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Old 10-08-2017, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,635,459 times
Reputation: 3625

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
The efficiency of water usage is good, but the population growth that can be managed under that can only be so much. Unless people have to get used to skipping showers/bathing?
People in low-income areas tend to do pretty well. Compton averages about 65 gallons of water per capita per day, whereas Beverly Hills by comparison is over 200. Water usage is directly tied to income levels, which is why Arizona does so “poorly” on it, because water is cheap here and we don’t have a horrid job market.

We are a net producer of electricity yet our electric bills are higher than our water... why is that?

Making water more expensive like they do in New Mexico can bring the water usage down.

Switching higher efficiency appliances do most of the work for municipalities. Ag and industry (lots of water needed for mining) are a whole other story.
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Old 10-08-2017, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
47 posts, read 36,691 times
Reputation: 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by Facts Kill Rhetoric View Post
The decline of the energy sector is not a factor in any sort of exodus. The energy sector, as it is, is in better shape in 2017 than it was in 2015 or 2016 when oil prices started coming down, not just in Houston but worldwide. That tends to happen when the value of the commodity doubles from 2016 lows and when other segments of the sector begin to expand more.

Houston actually has larger job growth than the entire state of Arizona (nearly 20,000 more jobs than AZ):

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/metro.t03.htm

Also, Harvey isn't really expected to taper Houston's population growth by much, certainly not enough for Phoenix-proper to be in any position to pass it. Perhaps if Houston gets hit by a Katrina type of storm that brings in wind damage, storm surge, and rainfall as a Category 4 or 5, then there would be some exodus temporarily. However, that is not the case. Harvey struck 170 miles southwest of Houston and its damage on Houston was rainfall. Roofs and powerlines weren't being knocked down or torn apart and ocean water wasn't inundating the city given that the hurricane didn't make a direct hit on the city. Houston got rainfall, which was bad but repairable. Harvey is the type of storm that you can move on from, Maria, which leveled Puerto Rico as it made a direct hit and gave the full brunt of its force, is the type of hurricane that sets you back for years to come. Houston doesn't have to worry about that.
I don't think Harvey will significantly impact Houston's long term population trends; my point was that if it becomes a common occurrence (similarly powerful storms occurring on a regular/yearly basis) than we will likely see less people migrating to Houston and a resultingly slower population growth for the city. Whether or not those migrants will opt for Phoenix or wherever remains to be seen. I agree there won't be a mass exodus unless the city experiences a Katrina-like storm.
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Old 10-08-2017, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,635,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westbymidwest View Post
I don't think Harvey will significantly impact Houston's long term population trends; my point was that if it becomes a common occurrence (similarly powerful storms occurring on a regular/yearly basis) than we will likely see less people migrating to Houston and a resultingly slower population growth for the city. Whether or not those migrants will opt for Phoenix or wherever remains to be seen. I agree there won't be a mass exodus unless the city experiences a Katrina-like storm.
they'll probably look at Dallas or Austin first before Phoenix. Though we do get our fair share of Texans here, given that we are halfway between two mega states.

We don't see as many Houstonians (?) as Dallas people though I feel.
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Old 10-09-2017, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
5,616 posts, read 3,934,565 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
Harris County isn't exclusively Houston: the city corresponds to only a bit more than half the county's population.



And do you think that Phoenix can handle the massive population influxes it would take to catch up with Houston without any impact to the water situation?
I'm willing to guess that Houston will be almost fully destroyed by a hurricane long before PHX loses water.
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Old 10-13-2017, 06:44 AM
 
611 posts, read 435,238 times
Reputation: 671
I don't know what you mean by fully destroy.
There wasn't much actual wind damage from Harvey in the Houston area.
Looks like Harvey was the wettest rain event anywhere in the US.
Houston has its drainage problems that can be improved, however that much water anywhere is going to cause problems.

Hurricanes historically have not caused as much damage to Houston as you guys make it out to be. Last year on tax day and the year before on labor day Houston has regular rain events that caused just as much problems as hurricanes. What I am trying to say is Houston has more of a drainage problem than a hurricane one.
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Old 10-13-2017, 06:54 AM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,277,997 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIG CATS View Post
I'm willing to guess that Houston will be almost fully destroyed by a hurricane long before PHX loses water.
And I'm certain that you are 100% wrong in that assessment.
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