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Old 10-18-2017, 11:41 PM
 
Location: Land of Ill Noise
956 posts, read 1,774,128 times
Reputation: 636

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Quote:
Originally Posted by true_wu View Post
Chattanooga, Tennessee is one of the greatest examples. Everything was in place for it to be a great City, Rail lines the Tennessee River running through town for shipping and various businesses like Coca-Cola that was starting in the city and becoming big. But the old money in the city wanting it to remain small so they use their influence to keep it that way and a lot of the things that would have happened in Chattanooga moved down the road to Atlanta.
That is interesting about Chattanooga. Like I wonder what sort of things occurred with those who were NIMBY like, that prevented the growth of industries that chose to locate in Atlanta instead? At least Chattanooga seems to have had a rebirth in interest and growth, in recent years. With things like the aquarium, that were built in downtown Chattanooga.

I'm not 100% sure, but sometimes I wonder if some thought Toledo, OH would be a bigger town than it turned out to be? There was some industrialist that gave a lot of money for the Toledo Museum of Art to be created, which still remains one of the very few tourist draws to that city. Besides also the Toledo Mud Hens minor league stadium.
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Old 10-19-2017, 01:05 AM
 
Location: South Austin, 78745
2,983 posts, read 2,137,389 times
Reputation: 5092
I'd say Cairo, Illinois should have been a major US metropolis around a million population, being that it's the junction where the Ohio River dumps into the Mississippi River.

The Missouri River dumps into the Mississippi River right near St Louis. Pittsburgh is where the Alleghenny River and the Monogahela River meet and form the Ohio River. It just seems to me that Cairo kinda got the short end of the stick. I think should be at least the size of Memphis and possibly even St Louis, instead it's just barely 3,000 people who live there.. It should be be way bigger than 3,000 people.
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Old 10-19-2017, 06:26 AM
 
Location: Nashua, NH
111 posts, read 173,629 times
Reputation: 176
I always wondered why Halifax, Nova Scotia didn't become a much larger city. Like something to the effect of being Canada's Boston of sorts since it's the chief seaport city on Canada's Atlantic coast.
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Old 10-19-2017, 08:56 AM
 
7,698 posts, read 4,554,568 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by true_wu View Post
Chattanooga, Tennessee is one of the greatest examples. Everything was in place for it to be a great City, Rail lines the Tennessee River running through town for shipping and various businesses like Coca-Cola that was starting in the city and becoming big. But the old money in the city wanting it to remain small so they use their influence to keep it that way and a lot of the things that would have happened in Chattanooga moved down the road to Atlanta.
My mother, who grew up in Richmond, says the city did the same thing.
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Old 10-20-2017, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Calera, AL
1,160 posts, read 1,441,208 times
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Angus, Iowa. I guarantee nobody here has ever heard of it, because it's been disincorporated for over a century.

It was a coal-mining hub located about 50 miles northwest of Des Moines. At its peak, it had about 5000 people (not at all a small town by late 19th century standards). It was primed to rival, if not surpass, Des Moines as the largest city in the state. However, by 1900 or so, the coal mining industry in the area went from boom to bust, and the town died with the coal company (which was basically the only reason the town existed in the first place). If the town didn't lack the foresight to diversify its economy, who knows what it would look like today.
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Old 10-26-2017, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Land of Ill Noise
956 posts, read 1,774,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xi Chi Ping View Post
Without a doubt Huntsville in AL, because of space center
For whatever reason, Hunstville doesn't strike me as a city where I thought it should've been bigger. It's a fine city for its size, just not my favorite one I've visited. Never mind this was YEARS and years ago when I visited, so I don't know what I would think of it if I revisited it today? And another factor not in Huntsville's favor, is that it only has one interstate(a spur off of I-65) that serves that city, but no other expressways. At least a bunch of the highways that run into Huntsville have been upgraded to 4 lane roads, though.

The one I often think about myself, is Richmond, VA. I just thought with the centralized location it has, that it'd become a bigger city. Ah well, thinking about which cities should've been bigger(and ended up not being) is a funny thing, since it can sometimes be hard to think of such cities and towns myself.

BTW for the person who mentioned Cairo, IL, it used to be bigger than Paduach, KY many decades ago. But over time jobs went away from that town and Paducah started to boom, and as a result the main small city population center of that very southern IL area/far west KY area shifted to Paducah. Not sure if Cairo was ever bigger than say Cape Girardeau, MO, but that's something I might look up on my own another time.
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Old 04-22-2019, 01:29 PM
 
108 posts, read 40,561 times
Reputation: 121
As recently as 1980 we could have had a seismic shift. If Microsoft had stayed in Albuquerque, and Beezos continued to live in New Mexico and based Amazon out of Albuquerque, it could have easily boomed in the same way Seattle did. There's a good chance Albuquerque would have a metro population of around 3 million and Seattle would be under 2 million. Crazy right?
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Old 04-22-2019, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Boston
2,194 posts, read 1,295,467 times
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Alberquerque and Hartford
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Old 04-22-2019, 02:15 PM
 
1,089 posts, read 1,786,312 times
Reputation: 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by SonySegaTendo617 View Post
For whatever reason, Hunstville doesn't strike me as a city where I thought it should've been bigger. It's a fine city for its size, just not my favorite one I've visited. Never mind this was YEARS and years ago when I visited, so I don't know what I would think of it if I revisited it today? And another factor not in Huntsville's favor, is that it only has one interstate(a spur off of I-65) that serves that city, but no other expressways. At least a bunch of the highways that run into Huntsville have been upgraded to 4 lane roads, though.

The one I often think about myself, is Richmond, VA. I just thought with the centralized location it has, that it'd become a bigger city. Ah well, thinking about which cities should've been bigger(and ended up not being) is a funny thing, since it can sometimes be hard to think of such cities and towns myself. It was traditionally a cotton town in the middle of a rural and relatively poor region.

BTW for the person who mentioned Cairo, IL, it used to be bigger than Paduach, KY many decades ago. But over time jobs went away from that town and Paducah started to boom, and as a result the main small city population center of that very southern IL area/far west KY area shifted to Paducah. Not sure if Cairo was ever bigger than say Cape Girardeau, MO, but that's something I might look up on my own another time.
Huntsville grew because of the space program and missile arms race. I wouldn't put in in the categories of smaller cities that should be bigger, it's probably in the opposite. If it wasn't randomly picked as the place for the research and development of the German rocket scientists, it would still probably have less than 50K people today.
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Old 04-22-2019, 02:17 PM
 
1,089 posts, read 1,786,312 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
Galveston was a rival of NYC until the hurricane of 1900.
That's a stretch I know I've heard it referred to as the "New York of the South" in the past, but in the year 1900 New York City already almost had 3.5 million people. Galveston had about 40K around the time of the Hurricane.
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