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Old 10-13-2017, 10:47 AM
 
3,961 posts, read 3,494,500 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drro View Post

Paducah, KY. In fact I hadn't even heard about it since last week. It's somewhere in the middle of nowhere and nobody seems to talk or care about it.
Paducah is just a smaller city that anchors an urban area of about 100k. I don't think it's particularly forgotten, I just don't think most cities its size get that much attention to begin with. It is the center of commerce and communications for a larger region and is the #83 TV market. It's definitely a city I think people should visit, you can tell the leadership is working hard to better position it for the future and new economy. I'm a fan
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Old 10-13-2017, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Quťbec
21,947 posts, read 27,354,178 times
Reputation: 8603
Quote:
Originally Posted by A.J240 View Post
Everyone has an opinion on Detroit, even people outside the US has an opinion on Detroit.
Yup. Detroit may not always be respected but it's rarely forgotten or overlooked.
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Old 10-13-2017, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,691 posts, read 8,756,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Yup. Detroit may not always be respected but it's rarely forgotten or overlooked.
Motown alone puts Detroit on the map for me.
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Old 10-14-2017, 11:19 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
2,480 posts, read 2,226,489 times
Reputation: 2353
Quote:
Originally Posted by lepoisson View Post
St Louis has been forgotten. It used to be one of the largest and most important cities in the country, now it's really only known for the Gateway Arch and crime. Few people want to live in the city.
St. Louis has not been forgotten for the same reasons Cleveland and Detroit have not been forgotten. St. Louis' metropolitan area also hasn't been as frozen in place as somewhere like Cleveland's has.

If anything, St. Louis has sadly become culturally infamous. I'm still a bit surprised that the national media didn't pickup on the Stockley protests as much as they did Ferguson.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mezter View Post
I feel like Cincinnati is kinda forgotten relative to it's previous status.
Eh. Cincinnati is growing again both in the core city and in its larger metropolitan area. That's something most large legacy cities of the Midwest cannot say.

Last edited by PerseusVeil; 10-14-2017 at 11:29 AM..
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Old 10-14-2017, 06:47 PM
 
Location: East Tennessee and Atlanta
3,668 posts, read 8,774,987 times
Reputation: 2503
Quote:
Originally Posted by lepoisson View Post
St Louis has been forgotten. It used to be one of the largest and most important cities in the country, now it's really only known for the Gateway Arch and crime. Few people want to live in the city.
This is so true, I totally agree. A lot of people not living in St Louis may not realize its city population in 1950 was almost 860,000 people and now it has shrunk way down to only 310,000 (2016). Think of the vacant and sparse urban areas with that many people that have disappeared from living inside the city limits the past 65 + years...St Louis is definitely a city that is forgotten these days, and is suffering the rust belt fate...
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Old 10-16-2017, 02:38 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
29 posts, read 24,077 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjbradleynyc View Post
This is so true, I totally agree. A lot of people not living in St Louis may not realize its city population in 1950 was almost 860,000 people and now it has shrunk way down to only 310,000 (2016). Think of the vacant and sparse urban areas with that many people that have disappeared from living inside the city limits the past 65 + years...St Louis is definitely a city that is forgotten these days, and is suffering the rust belt fate...
St. Louis is damaged but itís not forgotten. Itís still a culturally relevant city. It still attracts travelers from around the world. It still has respected universities, museums and dining. In the past 20 years, many neighborhoods have filled in and come back to life. I donít think anyone very familiar with St. Louis would categorize it has forgotten.
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Old 10-16-2017, 01:05 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
434 posts, read 249,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Facts Kill Rhetoric View Post
Could you think of examples that fit the notion of a "Forgotten City" in North America? Which ones and why?
I haven't read through the entire thread so I don't know if this has already been said or not, but how about Winston-Salem, NC?

Salem was settled by the Moravians in the 1750s, and in the 1880s the area started being referred to as Winston-Salem following a merging of the cities of Winston and Salem. Winston-Salem was the largest city in North Carolina by 1920, and the Reynolds Tobacco Company really put the it on the map later that decade as its recently constructed headquarters in downtown was the tallest building in America south of Baltimore and was credited as being the prototype for the Empire State Building in New York.

Winston-Salem continued to grow at a reasonable rate until the '70s at which point its growth waned and languished between 130-140k for the next two decades.

The city is definitely headed in the right direction now, as it has added about 100,000 residents since 1990 (to ~242,000, making it the fifth-largest city in NC), but the relative lack of large-scale development since the 1970s has kept it off the radar of most. Quite a few notable regional and national companies are headquartered there including HanesBrands, Krispy Kreme, and Blue Rhino.

