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Old 09-27-2017, 10:15 AM
 
29,873 posts, read 27,324,185 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
Actually, it does. It's the 32nd largest in the country and adds two micropolitan areas.
I stand corrected; this must be a relatively recent thing. But the MSA represents the area just fine. It certainly isn't in the same category as the NC Triangle, the NC Triad, the Bay Area, etc. in that regard.
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Old 09-27-2017, 10:21 AM
 
Location: crafton pa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjv007 View Post
To me, there are three main types of metros in the United States, with numerous subcategories. These groupings are not always clear-cut obviously and certain cities/metros may overlap among them, but here goes.
The first type of metro is headed and clearly anchored by a singular, large city. The metro may and often does include notable, historic, and charming suburbs, but there is a marked difference in style and form between city and suburb. Also, satellite cities do exist but none rival the might of the chief city in the metro. This is arguably the most common example of metro and includes cities such as New York, Chicago, and Philadelphia.
The second type of metro is the poly-centric variety. Here, a metro is comprised of two or more major or relatively major cities which rose up independently. In this scenario, the metro's premier city generally ends up representing the entire metro despite the fact that multiple cities play a significant role. These types of metros are sometimes best represented as mini regions and as such are often reflected in CSA rather than MSA calculations. Examples include San Francisco (San Jose, and to some extend Oakland), Boston (Providence), and the NC Research Triangle. Some might include the Washington D.C. connection with Baltimore in this category while others see them as separate cities simply located in close proximity. As the world grows smaller, New York and Philadelphia begin to move into this category in the eyes of some.
The third metro category is the regional city. The most famous example of this is the Los Angeles metro area. Here, the metro is difficult to define because it stretches for thousands of miles of relatively dense suburbia/un-dense urban form. These cities are not often lauded for bustling downtowns but remain near their core city's level of density for extensive expanses outside city limits. These cities often have scattered nodes of development and suburbs with large boundaries and fairly large populations as well. Other examples may include Atlanta and Houston.
These categorizations don't very articulately account for all variations but I see it as something of a start. What about twin cities like Minneapolis-St. Paul? What about Dallas with semi-peer city but not really, Fort Worth? What about Seattle with Tacoma in a Fort-Worth like situation plus a "boom-burg" like Bellevue? What about all the situations where certain counties can realistically go to two different metros?
Thoughts on my analysis?


Did you really mean this sentence? LA's metro may be large, but certainly you can't really believe it's that large!
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Old 09-27-2017, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Boston
2,190 posts, read 1,293,245 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
I only live 7 miles away from the NYC border, and that vast majority of people I know do not work in NYC.

And there is an obvious cultural difference between city folk and suburbanities, although there is overlap of course depending on the person.

It might be different for somewhere like Atlanta where people refer to College Park, Decatur, and other suburbs of ATL "Atlanta", but people don't do that with NYC and Philly.
Most people in this country don't understand that in the northeastern cities (Baltimore and north). That this is a huuuuge deal. Due to racial redlining, built environment and how weak (or in New Englands case non existent county governments shape life. You can tell them that just outside of Boston is a world different than Boston and they like "yeah okay but.." I have to slow them down and say "NO, its really different, it is not the same." They just don't have the concept of why that matters until they move to the area..They'll just write you off as some type of tribal racist or some type of hood rat.
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Old 09-27-2017, 10:28 AM
 
29,873 posts, read 27,324,185 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
Most people in this country don't understand that in the northeastern cities (Baltimore and north). That this is a huuuuge deal. Due to racial redlining, built environment and how weak (or in New Englands case non existent county governments shape life. You can tell them that just outside of Boston is a world different than Boston and they like "yeah okay but.." I have to slow them down and say "NO, its really different, it is not the same." They just don't have the concept of why that matters until they move to the area..They'll just write you off as some type of tribal racist or some type of hood rat.
So you're telling me that the Cambridge experience and the Boston experience are worlds apart???
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Old 09-27-2017, 11:13 AM
 
Location: ATLANTA
2,128 posts, read 1,426,173 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
I only live 7 miles away from the NYC border, and that vast majority of people I know do not work in NYC.

And there is an obvious cultural difference between city folk and suburbanities, although there is overlap of course depending on the person.

It might be different for somewhere like Atlanta where people refer to College Park, Decatur, and other suburbs of ATL "Atlanta", but people don't do that with NYC and Philly.

Your right with this one, don't dare say your from Philly when you live across the bridge in Pennsauken or Cherry Hill.. That's South Jersey buddy, all day long and you would probably look crazy saying that...
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Old 09-27-2017, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Boston
2,190 posts, read 1,293,245 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
So you're telling me that the Cambridge experience and the Boston experience are worlds apart???
Precisely! The majority of Bostonians live south of the Mass Pike, which is a HUGE divider for the city Camberville/Allston-Brighton and and to a lesser extent downtown Boston are one thing.

