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Old 09-27-2017, 03:33 PM
 
2,783 posts, read 1,628,289 times
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I keep hearing people throw around the term "Legacy city". I'm wondering what a true legacy city is. Obviously NYC and Chicago are, I think Boston and Philadelphia would qualify, Detroit probably still would. What about Baltiomre, Cleveland and Pittsburgh . Heck for that matter what about D.C? I've always thought of legacy cities as being densely populated old cities in the N.E region of the U.S, with an impressive skyline and current or former industry. Obviously D.C doesn't meat some of those requirements but it sure gets treated like a legacy city on here.
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Old 09-27-2017, 03:35 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,739 posts, read 6,134,571 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turnerbro View Post
I keep hearing people throw around the term "Legacy city". I'm wondering what a true legacy city is. Obviously NYC and Chicago are, I think Boston and Philadelphia would qualify, Detroit probably still would. What about Baltiomre, Cleveland and Pittsburgh . Heck for that matter what about D.C? I've always thought of legacy cities as being densely populated old cities in the N.E region of the U.S, with an impressive skyline and current or former industry. Obviously D.C doesn't meat some of those requirements but it sure gets treated like a legacy city on here.
Baltimore has the "old" and densely populated part right.
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Old 09-27-2017, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Alaska
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Great history/architecture.

It had to have had a significant role in building the country.
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Old 09-27-2017, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Denver
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I would consider so the cities you listed as legacy cities.
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Old 09-27-2017, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Tampa - St. Louis
1,090 posts, read 1,626,102 times
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Legacy Cities are cities that have experienced profound social and economic disruption as a result of fundamental shifts of the global economy in recent decades, and policy decisions made at the local, state, and federal level.

Legacy cities have lost between 20–70% of residents since their mid-century population peak, but are still vibrant, mid-sized cities home to around 50,000 to 1.5 million people each.

Legacy cities are also not confined to the Northeast or Great Lakes. There are a few well known Southern legacy cities.

So basically, Boston, New York, Chicago, etc. wouldn't qualify as legacy cities. Those cities are way too global and way too economically diverse to be considered "legacy cities". Legacy cities are cities that are not as "great" as they used to be. You could easily argue that New York, Boston, Chicago are as vibrant as they have ever been with booming skylines, super diverse populations and economies, and global connectivity.

The most prominent legacy cities by region would be.

Northeast: Baltimore, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Washington D.C. (???), Newark, Providence
Midwest: Detroit, St. Louis, Cleveland, Minneapolis (???), Milwaukee, Cincinnati
South: Birmingham, New Orleans, Louisville, Norfolk, Richmond

Legacy Cities Partnership Blog
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Old 09-27-2017, 09:53 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
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I have never heard this term...
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Old 09-27-2017, 10:57 PM
 
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Someone uses a term in a book with one definition, and others piggyback on that, with the definition adapting or taking on entirely new meanings over time...that's how the language works.

I'd consider a legacy city anything that was really big before a certain time. But the definition of big and the timing are vague ideas in my mind, and can vary.
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Old 09-28-2017, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,414 posts, read 11,913,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turnerbro View Post
I keep hearing people throw around the term "Legacy city". I'm wondering what a true legacy city is. Obviously NYC and Chicago are, I think Boston and Philadelphia would qualify, Detroit probably still would. What about Baltiomre, Cleveland and Pittsburgh . Heck for that matter what about D.C? I've always thought of legacy cities as being densely populated old cities in the N.E region of the U.S, with an impressive skyline and current or former industry. Obviously D.C doesn't meat some of those requirements but it sure gets treated like a legacy city on here.
A legacy city is not simply an old city. It's an old city that entered a period of population and job decline in the mid 20th century which it has yet to recover from. Basically it's a rebranding of the term "rust belt" which is inclusive of cities like New Orleans or Birmingham which are outside of the Rust Belt proper.

Older cities which have an urban core which has recovered, like NYC, Boston, and Chicago, are almost universally not considered legacy cities. Baltimore and Philly traditionally are still considered as such, because even though they have healthy metros the urban core still has big problems.

Check out the official website. And here's the study which invented the term.
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Old 09-28-2017, 08:56 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,044 posts, read 35,003,509 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
A legacy city is not simply an old city. It's an old city that entered a period of population and job decline in the mid 20th century which it has yet to recover from. Basically it's a rebranding of the term "rust belt" which is inclusive of cities like New Orleans or Birmingham which are outside of the Rust Belt proper.

Older cities which have an urban core which has recovered, like NYC, Boston, and Chicago, are almost universally not considered legacy cities. Baltimore and Philly traditionally are still considered as such, because even though they have healthy metros the urban core still has big problems.

Check out the official website. And here's the study which invented the term.
This.
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Old 09-28-2017, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,414 posts, read 11,913,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
This.
Yeah. To some degree the rebranding is arbitrary, but the idea of the "legacy" title is basically that since they used to be much larger cities (both in absolute population and in terms of their national ranking) they have a lot of historic infrastructure which newer cities anchoring metros of the same size don't have (historic districts, museums, concert halls, etc).
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