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Old 10-03-2017, 04:17 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,332,488 times
Reputation: 8602

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Facts Kill Rhetoric View Post
North America's Forgotten Cities

To me a forgotten city is one that has had little in the way of change in decades. A city that used to have a large profile back in its heyday but has seemingly been pushed to the side and rarely, if ever, brought up in national or international discussions for topics that are both good or bad. To me, a forgotten city is a place that has suffered from a period of stasis -- which is a prolonged period of time of inactivity. Essentially a place that has stayed trapped as what it was at its peak and has since been passed up by numerous other places, a place where its profile has shrank even though the attributes that got it there are still present.

Think of it this way. We create threads and involve ourselves into discussions, that's a human trait, we do this regardless of whether it is on the Internet or not, we do this in actual life too. You know how some cities have some characteristics that are perfect for a topic or discussion but those cities are still neglected or rarely brought up. For instance, it would be like asking which cities are the most musically influential but it takes 39 pages of discussion for someone to mention a city like Memphis and once someone does that then it makes others wonder why they didn't do it first. It is because of the sedated nature of Memphis' profile, how hidden and out of view the city is from the public conscience and that in and of itself lends to it being a forgotten city.

Memphis but also Buffalo, and Rochester would be my personal picks for this topic. In all three cases you have strong fundamental bones to all three cities, if you visit them, you understand what got them to where they once were but over the decades they have all been passed over by numerous other places. To the point where their profile and recognition has diminished either some or significantly. Sometimes it takes a person saying "Memphis" or "Rochester" to remind myself that yes, this city actually does in fact still exist. That it is, in fact, still relatively populous.

A while back ago, I read an article about how some in Montreal feel that it may be one of the world's forgotten cities, a place people forgot about. I don't agree with the article because Montreal, while not super famous, is hardly forgotten about at all. Its attributes speak for themselves and the city once hosted the most popular sporting event on the planet (the Summer Olympics). That being said, that is not the case with every city, some cities truly are forgotten about.

Lets keep this to Canada, Mexico, and United States.

Could you think of examples that fit the notion of a "Forgotten City" in North America? Which ones and why?
Oh my, what an article.

I'll sum it up for the TLDR crowd: "Things would be so much better in Montreal if only the francophone majority had continued to let the anglophone minority dominate them and run everything like they used to".

Glad this thread hasn't been dominated by Montreal as a so-called forgotten city.
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Old 10-03-2017, 07:17 AM
 
Location: Kennedy Heights, Ohio. USA
1,819 posts, read 1,493,187 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goat314 View Post
Detroit, St. Louis, Baltimore, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Milwaukee, Buffalo, New Orleans, Birmingham all used to have larger profiles, but relatively slow economic growth has definitely hurt their national profiles. Cities like Dallas, Houston, Atlanta, Miami, Denver, Portland, Nashville, Charlotte have really gained from the new economy and have really emerged as shining stars.
Most of the forgotten cities economic well being was tied to manufacturing. When free trade policies and globalization sent manufacturing jobs to China and Mexico the national profile of these cities took on the negative image as Rust Belt economically declining crime ridden old cities. This created a feedback loop in which no one wants to move to a city perceived as such. People moved out of theses cities to find jobs in other newer Sun belt cities and very little people moved in because of the negative image and lack of jobs. Many of these forgotten cities took an "if you can't beat than join them" mentality in trying to mirror Sun Belt cities in overall structural appearance so they demolished their older established building stock in favor of newer modern construction. These cities assumed if they modernized their structural outward appearance people would have a more favorable impression of their city.

What is now happening many of these forgotten cities are now beginning to take steps to attract and retain younger generations of people. In Cincinnati our previous Mayor Mallory partially experimented with Form Based Zoning as to keep new developments from adopting a suburban type form and to conform to the surrounding existence. Our Current Mayor Cranley did away with Form Based Zoning because he only cares about lining his pockets from developers whose only experience and success has come from suburban type developments. Our previous Mayor Mallory tried to modernize the mass transit system as to make car free living a realistic efficient option for city residents. This was vehemently opposed and obstructed by all means possible by Governor Kasich of Ohio and has been actively sabotaged by Mayor Cranley. The good news is Mayor Cranley most likely will be defeated in next month's election because his suburban type policies has been out of date and counterproductive for the future of the city.

Last edited by Coseau; 10-03-2017 at 07:55 AM..
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Old 10-03-2017, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,631 posts, read 8,320,280 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goat314 View Post
Detroit, St. Louis, Baltimore, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Milwaukee, Buffalo, New Orleans, Birmingham all used to have larger profiles, but relatively slow economic growth has definitely hurt their national profiles. Cities like Dallas, Houston, Atlanta, Miami, Denver, Portland, Nashville, Charlotte have really gained from the new economy and have really emerged as shining stars.
Detroit, Saint Louis, Baltimore, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, New Orleans, Cincinnati, and Milwaukee aren't really forgotten cities though.

