U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-26-2017, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Katy,Texas
3,510 posts, read 1,709,849 times
Reputation: 2223

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Wait how is the Bay Area one area yet DC and Baltimore not?
The Bay Area is very connected and urbanized around the bay. Baltimore suburbs touch D.C suburbs on two occasions andd the rest of he boundary is a mixture of farmland and parkland.
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.1202...4,13z?hl=en-us
20 years it will be more connected.

The Bay Area is connected in two suburbs but the density is already there the other areas show barely any connection besides a high highway density.
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Sa...7e4dc?hl=en-us
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Sa...7e4dc?hl=en-us
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-26-2017, 05:32 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
2,482 posts, read 2,232,846 times
Reputation: 2353
Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
I consider Chicago and Chicagoland in many ways as being synonomous. The metro area means far more than the city. So obviously I'm in total disageement with you
Residents of the city of Chicago would not agree with you. So help you God if you're a suburbanite who claims to be from Chicago.

That being said, Chicago has crafted the image of Chicagoland with itself at the center. All the suburbs get caught up in its orbit. The city just happens to have contempt for all of those said suburbs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2017, 06:05 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,750 posts, read 6,164,820 times
Reputation: 3601
@the Resident09

"North American Urban Agglomerations

04. Chicago, United States: 9,800,000
05. Washington, United States: 8,350,000 <<<Nothing Baltimore is conspicuously absent here.
06. San Francisco, United States: 7,600,000"


Don't forget you said this:
"DC shines in all metrics without Baltimore. The only thing it adds is total population and total GDP, no added diversity, median income, TPI, or immigration percentages are better with the inclusion of Baltimore. Relax, y'all aren't that important"


It might happen DC's influence in the CSA keeps strengthening while Baltimore's is just...Baltimore.


A DC poster had the check the other DC posters from doing the very thing that you need from of.

"For DC, easily MSA. Adding Baltimore gives the false sense of believing that DC is about the same size as Chicago when it isn't."

This was all from jiust one thread.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2017, 06:19 PM
 
7,744 posts, read 4,592,970 times
Reputation: 8460
DC and Baltimore are completely distinct metros that happen to abut each other. I know people on this site like to geek out on commuter patterns, but DC and Baltimore are so distinct that natives have different accents. They’re culturally dissimilar. They’re even two separate media markets.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2017, 06:34 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,996 posts, read 3,474,581 times
Reputation: 2473
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
@the Resident09

"North American Urban Agglomerations

04. Chicago, United States: 9,800,000
05. Washington, United States: 8,350,000 <<<Nothing Baltimore is conspicuously absent here.
06. San Francisco, United States: 7,600,000"


Don't forget you said this:
"DC shines in all metrics without Baltimore. The only thing it adds is total population and total GDP, no added diversity, median income, TPI, or immigration percentages are better with the inclusion of Baltimore. Relax, y'all aren't that important"


It might happen DC's influence in the CSA keeps strengthening while Baltimore's is just...Baltimore.


A DC poster had the check the other DC posters from doing the very thing that you need from of.

"For DC, easily MSA. Adding Baltimore gives the false sense of believing that DC is about the same size as Chicago when it isn't."

This was all from jiust one thread.
I'm lost, you just made my point for me. Once again what is DC gaining by mentioning Baltimore beyond total CSA population or GDP? And when have I or anyone else stated because of these that DC is more important? DC's MSA is already the 2nd largest on the EC and 3rd largest East of the Mississippi, without Baltimore, so what is your point? I can tell this topic touches you inside but trust to the rest of us, it's not that serious.

Also that urban agglomerations was a copy and paste post, continue to read the entire thread. I didn't post the cities names. I always hyphenate DC-Baltimore when talking of regional population or GDP outside MSA etc.