Last edited by nicholas_n; 10-16-2017 at 01:46 PM..
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Old 10-16-2017, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Deep in the Woods
2,558 posts, read 2,680,269 times
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Fresno
Bakersfield
Manchester, NH
Altoona, PA
Harrisburg, PA
Scranton, PA
Jamestown, NY
Roanoke, VA
Gary, IN

Don't hear much about these here cities
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Old 10-26-2017, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Land of Ill Noise
956 posts, read 1,775,158 times
Reputation: 636
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Parkersburg WV
Johnstown PA

Many old Appalachian towns basically frozen in time
A few years back, USA Today did a really good article on how economy prosperous the town of Welch, WV(west of Bluefield and also Princeton, WV, and Roanoke, VA) used to be. Seeing those before and today pics, was really painful to see. Almost reminds me of how certain south side of Chicago neighborhoods have declined, from how they used to be like(i.e. Englewood, Roseland). Wouldn't be surprised if that article may for all I know, still be up on USA Today's website somewhere.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Oh my, what an article.

I'll sum it up for the TLDR crowd: "Things would be so much better in Montreal if only the francophone majority had continued to let the anglophone minority dominate them and run everything like they used to".

Glad this thread hasn't been dominated by Montreal as a so-called forgotten city.
I've visited Montreal before, and I do NOT think it's a forgotten city. Actually the truth about Montreal is that it's VERY billingual, and that someone who doesn't know a lick of French would still feel comfortable visiting that city, Francophone signage laws aside. And isn't an issue that a pocket French-English translator book(I had this on me back when I visited there, and before I had a smartphone) or a Google Translate smartphone app, won't resolve if you see a French sign you don't understand. Also to me it's a very fun city, that I think anyone who speaks English would enjoy. Regardless if you never took an introduction to French class in school or college, or do know French a good bit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Yes, it sounds like an empty cliche, but Macon truly is on the threshold of something great. The city is located in the heart of Middle Georgia at the nexus of several major rail and truck routes (I-16 / 75 / 475). The largest freeway reconstruction project in the history of Georgia is now underway in downtown Macon at the junction of I-75 and I-16 and the city just landed 2 new airlines at its airport. Most importantly, perhaps, is Macon's proximity to Metro Atlanta -- approximately 80 miles from downtown to downtown and much closer from suburb to suburb.

Macon has great historic bones, a remarkably dense / urban and architecturally beautiful downtown and a ton of civic pride. It's basically right now what Orlando was at the time Disney arrived, and I can see a similar employment boom taking place if and when the right major corporate client announces they are coming to Middle Georgia.
I'm not sure why Macon was mentioned in this topic, to me it's such a small city. And where IMO, there are much bigger ones more worth talking about that seem more forgotten to me vs. Macon, no offense to those who live in Macon. That said I've only been there once, and hopefully that city can start to do better with growth in the future.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VintageSunlight View Post
Fresno
Bakersfield
Manchester, NH
Altoona, PA
Harrisburg, PA
Scranton, PA
Jamestown, NY
Roanoke, VA
Gary, IN

Don't hear much about these here cities
I don't know much about Manchester, Altoona, or Jamestown, so I won't comment on those. The others you mentioned yes(say like Scranton, Harrisburg, and Roanoke), are still relevant cities IMO for the parts of the country they're in. I feel really bad about Gary, IN, since I've urban explored a lot of the abandoned buildings there, and it really has some cool history such as City Methodist Church and Palace Theater. They did land a minor league team, but as much as that city tries, they can't quite figure out a way for the downtown to take off like it once did decades ago. The Miller part of that town(eastern Gary) is nice though, and has gotten a nice rebirth in recent years though. Check out 18th Street Brewery and also Miller Beach Cafe, if you do visit Miller. At least their mayor(Karen Freeman-Wilson) seems to be trying, and has good intentions. It'll take a while, for that city to catch up when it comes to redeveloping that city. Maybe if Detroit can redevelop successfully, it could provide a blueprint on strategies for cities like Gary to do?

Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
St. Louis has not been forgotten for the same reasons Cleveland and Detroit have not been forgotten. St. Louis' metropolitan area also hasn't been as frozen in place as somewhere like Cleveland's has.

If anything, St. Louis has sadly become culturally infamous. I'm still a bit surprised that the national media didn't pickup on the Stockley protests as much as they did Ferguson.



Eh. Cincinnati is growing again both in the core city and in its larger metropolitan area. That's something most large legacy cities of the Midwest cannot say.
This got me thinking, forget about those cities since they're definitely not forgotten. I'd actually argue in some ways, Rockford and Peoria seem more forgotten. Both used to pack more muscle as a city, and seem to be slowly fading as cities. Peoria recently lost Caterpillar's headquarters. Though in a way, this issue has been affecting cities all over the Midwest, which used to have more industrial jobs(i.e. Janesville, WI, Galesburg, IL, Danville, IL, Richmond, IN, Anderson, IN, Connersville, IN, etc). And back to Rockford, it isn't lost on me I read some article recently that Naperville was supposedly on the verge of surpassing Rockford, for population.
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Old 11-01-2017, 10:21 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,051,512 times
Reputation: 3485
Butte, MT, Pueblo, CO, Lowell, MA, Youngstown, OH.
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