Detroit is a really famous city worldwide, or should I say infamous worldwide. While not for positive reasons, it definitely isn't forgotten about. It has even become more famous in recent years due to its resurgent core area, it has in many ways become an example of a city that is literally uplifting itself from the ashes. Dan Gilbert's involvement in revitalizing the Downtown, Midtown, and in general core areas of Detroit have become a well known case study. Even my cousins in San Jose know about its core area boom and my cousins, unlike those of us on this forum, are not into city trends or city hobbies, so for it to get out to them means it is beginning to resonate with people in general.

Cleveland has arguably the best athlete in a generation that led them to an NBA title in 2016, all their games and television game viewership is pretty high. New Orleans is one of the country's most beloved tourist destinations and up until a few years ago, it was also a setting for a lot of television shows, movies, and commercials.

If you went to school in America then you know about Saint Louis because of Mark Twain, the Arch, and the industries that had led it to its large profile during the 1800s. Yes, Saint Louis' status in previous decades has diminished significantly but the city is not forgotten about. The Cardinals are still seen as the Gold Standard in the MLB, especially for a smaller market team.

Contrast Saint Louis' situation with Rochester's situation. Unlike Saint Louis which still gets talked about for landmarks and iconic structures, history, literature, and a few other things, Rochester doesn't get talked about at all. When was the last time you saw anyone even mentioned Rochester for sports, for nightlife, for food, for architecture, for shopping, for entertainment, for culture, for neighborhoods, for transit, for suburbs, for economy, for anything? I haven't ever seen it. The only time I see it talked about on this forum is when someone from there or someone living there brings it up. Yet the city has so much to offer and it doesn't even seem to get a look by outsiders. It's even worse in actual life, where the city essentially has an invisible profile. Rarely, if ever, brought up into discussions.

Now a place like Memphis or Rochester, yes definitely. For Rochester in particular, it has to work extra hard, primarily because it doesn't even have professional sports teams. So that one aspect that seems like a given for every other city with at least 1 professional sports team in the Big 5 sports leagues isn't present with Rochester.

Rochester is a pretty formidable city, has a PCSA in excess of 1 million people and is the location of a few major corporations that have their headquarters there in the area. Yet you have to go out of your way to just talk about the place, out of your way to bring it up into a discussion, because you don't then there is little to no chance of it being brought up by someone that has no connections to the place.

I would say it is a forgotten city. While Memphis has NBA, even its NBA team gets lowballed and has a low profile, even a few years back when they were strong contenders in the Western Conference, they were largely seen as passovers by people outside of Memphis. Memphis also has to deal with the reality that it was in the not too distant past the largest city and metropolis in Tennessee. That's no longer the case and likely never will be the case ever again. Nashville, in contrast, is a pretty well known and well regarded city in America, it's profile has upped its game immensely, especially this decade. It has left Memphis to a dark and solemn corner by itself.

Last edited by Trafalgar Law; 10-03-2017 at 11:31 AM..
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Old 10-03-2017, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,332,488 times
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As a non-American but close neighbour, I have to say Memphis definitely has more profile than Rochester. Memphis has Elvis and Graceland, and more broadly a rich historic music angle.
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Old 10-03-2017, 01:00 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
8,962 posts, read 4,103,404 times
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Oklahoma City. Feels like a place stuck in the 1980s.
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Old 10-03-2017, 01:36 PM
 
Location: ATLANTA
2,129 posts, read 1,427,616 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Macon



So True but I see it finally Changing and reemerging in recent Years, especially since Consolidation.. Almost a rebirth of the City of sorts
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Old 10-03-2017, 05:00 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM
706 posts, read 513,188 times
Reputation: 407
Albuquerque, but change is on the way!
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Old 10-03-2017, 09:55 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,796,055 times
Reputation: 11136
Greensboro
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Old 10-04-2017, 01:28 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,420 posts, read 16,953,389 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oobanks View Post
So True but I see it finally Changing and reemerging in recent Years, especially since Consolidation.. Almost a rebirth of the City of sorts
Yes, it sounds like an empty cliche, but Macon truly is on the threshold of something great. The city is located in the heart of Middle Georgia at the nexus of several major rail and truck routes (I-16 / 75 / 475). The largest freeway reconstruction project in the history of Georgia is now underway in downtown Macon at the junction of I-75 and I-16 and the city just landed 2 new airlines at its airport. Most importantly, perhaps, is Macon's proximity to Metro Atlanta -- approximately 80 miles from downtown to downtown and much closer from suburb to suburb.

Macon has great historic bones, a remarkably dense / urban and architecturally beautiful downtown and a ton of civic pride. It's basically right now what Orlando was at the time Disney arrived, and I can see a similar employment boom taking place if and when the right major corporate client announces they are coming to Middle Georgia.
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Old 10-04-2017, 05:04 AM
 
56,546 posts, read 80,847,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
Greensboro
Interesting...Do you mean that on a state level?
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