Last edited by the resident09; 09-26-2017 at 06:43 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2017, 06:37 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,996 posts, read 3,474,581 times
Reputation: 2473
Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
DC and Baltimore are completely distinct metros that happen to abut each other. I know people on this site like to geek out on commuter patterns, but DC and Baltimore are so distinct that natives have different accents. They’re culturally dissimilar. They’re even two separate media markets.
Correct and that's exactly what defines them as a CSA:


"A combined statistical area (CSA) is composed of adjacent metropolitan (MSA) and micropolitan statistical areas (µSA) in the United States and Puerto Rico that can demonstrate economic or social linkage. The United States Office of Management and Budget defines a CSA as consisting of various combinations of adjacent metropolitan and micropolitan areas with economic ties measured by commuting patterns. These areas that combine retain their own designations as metropolitan or micropolitan statistical areas within the larger combined statistical area.

The primary distinguishing factor between a CSA and an MSA/µSA is that the social and economic ties between the individual MSAs/µSAs within a CSA are at lower levels than between the counties within an MSA.[1] CSAs represent multiple metropolitan or micropolitan areas that have an employment interchange of at least 15% with the central county or counties of the parent MSA/µSA.[2] CSAs often represent regions with overlapping labor and media markets."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2017, 06:43 PM
 
7,744 posts, read 4,592,970 times
Reputation: 8460
Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
Correct and that's exactly what defines them as a CSA:


"A combined statistical area (CSA) is composed of adjacent metropolitan (MSA) and micropolitan statistical areas (µSA) in the United States and Puerto Rico that can demonstrate economic or social linkage. The United States Office of Management and Budget defines a CSA as consisting of various combinations of adjacent metropolitan and micropolitan areas with economic ties measured by commuting patterns. These areas that combine retain their own designations as metropolitan or micropolitan statistical areas within the larger combined statistical area.

The primary distinguishing factor between a CSA and an MSA/µSA is that the social and economic ties between the individual MSAs/µSAs within a CSA are at lower levels than between the counties within an MSA.[1] CSAs represent multiple metropolitan or micropolitan areas that have an employment interchange of at least 15% with the central county or counties of the parent MSA/µSA.[2] CSAs often represent regions with overlapping labor and media markets."
Everyone on this board knows how CSA is defined. The point is that it’s not a real reflection of a cohesive metro. The census also defines Libyans as white. Are we going to use that as the gold standard, as well?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2017, 06:54 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,996 posts, read 3,474,581 times
Reputation: 2473
Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Everyone on this board knows how CSA is defined. The point is that it’s not a real reflection of a cohesive metro. The census also defines Libyans as white. Are we going to use that as the gold standard, as well?
The definitions are too broad for CSA boundaries because they use entire counties, we know that much. There is a purpose however, not all cities or metro areas or CSA's have the same setup or interactions. We've all gone over this on C-D. There are dual or tri city regions of the country that we compare to one central city metro and everyone gets into a hoopla when they feel a region is misrepresented. We're never going to really be able to change this.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2017, 06:54 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,750 posts, read 6,164,820 times
Reputation: 3601
Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
I'm lost, you just made my point for me. Once again what is DC gaining by mentioning Baltimore beyond total CSA population or GDP? And when have I or anyone else stated because of these that DC is more important? DC's MSA is already the 2nd largest on the EC and 3rd largest East of the Mississippi, without Baltimore, so what is your point? I can tell this topic touches you inside but trust to the rest of us, it's not that serious.

Also that urban agglomerations was a copy and paste post, continue to read the entire thread. I didn't post the cities names. I always hyphenate DC-Baltimore when talking of regional population or GDP outside MSA etc.
Don't start tripping over your words now.

You wanted proof, you got proof, your own words no less. Lol
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2017, 07:02 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,996 posts, read 3,474,581 times
Reputation: 2473
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Don't start tripping over your words now.

You wanted proof, you got proof, your own words no less. Lol
There is no proof of what your premise of tacking on Baltimore for gain was. All you did was post quotes of me mentioning DC and Baltimore in the same sentence, while various metrics were being discussed. Give it a break bro.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top