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Old 04-29-2019, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Lebanon, OH
5,896 posts, read 6,325,008 times
Reputation: 12577
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
A lot of people may not know that Duluth even had an NFL team at one time: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duluth_Kelleys/Eskimos
Portsmouth Ohio had an NFL team called the Spartans that became the Detroit Lions in 1934.
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Old 04-29-2019, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Lil Rhodey
680 posts, read 464,289 times
Reputation: 938
I think Providence was on it's way to becoming bigger, but when manufacturing left, it pretty much came to a stop
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Old 04-30-2019, 07:35 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
354 posts, read 108,358 times
Reputation: 335
Jacksonville seems to have the potential to be bigger, not so much in population but in relevance like it's peer Flordia cities like Tampa, Orlando and Miami had it focused more on tourism and appealing to the retired crowd. It's still surprisingly the largest city in Flordia but often overlooked by many out-of-state residents. Atlantic Beach does get a good reputation by the people who live and visit there and being at the crossroads of two of America's longest interstates i-95 and i-10 shows that it could be serious contender for being a Major city in the eyes of the rest of America. If Jacksonville had more major sports teams, skyscrapers, less crime and a more tourist attarticions it could attract more people, but poetnially lose it's local charm which many Flordia cities had to go through in the past 50-60 years hence why many people don't perceive Flordia as southern like it"s neighboring states.
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Old 05-01-2019, 09:08 AM
 
Location: San Francisco/East Bay and Los Angeles, formerly DC and Boston
2,142 posts, read 3,431,985 times
Reputation: 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuit_head View Post
Richmond has an excellent location due to its proximity to the NE Corridor and the Piedmont Atlantic megaregions, plus its between the Ocean and the Mountains. It should be a much more major city than it became, but it seems like it has a lot of insular Powers That Be that kept it from reaching its potential. .
In spite of a great Fall Line location, Richmond's flour milling industry never caught up to the size of Fall Line peers to its north, Philly and Baltimore. The reason is that instead of being surrounded by farmers growing wheat, Richmond was surrounded by tobacco planters, and it kicked back and relied on that cash crop.
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Old 05-01-2019, 11:18 AM
 
Location: DMV Area
1,004 posts, read 602,222 times
Reputation: 1872
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheseGoTo11 View Post
In spite of a great Fall Line location, Richmond's flour milling industry never caught up to the size of Fall Line peers to its north, Philly and Baltimore. The reason is that instead of being surrounded by farmers growing wheat, Richmond was surrounded by tobacco planters, and it kicked back and relied on that cash crop.
Makes total sense
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Old 05-01-2019, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Shelby County ,Tn
781 posts, read 711,832 times
Reputation: 639
Cincinnati, Oh & Galveston, Tx
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Old 05-01-2019, 06:22 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,978 posts, read 3,460,039 times
Reputation: 2450
Hampton Roads/ Va Beach/ Tidewater area.

Look at it on a map, should be at least a metro of 3/4 million with that type of location.
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Old 05-01-2019, 08:38 PM
 
145 posts, read 104,216 times
Reputation: 468
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheseGoTo11 View Post
In spite of a great Fall Line location, Richmond's flour milling industry never caught up to the size of Fall Line peers to its north, Philly and Baltimore. The reason is that instead of being surrounded by farmers growing wheat, Richmond was surrounded by tobacco planters, and it kicked back and relied on that cash crop.
At the time of the Civil War, Richmond was actually the second largest flour milling center in the United States--slightly behind Baltimore. The enormous Gallego Flour Mills (900 barrels/day) and the Haxall Mills (700 barrels/day) were the largest flour mills in the country and perhaps in the world. Wheat was shipped into Richmond from distant parts of Virginia via railroads and the James River/Kanawha Canal.

Prior to 1860, Richmond was the industrial center of the South. In addition to flour, it was the worlds largest manufacturer of tobacco and the country's leading coffee port. The Tredegar Iron Works were the largest in the South and provided one-half of the Confederacy's artillery, plus engines, locomotives, and iron plating for the C.S.S Virginia (Merrimac). Also, the Crenshaw Woolen Mills were the prime supplier of material for soldier's uniforms.

Richmond's industrial importance was a prime reason the Confederate capital was moved to the city from Montgomery, Alabama in May of 1861.
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Old 05-02-2019, 07:24 AM
 
Location: DMV Area
1,004 posts, read 602,222 times
Reputation: 1872
Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
Hampton Roads/ Va Beach/ Tidewater area.

Look at it on a map, should be at least a metro of 3/4 million with that type of location.
Yeah, I always thought that Hampton Roads should be way bigger and be a southeastern bookend to Boston to the Northeast, but it seems like the area depends on the military for its economy, nothing wrong with that, but the area is very transient and there's no sense of place there. Norfolk should have more historical cachet, but it seems as if a lot of areas were torn down for urban renewal projects and they didn't really hold on to its bones the way Richmond has. Virginia Beach is a huge suburb more or less and seems to be very anti-urban (i.e., the light rail they voted down), when it "should" be the eastern equivalent to San Jose (small town turned into boomtown), but there was never the infrastructure or capital to invest in a tech economy. Also being away from the I-95 corridor sort of hindered its growth - Hampton Roads is essentially a cul-de-sac, so even though it's great for water transportation, it's a place that people go to, and not through, therefore there isn't much in terms of logistics there compared to other coastal metros.
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Old 05-02-2019, 09:26 AM
 
Location: San Francisco/East Bay and Los Angeles, formerly DC and Boston
2,142 posts, read 3,431,985 times
Reputation: 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by VTinPhilly View Post
At the time of the Civil War, Richmond was actually the second largest flour milling center in the United States--slightly behind Baltimore.
In 1860, Baltimore was exporting 3x the flour Richmond was.
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