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Old 10-07-2017, 09:14 AM
 
Location: SE Pennsylvania
368 posts, read 269,914 times
Reputation: 340

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Phoenix will Never surpass Houston. Got to remember Phoenix is in the desert, it will run out of water long before Houston's great economy suddenly dies.

Whats more likely is Houston surpassing Chicago in city population to become 3rd.
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Old 10-07-2017, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,889,772 times
Reputation: 5856
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spreadofknowledge View Post
Phoenix will Never surpass Houston. Got to remember Phoenix is in the desert, it will run out of water long before Houston's great economy suddenly dies.

Whats more likely is Houston surpassing Chicago in city population to become 3rd.
We use less water per person every year, and less than we are allotted. We do not have a water problem
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Old 10-07-2017, 05:32 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,285,072 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Harris County (which I just found out is Houston) is exclusively Houston, not carrying miles and miles of endless desert. If Maricopa's counties were slightly different, including more of Apache Junction and San Tan Valley and forfeiting Gila Bend, our county would be more on par with Harris.
Harris County isn't exclusively Houston: the city corresponds to only a bit more than half the county's population.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
We use less water per person every year, and less than we are allotted. We do not have a water problem
And do you think that Phoenix can handle the massive population influxes it would take to catch up with Houston without any impact to the water situation?
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Old 10-07-2017, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,889,772 times
Reputation: 5856
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
Harris County isn't exclusively Houston: the city corresponds to only a bit more than half the county's population.



And do you think that Phoenix can handle the massive population influxes it would take to catch up with Houston without any impact to the water situation?
We use less water now total than we did 40 years ago with a fraction of the population. The biggest gainer is the reduction of farm land, which has been freeing up tons of water that had been being used to irrigate crops
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Old 10-07-2017, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,651,369 times
Reputation: 3625
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
Harris County isn't exclusively Houston: the city corresponds to only a bit more than half the county's population.



And do you think that Phoenix can handle the massive population influxes it would take to catch up with Houston without any impact to the water situation?
Ah, my apologies

----

Yes, as Firebird already stated, a reduction in farmland, better enforcement on water policies (AZ already has some of the best as it is), and more xeriscaping and artificial turf.
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Old 10-07-2017, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,553 posts, read 720,474 times
Reputation: 2008
If anything, Phoenix might very well be losing population 20 years from now. The water and sustainability issues and global warming are getting worse the fastest in the Southwest, and population growth in general is slowing down worldwide, especially in Western countries.
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Old 10-07-2017, 10:24 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,889,772 times
Reputation: 5856
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
If anything, Phoenix might very well be losing population 20 years from now. The water and sustainability issues and global warming are getting worse the fastest in the Southwest, and population growth in general is slowing down worldwide, especially in Western countries.
We do not have water issues for the 100th time. The "Southwest" water issues are mainly in the California Central Valley, with water being diverted to LA and the Bay Area away from the farms.

For the 100th time, we in Arizona now use less water total than we did 40 years ago, and use well under our allotment

Why does no one outside the region seem to believe that?
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Old 10-07-2017, 11:24 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,651,369 times
Reputation: 3625
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
We do not have water issues for the 100th time. The "Southwest" water issues are mainly in the California Central Valley, with water being diverted to LA and the Bay Area away from the farms.

For the 100th time, we in Arizona now use less water total than we did 40 years ago, and use well under our allotment

Why does no one outside the region seem to believe that?
Cause they'd rather listen to propaganda than actually hear real things from the people who actually live here and deal with it in real life.
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Old 10-07-2017, 11:27 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
5,656 posts, read 7,456,800 times
Reputation: 4322
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
We do not have water issues for the 100th time. The "Southwest" water issues are mainly in the California Central Valley, with water being diverted to LA and the Bay Area away from the farms.

For the 100th time, we in Arizona now use less water total than we did 40 years ago, and use well under our allotment

Why does no one outside the region seem to believe that?
Because they are too lazy to do their own research and it ruins their narrative about Phoenix. There are few things more frustrating than having to do someone else's homework.
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Old 10-08-2017, 05:00 AM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,285,072 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
We use less water now total than we did 40 years ago with a fraction of the population. The biggest gainer is the reduction of farm land, which has been freeing up tons of water that had been being used to irrigate crops
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Yes, as Firebird already stated, a reduction in farmland, better enforcement on water policies (AZ already has some of the best as it is), and more xeriscaping and artificial turf.
The efficiency of water usage is good, but the population growth that can be managed under that can only be so much. Unless people have to get used to skipping showers/bathing?
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