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Old 09-09-2018, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,840 posts, read 36,186,607 times
Reputation: 63499

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frustratedintelligence View Post
Right...?
All I can tell you is that right now, in NE Texas, outside it's 91 percent humidity with a dew point of 69 degrees and it feels great to me. Not "oppressive," and certainly not "miserable." And yet according to that oh so scientific chart, I should be miserable out there.

I'm not some weird outlier - it's just not miserable outside to me. I guess it might be to someone else, but the term is clearly subjective. For instance, I am "miserable" when there's still snow on the ground in April, or when I have to shovel snow (again) in March, or when I'm at the beach in late May and have to wear a jacket and the water is still 52 degrees - but I wouldn't claim that as some sort of scientific evidence that some place is miserable in general - apparently some other people like it or at least don't mind it and so good on them.
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Old 09-09-2018, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Miami-Dade
396 posts, read 137,156 times
Reputation: 561
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
All I can tell you is that right now, in NE Texas, outside it's 91 percent humidity with a dew point of 69 degrees and it feels great to me. Not "oppressive," and certainly not "miserable." And yet according to that oh so scientific chart, I should be miserable out there.
Agreed but that's not what the initial disagreement was about.
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Old 09-09-2018, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,859 posts, read 7,804,484 times
Reputation: 9483
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I've lived above the Mason Dixon line - just not on the coast.
Really? Which of these states are above the MDL?
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Let's see - I've lived in (in order):

Louisiana
Texas
California
Tennessee
Japan
Ohio
Virginia
North Carolina
Alabama
Georgia
Maryland
Texas again
South Carolina
Maryland again
Germany
Texas again

Last edited by Pine to Vine; 09-09-2018 at 09:14 AM..
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Old 09-09-2018, 08:57 AM
 
329 posts, read 202,147 times
Reputation: 579
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
All I can tell you is that right now, in NE Texas, outside it's 91 percent humidity with a dew point of 69 degrees and it feels great to me. Not "oppressive," and certainly not "miserable." And yet according to that oh so scientific chart, I should be miserable out there.

I'm not some weird outlier - it's just not miserable outside to me. I guess it might be to someone else, but the term is clearly subjective. For instance, I am "miserable" when there's still snow on the ground in April, or when I have to shovel snow (again) in March, or when I'm at the beach in late May and have to wear a jacket and the water is still 52 degrees - but I wouldn't claim that as some sort of scientific evidence that some place is miserable in general - apparently some other people like it or at least don't mind it and so good on them.
It's about the same here but raining. Temp is only 74. Feels very humid, little bit too sticky to me, but not miserable. My glasses fog up immediately when I go outside so it's pretty thick out there. Miserable and oppressive will be the temp goes back up and the sun appears again later this week!
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Old 09-09-2018, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,859 posts, read 7,804,484 times
Reputation: 9483
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frustratedintelligence View Post
Agreed but that's not what the initial disagreement was about.
Exactly. The disagreement started with this:
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I have spent many decades of my life living up and down the East Coast and THAT is a humid region!
There are two parts to that particular post that invite challenge:

1. Despite KA’s ever shifting list of places she has lived and the amount of time she has lived in each, they hardly qualify as being “up and down the East Coast,” as most people would define it.

2. What drew me to actually make comment, however, was her claim of the intensity of humidity levels of the East Coast. Yes, the northeast coast does have occasional heat waves (defined here as being 3 consecutive days with highs above 90 degrees). But no one with even a 5th grade understanding of weather would believe that a place like Philadelphia would experience periods of humidity anywhere near those of a place like Tyler, Texas. And the number of days with hot and oppressive weather grow fewer and fewer as one travels further up the East Coast to the upper stretches of New England.

I’ve referenced not only my own experience of living in different parts of the country and more importantly, provided empirical evidence that proves the initial statement made by KA is untrue. She in turn has tried to change the topic, providing such non sequiturs, for example as referencing her personal comfort with more humid conditions, as if that any bearing on the matter.

There is nothing more I can add that will prove the falsity of the original claim. It is totally debunked. Given the poster in question has demonstated a general insistence on having the last word, on this particular matter, I invite her to be my guest.
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Old 09-09-2018, 09:19 AM
 
329 posts, read 202,147 times
Reputation: 579
[quote=KathrynAragon;53036388]All I can tell you is that right now, in NE Texas, outside it's 91 percent humidity with a dew point of 69 degrees and it feels great to me. Not "oppressive," and certainly not "miserable." And yet according to that oh so scientific chart, I should be miserable out there.

I'm not some weird outlier - it's just not miserable outside to me. I guess it might be to someone else, but the term is clearly subjective.

It's really not so different up in the NE, like Philly, for short periods of time or waves, like Pine noted. You said earlier it was SO humid up and down the East coast but 91 percent humidity and 69 degree dewpoint feels great?
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Old 09-09-2018, 12:32 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,137 posts, read 9,909,375 times
Reputation: 6424
Default Are "change of seasons" overrated? (to buy, living in)

Quote:
Originally Posted by tman7117 View Post
Not to say that it's wrong to like a change of seasons, but I personally don't see why people like it so much.
Living in the New York metro area, an area that gets 4 very distinct seasons, I can't stand it. Especially the change from summer to fall when it's that awkward point in late September/October and you don't know what to where because it's 40 degrees in the morning and 75 by 1 in the afternoon. Don't even get me started on winter. I'd rather have a year long summer/warm climate like So.Cal or Texas/Florida

Anyone else feel this way?
Actually, I was just thinking this the other day. Far from being overrated like you said, I would say that the change of seasons is UNDERRATED.

