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Old 09-06-2018, 05:21 PM
 
73 posts, read 55,980 times
Reputation: 23

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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Dry heat is more bearable from what I hear. You can actually cool off in the shade, right?
Obviously without the sun on you.
But 105 dry heat is much worse than 90 with 60% humidity as the humidity protects your skin somewhat from the infrared rays which are reflected by the water droplets.Also protects the lungs.
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Old 09-06-2018, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Illinois
260 posts, read 115,687 times
Reputation: 297
Yes. Totally overrated.

Give me late September temps and Mid June levels of sunshine all year please.
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Old 09-07-2018, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,866 posts, read 7,817,078 times
Reputation: 9497
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Yes it can but generally speaking east Texas humidity doesn't get to me much - I have spent many decades of my life living up and down the East Coast and THAT is a humid region!
We all experience things differently. I grew up in Delaware, spent 26 years in Houston and moved to Philadelphia 7+ years ago. We moved back east for a handful of reasons, one being to escape the oppressive heat and humidity of Houston that lasts up to 6 long months. Yes, Philly can be quite sticky during heat waves. But these are waves, not entire seasons. And for the most part, even the sticky days in Philadelphia give way to comfortable evenings. Not so in Houston.

Just looked at forecasts. For the next 15 days, forecasts for Houston are highs in the mid- to upper-80s and lows in the mid- to low-70s. Here in Philly, the highs for the next 15 days center around the mid- to lower-70s with lows ranging from 71 to 59. Having deep experience in both regions, I can assure you the heat and humidity combo in Houston is orders of magnitude different from this area of the east coast. Thank goodness.


https://outflux.net/weather/noaa/ind...66%3BFORID%3A9
https://outflux.net/weather/noaa/ind...66%3BFORID%3A9
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Old 09-07-2018, 03:16 PM
 
29 posts, read 7,469 times
Reputation: 21
Not at all, I really love the change of scenery and temperature.
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Old 09-07-2018, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,031 posts, read 36,285,285 times
Reputation: 63734
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
We all experience things differently. I grew up in Delaware, spent 26 years in Houston and moved to Philadelphia 7+ years ago. We moved back east for a handful of reasons, one being to escape the oppressive heat and humidity of Houston that lasts up to 6 long months. Yes, Philly can be quite sticky during heat waves. But these are waves, not entire seasons. And for the most part, even the sticky days in Philadelphia give way to comfortable evenings. Not so in Houston.

Just looked at forecasts. For the next 15 days, forecasts for Houston are highs in the mid- to upper-80s and lows in the mid- to low-70s. Here in Philly, the highs for the next 15 days center around the mid- to lower-70s with lows ranging from 71 to 59. Having deep experience in both regions, I can assure you the heat and humidity combo in Houston is orders of magnitude different from this area of the east coast. Thank goodness.


https://outflux.net/weather/noaa/ind...66%3BFORID%3A9
https://outflux.net/weather/noaa/ind...66%3BFORID%3A9
I'm sure you're right but I wouldn't know - I don't live anywhere near Houston (at least 3 hours north of Houston). Houston is right on the Gulf of Mexico so it has a level of humidity and heat index that is unusual for the rest of Texas.
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Old 09-08-2018, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,866 posts, read 7,817,078 times
Reputation: 9497
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I'm sure you're right but I wouldn't know - I don't live anywhere near Houston (at least 3 hours north of Houston). Houston is right on the Gulf of Mexico so it has a level of humidity and heat index that is unusual for the rest of Texas.
I donít know northeast Texas well, but isnít Tyler the major metro there? This weather comparison between Philly and Tyler is full of facts: https://weatherspark.com/compare/y/9...d-Philadelphia.

About half-way down is a particularly interesting graph comparing each cityís chance of muggy conditions defined as Ēthe percentage of time that is muggy, oppressive, or miserable.Ē It shows the peak chance for muggy conditions in Philly clocks in at the around 57% in late July/early August. At this same time, there is a 90% likelihood of muggy conditions in Tyler. Additionally, there are only 3 to 4 weeks where there is a greater than 50% chance of muggy conditions in Philadelphia. In comparison, there are 4+ months in Tyler where there is a greater than 50% chance of mugginess.

Perhaps your memories of summers on the east coast (at least the northeast coast) have dimmed a bit with the passing of time.
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Old 09-08-2018, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Miami-Dade
396 posts, read 138,051 times
Reputation: 561
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
I donít know northeast Texas well, but isnít Tyler the major metro there? This weather comparison between Philly and Tyler is full of facts: https://weatherspark.com/compare/y/9...d-Philadelphia.

