days/weeks on end like it does in the Upper Midwest.

Temps do vary wildly from day-to-day, but you really shouldn't be worried about the extremes. Below-zero temps occur a handful of times each winter, but triple digit heat is extremely rare. Colorado Springs all-time high is 101, and the city's only had four days at or above 100 since 2010 (3 in 2012, 1 in 2016).

As far as the forest goes, Colorado has plenty of it, but it's concentrated above 7000', it's heavily evergreen, and it's not as dense as the old growth forests back east.
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Old 09-25-2017, 06:00 PM
 
Location: North America
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Look into northern California communities. There are no major cities, maybe Sacramento is nearest. Land up there is greener than southern California. You have the options to stay near the Sierra Nevadas or closer to the coast and the Redwood forests/ocean. or the middle. Only a few hours drive to SF.
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