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Old 10-04-2017, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,111 posts, read 1,304,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
What is the fare? I'm pretty sure it is a small fraction of what it is costs to drive a car. Car drivers also pay a gas tax.
$121 per month for unlimited bus and subway use. Just earlier this year it was $116/month. And honestly service doesn't seem to have gotten any better. In fact it actually seems to have gotten worse. That's because around the same time as the fare hike our governor cut $65 Million from the MTA budget. One of these things has a much greater effect than the other.
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Old 10-04-2017, 08:52 AM
 
21,185 posts, read 30,343,833 times
Reputation: 19590
Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
$121 per month for unlimited bus and subway use. Just earlier this year it was $116/month.
If you consider the hassle/cost of owning a car (payments, depreciation, insurance, gas, maintenance, parking and tolls) it's quite the bargain.
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Old 10-04-2017, 09:04 AM
 
29,874 posts, read 27,333,728 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
If you consider the hassle/cost of owning a car (payments, depreciation, insurance, gas, maintenance, parking and tolls) it's quite the bargain.
You forgot taxes and tickets.
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Old 10-04-2017, 12:38 PM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,571,690 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
If you consider the hassle/cost of owning a car (payments, depreciation, insurance, gas, maintenance, parking and tolls) it's quite the bargain.
Insurance alone would probably cost more than that
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Old 10-04-2017, 01:51 PM
 
2,557 posts, read 2,176,886 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
If you consider the hassle/cost of owning a car (payments, depreciation, insurance, gas, maintenance, parking and tolls) it's quite the bargain.
I used to pay nearly $300 / month to State Farm for auto insurance in Boston. Granted, Boston is a more dense city with a fare amount of traffic collisions, but $300/month just for car insurance is a complete ripoff.

Now, I live and work in Toronto and pay $141 per month for a transit pass - which includes access to all subway, streetcar, and bus routes in the city.

Sold my car, switched to transit. Less costly, reduced stress, less CO2 pollution and good for the environment, increased my daily Fitbit steps and better health. Best decision I ever made.
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Old 10-04-2017, 10:29 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,635,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
Are you willing to pay a higher fare?
Odds are any increase in fare still doesn't make it more expensive than:
- Renewals
- Emissions
- Maintenance
- Gas
- Insurance
- License

In my city it is $64/month for unlimited on both bus and light rail. Personally I think it's a steal. If Phoenix increased it to improve public transit options I absolutely would support it. Here in Arizona the last thing we need is a bunch of asphalt and cars making this city hotter than it needs to be.

Also a higher fare but more expansive service also means:
- Less car accidents
- Less deaths
- Less childhood asthma rates (which are directly correlated to families who live near major arteries)
- Better air quality
- Having less stress sitting in stop and go for almost two hours every day
- Lower rates of obesity
- Higher property values on upzoned land (therefore increasing tax base, which can also mean more public transit expansion and better education)

Someone said public transit is adequate. Ok.... let's see... I live deep in the suburbs. For me to go 12 miles to see my family, it takes 2 hours. How long in a car? Half an hour. So no it's not adequate. Of course when you are looking at saving over 300% of your time you are going to pick the quicker option. I think many would prefer public transit, I think mainly so they can do something on the way to work other than drive (like work or read), but also for many of the other reasons above. But many people are lobbying against it. But it's hard to justify public transit when you would like to do things at home still, if it takes that long to get home.
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Old 10-04-2017, 11:31 PM
 
4,478 posts, read 2,661,399 times
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I don't even pay for transit. My company buys a transit pass for everyone. Great for me, and great for the company...we save gazillions vs. parking. Personally i walk anyway. And use my bike occasionally. And I rent my parking space out for over $2,000 per year, so I actually make money on transportation.
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Old 10-05-2017, 06:14 AM
 
21,185 posts, read 30,343,833 times
Reputation: 19590
Quote:
Originally Posted by bostonkid123 View Post
I used to pay nearly $300 / month to State Farm for auto insurance in Boston. Granted, Boston is a more dense city with a fare amount of traffic collisions, but $300/month just for car insurance is a complete ripoff.

Now, I live and work in Toronto and pay $141 per month for a transit pass - which includes access to all subway, streetcar, and bus routes in the city.

Sold my car, switched to transit. Less costly, reduced stress, less CO2 pollution and good for the environment, increased my daily Fitbit steps and better health. Best decision I ever made.
Exactly, plus if you ever need a car there's always car-sharing companies like Zipcar or the major rental companies like Hertz who have opened "local" branches in urban areas for easy access as well of course as Uber or Lyft.
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Old 10-05-2017, 06:50 AM
 
433 posts, read 257,140 times
Reputation: 549
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Odds are any increase in fare still doesn't make it more expensive than:
- License
Even if you don't have a driver's license you still need an ID card if you want to do anything that requires one (although it'd probably be a bit cheaper than a license, as is the case in my state).
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Old 10-05-2017, 07:49 AM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,804 posts, read 1,297,032 times
Reputation: 3204
I would like to make the point that before Americans had the car craze, there was the bike craze.

Personally I think they offer the best of all worlds, much faster than walking, and great at filling in the "Last mile" and offer much of the personal freedom of the car.

Most American Cities do not have the population or density to justify rail service, but most would benefit a ton from extra bike infrastructure which is actually pretty cheap to build and maintain.

From a money ball approach to urbanism, I would go for bikes any day of the week.

I'll use my hometown as an example of this: Boise and the greater Treasure Valley has pretty terrible public transit and outside the core it tends to sprawl quite a bit. Back in the 60s they began building the Greenbelt through downtown which runs sort of like a "bike transit line" directly through most of the city. In highschool I could meet my buddies downtown in 30 min (regardless of rush hour or not) and only have to cross one intersection in the process. Driving only took 15 min, but that was provided there was no slowdown. During rush hour biking was about the same if not quicker.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boise_greenbelt

Of course there is alot more the city could do to make cycling safer, and even a small improvement in the terrible bus system would probably boost our bus numbers alot, but even as is, about 5% of people in Boise bike, walk or take the bus to work vs the 4.4% in Dallas,my current city, which has the longest light rail system in the US.

I'm not saying that bikes will fix everything but most mid sized (and even large) cities would be much better off building a safe bike network than buying billion dollar toy trains like they are Mr Rodgers.

Last edited by Treasurevalley92; 10-05-2017 at 07:57 AM..
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