About half-way down is a particularly interesting graph comparing each cityís chance of muggy conditions defined as Ēthe percentage of time that is muggy, oppressive, or miserable.Ē It shows the peak chance for muggy conditions in Philly clocks in at the around 57% in late July/early August. At this same time, there is a 90% likelihood of muggy conditions in Tyler. Additionally, there are only 3 to 4 weeks where there is a greater than 50% chance of muggy conditions in Philadelphia. In comparison, there are 4+ months in Tyler where there is a greater than 50% chance of mugginess.

Perhaps your memories of summers on the east coast (at least the northeast coast) have dimmed a bit with the passing of time.
I think it's a given that East Texas would be a muggier place than the northeast coast, so perhaps by "humid" she simply meant moist. 70% relative humidity at 60 degrees isn't muggy at all, but it sure is at 90 degrees.
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Old 09-08-2018, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,031 posts, read 36,285,285 times
Reputation: 63734
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
I don’t know northeast Texas well, but isn’t Tyler the major metro there? This weather comparison between Philly and Tyler is full of facts: https://weatherspark.com/compare/y/9...d-Philadelphia.

About half-way down is a particularly interesting graph comparing each city’s chance of muggy conditions defined as ”the percentage of time that is muggy, oppressive, or miserable.” It shows the peak chance for muggy conditions in Philly clocks in at the around 57% in late July/early August. At this same time, there is a 90% likelihood of muggy conditions in Tyler. Additionally, there are only 3 to 4 weeks where there is a greater than 50% chance of muggy conditions in Philadelphia. In comparison, there are 4+ months in Tyler where there is a greater than 50% chance of mugginess.

Perhaps your memories of summers on the east coast (at least the northeast coast) have dimmed a bit with the passing of time.
I never lived in Philly, or anywhere in PA for that matter. I lived in Virginia Beach, and in Aberdeen, MD - right on the coast of the Chesapeake Bay, as well as near the NC and SC coasts.

What you're calling "miserable" (or what that site calls "miserable" - or both) is subjective. I don't consider humidity levels of 50 or so percent to be "miserable." In fact, to me that feels pretty dang good. And my skin loves it.

Last edited by KathrynAragon; 09-08-2018 at 12:53 PM..
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Old 09-08-2018, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,031 posts, read 36,285,285 times
Reputation: 63734
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
I donít know northeast Texas well, but isnít Tyler the major metro there? This weather comparison between Philly and Tyler is full of facts: https://weatherspark.com/compare/y/9...d-Philadelphia.

About half-way down is a particularly interesting graph comparing each cityís chance of muggy conditions defined as Ēthe percentage of time that is muggy, oppressive, or miserable.Ē It shows the peak chance for muggy conditions in Philly clocks in at the around 57% in late July/early August. At this same time, there is a 90% likelihood of muggy conditions in Tyler. Additionally, there are only 3 to 4 weeks where there is a greater than 50% chance of muggy conditions in Philadelphia. In comparison, there are 4+ months in Tyler where there is a greater than 50% chance of mugginess.

Perhaps your memories of summers on the east coast (at least the northeast coast) have dimmed a bit with the passing of time.
But since I was comparing HOUSTON TX to NE (Yes, Tyler) TX - using your site, here's the difference - yep, it's definitely muggier and rainier in Houston than it is in Tyler - not that I didn't already know that.

Like I said, Houston is over 3 hours south of Tyler and right on the gulf coast. Significantly different weather patterns, even though we're in the same (very large) state.

Philadelphia PA and Oneonta NY are about the same distance apart as Tyler and Houston and guess what - they don't have the same weather patterns either. What the...!
https://weatherspark.com/compare/y/2...ia-and-Oneonta
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Old 09-08-2018, 02:48 PM
 
Location: lake charles
97 posts, read 33,063 times
Reputation: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
But since I was comparing HOUSTON TX to NE (Yes, Tyler) TX - using your site, here's the difference - yep, it's definitely muggier and rainier in Houston than it is in Tyler - not that I didn't already know that.

Like I said, Houston is over 3 hours south of Tyler and right on the gulf coast. Significantly different weather patterns, even though we're in the same (very large) state.

Philadelphia PA and Oneonta NY are about the same distance apart as Tyler and Houston and guess what - they don't have the same weather patterns either. What the...!
https://weatherspark.com/compare/y/2...ia-and-Oneonta
did you even read a single word of pines post? lol.
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