The rest of Boston is a totally different thing culturally and in its governance and laws than Cambridge.

There are people in Boston that don't know Harvard is in Cambridge or which train line to get on to get to Cambridge, I kid you not.

Older cities in the northeast have very strong civic pride and neighborhood pride and simply take those boundaries more seriously than places elsewhere-they are not superficial in that sense like people on this board claim.

But more so I'm talking about places like Needham, Newton, Canton, Watertown, Lynnfield, Peabody and the like. The very surban and green areas near Boston. They still bus minorities into these communities so they can experience suburbia-they do not bus whites into Boston. Cambridge/Revere/Chelsea/Brookline/Everett/Malden are as connected as you can get but i went to a hair stylist in Malden and she had moved from Boston and kept telling me about how the people in Malden are odd/strange as though he had moved to a different state-mind you she is originally from Florida.

On top of that high school like CRLS and Malden and Revere and so on will never play a Boston High School because Boston does all of its sports in its own City League that divides the city North and South. and would be just as likely to play a prep school or public school form new jersey at it would be to play Milton High. This keeps the cultures of the towns very very different even if they all are urban. Revere High and its family households are Hispanic and Italian, Malden is true melting pot, Bostons families are primarily black and latino and here are some working class irish and some yuppies and some Vietnamese, Cambridge is primarily white and asian with some black and very few latinos, Milton is upper middle class white and black, Chelsea is nearly entirely latino with a few progressive whites. But the thing is people in these towns/cities generally don't know a ton about the town that is not directly adjacent.

In Cambridge there is happy hour, in Boston there is not. In Everett you can by flavored tobacco products at 18 in Boston you must be 21 and no flavors. In impoverished Chelsea there are no rights on red, in Boston there are. And these idiosyncrasies go on and on. IN most of the land mass of Boston you will not notice many undergraduates. In Cambridge they seem to be the dominant group.

Cambridge is Liberal Progressive, Boston is more just Democratic with a blue collar vibe.

Bostons had an Irish male mayor for the past 100 years with the exception of Thomas Menino, an Italian. Cambridge has a black, female mayor. Newton has a black male mayor despite having few blacks..Boston just had its first black male make it to the general mayoral election in 30 years.

Boston has a strong mayoral system in Cambridge the city Council controls all and appoints a mayor..

I hope this is enough to illustrate my point..

Last edited by BostonBornMassMade; 09-27-2017 at 11:59 AM..
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Old 09-27-2017, 11:44 AM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,804 posts, read 1,295,354 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
Its because comparing city limits becomes almost meaningless with the trend of many cities in the sunbelt and corn belt annexing much of their suburbs. At that point you are not comparing similar things at all.
That isn't necessarily true that the sunbelt cities are annexing their suburbs. SLC for example is under 200k, but the metro is more like a million and a half I believe. Dallas, Miami and Atlanta are other cities where the city proper is much smaller than the metro.

Dallas surprisingly has a very similar percentage of of it's metro population that live in Dallas proper that Chicago has with Chicagoland (Dallas 1.3 million to DFW 7.1 million vs Chicago 2.7 million to Chicagoland 9.47)

It seems more common that a metro be underrepresented by a large margin for having a small center city than a city be over represented by having a large center city even in the sunbelt. Phoenix seems to be the exception.
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Old 09-27-2017, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Indianapolis, IN
571 posts, read 842,693 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Chicago end at their city limits.
Not necessarily true...There are a few western and southern burbs that has still has that Chicago feel. Even some of NW Indiana feels like Chicago.
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Old 09-27-2017, 11:53 AM
 
Location: ATLANTA
2,128 posts, read 1,426,173 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sirrob View Post
Not necessarily true...There are a few western and southern burbs that has still has that Chicago feel. Even some of NW Indiana feels like Chicago.
True
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Old 09-27-2017, 12:43 PM
 
9,383 posts, read 9,529,334 times
Reputation: 5786
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
Most people in this country don't understand that in the northeastern cities (Baltimore and north). That this is a huuuuge deal. Due to racial redlining, built environment and how weak (or in New Englands case non existent county governments shape life. You can tell them that just outside of Boston is a world different than Boston and they like "yeah okay but.." I have to slow them down and say "NO, its really different, it is not the same." They just don't have the concept of why that matters until they move to the area..They'll just write you off as some type of tribal racist or some type of hood rat.
It's true. Each town is completely autonomous. Even for things like the MBTA Everett made bus lands that literally end it the town line because Malden didn't want to Continue them.
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