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Old 09-28-2017, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,112 posts, read 1,304,477 times
Reputation: 1825

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Quote:
Originally Posted by djesus007 View Post
I didn't read the whole thread, so excuse me if this was already mentioned. But besides U.S cities being car-centric, promote sprawl and not investing in transit infrastructure, I noticed when living in the states that people get looked down upon when using transit. So not only do we have urban planning failures, but also classist divides/attitudes of people who own cars v.s public transit users. Now with younger generations focusing more on transit/bike lanes, this point of view will decrease, but nonetheless, it's still a problem I find.
Very well said. All of this also leads to a lack of political will to take an interest in transit as well which makes it difficult for the very few transit-friendly cities to even think about making improvements or expansions since they can't get fundig. I hope this changes. I think that public transit is the future and American cities need to think more about sustainability and build our major cities smarter and more responsibly.
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Old 09-28-2017, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Lone Mountain Las Vegas NV
12,796 posts, read 4,837,023 times
Reputation: 5681
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Do you read what you cite>? If you look past the rhetoric it supports my position. Roads are supported by the general population as infrastructure and by driver for automobile use. And I would also point out the biggest user is the trucking industry which may well not cover its part of the cost.
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Old 09-28-2017, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,749,193 times
Reputation: 8803
Quote:
Originally Posted by lvmensch View Post
Do you read what you cite>? If you look past the rhetoric it supports my position. Roads are supported by the general population as infrastructure and by driver for automobile use. And I would also point out the biggest user is the trucking industry which may well not cover its part of the cost.
Meaning that I, we, subsidize your roads.
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Old 09-28-2017, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Lone Mountain Las Vegas NV
12,796 posts, read 4,837,023 times
Reputation: 5681
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Meaning that I, we, subsidize your roads.
No WE subsidize our roads.
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Old 09-28-2017, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Montreal/Miami/Toronto
974 posts, read 633,154 times
Reputation: 1033
Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
Very well said. All of this also leads to a lack of political will to take an interest in transit as well which makes it difficult for the very few transit-friendly cities to even think about making improvements or expansions since they can't get funding. I hope this changes. I think that public transit is the future and American cities need to think more about sustainability and build our major cities smarter and more responsibly.
I believe the U.S government should give more autonomy to states regarding transport. I know at city levels the issue is taken more seriously, and it seems the higher you go in the government structure, the less they care about transit investments. Now I don't know what this administration will do transit-wise, but maybe the establishment of a transit fund, where some cities per year get federal funding for transit projects or establishments with PPP is another option. I'll have to do my research on laws and legislature for this particular subject because it's an important one.
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Old 09-28-2017, 09:29 PM
 
4,480 posts, read 2,661,399 times
Reputation: 4085
In my state, non-drivers subsidize a large percentage of road funding.

Of course everyone is responsible for some road use, but 10% of the road system would be plenty for the supply chains, walking, occasional transit use, and occasional bicycling I'm involved with.

Regarding where public money should go...obviously we need to control public spending, while devoting particular attention to peak times. The only way to add capacity for dense urban areas at peak times at reasonable prices is transit. That's even before parking is considered...parking at true urban-downtown densities is almost geometrically impossible...you have to build your city like Dallas to make it work.
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Old 09-29-2017, 07:12 AM
 
9,382 posts, read 9,532,267 times
Reputation: 5786
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
In my state, non-drivers subsidize a large percentage of road funding.

Of course everyone is responsible for some road use, but 10% of the road system would be plenty for the supply chains, walking, occasional transit use, and occasional bicycling I'm involved with.

Regarding where public money should go...obviously we need to control public spending, while devoting particular attention to peak times. The only way to add capacity for dense urban areas at peak times at reasonable prices is transit. That's even before parking is considered...parking at true urban-downtown densities is almost geometrically impossible...you have to build your city like Dallas to make it work.
Places like Pittsburgh, Hampton Roads, Denver, and Clevelands Mass Transit systems are like 80% publicly funded.
The vast majority of Public transit users ride the Bus on roads, 20% of Frieght miles (probably close to 100% of freight) is shipped by road.

Roads are not some suburban conspiracy.
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Old 09-29-2017, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Northeast states
10,674 posts, read 8,182,570 times
Reputation: 2898
It not that bad in NYC and Chicago
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Old 09-29-2017, 08:40 AM
 
2,557 posts, read 2,176,886 times
Reputation: 1810
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
In my state, non-drivers subsidize a large percentage of road funding.

Of course everyone is responsible for some road use, but 10% of the road system would be plenty for the supply chains, walking, occasional transit use, and occasional bicycling I'm involved with.

Regarding where public money should go...obviously we need to control public spending, while devoting particular attention to peak times. The only way to add capacity for dense urban areas at peak times at reasonable prices is transit. That's even before parking is considered...parking at true urban-downtown densities is almost geometrically impossible...you have to build your city like Dallas to make it work.
Agreed, and I don't think anyone is proposing that we increase public transit investment across the board for every town, every county, and every municipality. In many cases, the population density in cities such as suburban Houston or Atlanta simply doesn't justify expensive subways or light rail. A simple Bus Rapid Transit with protected lanes, articulated buses, and good frequency are more than sufficient, and can be done at a fraction of the time and cost. And in the future, when ridership does indeed grow, these cities can then look at upgrading existing bus routes and lanes into light rail or heavy rail, as long as there is population density and ridership to justify the investment.

Below is an example of a suburban municipality outside of Toronto, taking the first step towards improving their public transport with a simple protected bus lane. This guarantees speed and frequency, with fast implementation and minimal investment.


- Source, Viva Bus Rapid Transit Toronto, Wiki Commons
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Old 09-29-2017, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
5,311 posts, read 5,327,543 times
Reputation: 3562
Quote:
Originally Posted by BPt111 View Post
It not that bad in NYC and Chicago
Problem is that together, they represent a very small % of the total people in the US. And not all places in those metros have good PT.

If you added up all the people in the USA that have good transit as an option, I can't imagine it exceeds 20% of the total population. And "good" is contextual for the USA in terms of quality, cleanliness, effectiveness.
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