U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 09-25-2017, 09:04 PM
 
5 posts, read 7,912 times
Reputation: 12

Advertisements

Tulsa, ok
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-26-2017, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Northeast states
10,675 posts, read 8,193,365 times
Reputation: 2898
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjv007 View Post
Philly could have become a much greater city both in actuality and reputation without New York hovering overhead. It's difficult to stand out with the world's greatest city less than 50 miles away.
90 miles*
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2017, 08:44 AM
 
905 posts, read 913,125 times
Reputation: 809
Philadelphia
DC
Newark NJ
Richmond VA
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2017, 09:23 AM
 
499 posts, read 540,544 times
Reputation: 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by saybanana View Post
Washington D.C. What would it look like if it were a diamond?
Lots of slaves because of Arlington, va and Alexandria, va?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2017, 10:32 AM
 
Location: crafton pa
979 posts, read 356,721 times
Reputation: 1194
There's a fairly clear historical reason why some cities were surpassed by others. Prior to the mid 19th century, an absolute requirement for an area to develop into a major city was water transportation. There simply was no effective way to transport freight or people without using water of some kind. This primarily meant that the major cities developed on coasts. This would include cities such as Savannah and Charleston in the South, as well as Philly, Boston, New York and Baltimore in the North and Mid-Atlantic areas. By the mid 18th century, two new economic factors came into play, industrialization and the development of railroads. These were not independent developments -- industry needed more efficient transportation of resources and finished goods to flourish; railroads needed equipment produced by industry as well as industrial firms as a customer base to ensure profitability for their very large initial investment in building the railroads. The combination of these two factors then led to the development of inland cities, with Atlanta being a prime example. To be a major city now meant development of an industrial base, rather than geographic location along a coast or river. Those coastal cities that developed an industrial base, such as Philly, NYC and Boston remained major cities. Those such as Charleston and Savannah that continued to serve primarily as ports for the agricultural production of the surrounding countryside were eventually surpassed.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2017, 10:40 AM
 
311 posts, read 218,568 times
Reputation: 342
Quote:
Originally Posted by BPt111 View Post
90 miles*
It's actually only 45 miles from NE Philly to Staten Island and even CC Philly to Manhattan is 80 miles give or take. NYC's circle of influence is obviously much larger than your average city's as well.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2017, 12:21 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,804,722 times
Reputation: 11136
Wilmington, NC should have been a much larger port city. As the largest city on the long coast of the country's 9th most populated state and at the mouth a major river, it would seem to me that its development should have been more significant. Who knows? Maybe one day it will live up to its potential. It has so much natural resource and proximity to offer with beautiful barrier islands, a historic downtown and easy access via I-40 to Raleigh/Durham and points north and south.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2017, 01:50 PM
 
29,944 posts, read 27,375,616 times
Reputation: 18517
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
Wilmington, NC should have been a much larger port city. As the largest city on the long coast of the country's 9th most populated state and at the mouth a major river, it would seem to me that its development should have been more significant. Who knows? Maybe one day it will live up to its potential. It has so much natural resource and proximity to offer with beautiful barrier islands, a historic downtown and easy access via I-40 to Raleigh/Durham and points north and south.
Wilmington's story is basically the same as Charleston, Savannah, Mobile, etc. When transportation and economic development started favoring the railroad and reliance on a more agriculture-based economy began declining, the old port cities didn't have a chance and that's when the Piedmont cities blew up.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2017, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, California
459 posts, read 341,189 times
Reputation: 411
Birmingham, Alabama.....for sure.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2017, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,944 posts, read 2,217,055 times
Reputation: 2611
If Spokane didn't slump after 1960 and had similar growth rates as Boise it would be much larger.

Spokane
1960: 181,608
2016: 215,973
Change: 34,365

Boise:
1960: 34,481
2016: 223,154
Change: 188,673

Spokane could have easily had a population of 370,281 by now.

Looking at metro areas

Spokane
1960: 303,131
2016: 556,634
Change: 253,503

Boise
1960: 168,270
2016: 691,423
Change: 523,153

Spokane metro area could've had a metro area of 826,284 by now, and if we add in Coeur d'Alene it could have had probably a 1 million plus metro area.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top