Here in the Northeast people sometimes leave because of the cost of living and generally move south. I am now thinking that people should also consider parts of the Midwest. Perhaps states like Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Indiana, Minnesota, Missouri and Iowa.
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Old 09-09-2018, 01:41 PM
 
1,900 posts, read 830,551 times
Reputation: 1610
Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Actually, I was just thinking this the other day. Far from being overrated like you said, I would say that the change of seasons is UNDERRATED.

Here in the Northeast people sometimes leave because of the cost of living and generally move south. I am now thinking that people should also consider parts of the Midwest. Perhaps states like Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Indiana, Minnesota, Missouri and Iowa.

Agreed. Change of season and having more than 2 distinct seasons truly is underrated IMHO as well.
I live in Texas and have no complaints whatsoever, well except perhaps the seasons. There really are only 2 here, or at least in the big urban areas of Houston, SA, Austin and Dallas, I left El Paso out because I have not been there.
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Old 09-09-2018, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,840 posts, read 36,186,607 times
Reputation: 63499
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tams here View Post
It's about the same here but raining. Temp is only 74. Feels very humid, little bit too sticky to me, but not miserable. My glasses fog up immediately when I go outside so it's pretty thick out there. Miserable and oppressive will be the temp goes back up and the sun appears again later this week!
Hey, here in NE Texas we've got a great week's forecast ahead of us - highs in the 70s and a few 80s, lows in the 60s, some scattered rain but not torrential rain - sweet.

The humidity right now is 72 percent - pretty typical for an overcast day. Temps in the mid 70s. To me, it feels great outside!
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Old 09-09-2018, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,840 posts, read 36,186,607 times
Reputation: 63499
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
Exactly. The disagreement started with this:

There are two parts to that particular post that invite challenge:

1. Despite KA’s ever shifting list of places she has lived and the amount of time she has lived in each, they hardly qualify as being “up and down the East Coast,” as most people would define it.

2. What drew me to actually make comment, however, was her claim of the intensity of humidity levels of the East Coast. Yes, the northeast coast does have occasional heat waves (defined here as being 3 consecutive days with highs above 90 degrees). But no one with even a 5th grade understanding of weather would believe that a place like Philadelphia would experience periods of humidity anywhere near those of a place like Tyler, Texas. And the number of days with hot and oppressive weather grow fewer and fewer as one travels further up the East Coast to the upper stretches of New England.

I’ve referenced not only my own experience of living in different parts of the country and more importantly, provided empirical evidence that proves the initial statement made by KA is untrue. She in turn has tried to change the topic, providing such non sequiturs, for example as referencing her personal comfort with more humid conditions, as if that any bearing on the matter.

There is nothing more I can add that will prove the falsity of the original claim. It is totally debunked. Given the poster in question has demonstated a general insistence on having the last word, on this particular matter, I invite her to be my guest.
Oh please.

I don't have an "ever shifting list of places I've lived and the amount of time I've lived in each." I've lived in five states along the east coast, and visited (repeatedly just for the record) more. And that's not including several other countries, and states that aren't along the east coast.

I never claimed that "places like Philadelphia" experience periods of humidity anywhere near those of a place like Tyler, Texas. That being said, the entire east coast has periods of sometimes uncomfortable humidity. So does Tyler, Texas. If you want to say that that's my "claim that they experience similar humidity" then go for it, but it seems pretty clear to me that what I was saying was that the East Coast can be quite humid at times - I know, I've experienced it, and will almost certainly experience it again.

The rest is just conversation - mostly about how subjective any website is that claims that high humidity is "miserable." Maybe it is, maybe it isn't - but it's subjective rhetoric, not scientific fact. Some people prefer low humidity and others don't - personally I like humidity to be pretty high - maybe because I'm used to it, hell, I was born in New Orleans so just about anywhere in the US has lower humidity than that! Anyway, just because I'm engaging in conversation about subjective rhetoric and giving my own feedback doesn't mean I'm trying to change any topic or that I think you've "debunked the falsity of the original claim" (whatever that is) - it just means I'm remarking on, well, four seasons, "acceptable humidity levels," personal experiences living in and traveling about various regions of the country, etc etc.

But please - don't let me stop you from arguing and trying to prove me wrong for whatever reason you might have.

Hey, did you know that Rochester, NY made the top ten cities for high humidity in the US? Isn't NY an East Coast state? Last time I checked, it was.
https://www.currentresults.com/Weath...mid-cities.php

And here are the average summer humidities for states along the east coast - including the fives east coast states I've lived in and the others that I haven't lived in:
Connecticut - morning 86 percent, afternoon 52 percent
Delaware - 85, 55
Florida - 89, 63
Georgia - 91, 54
Maine - 90, 63
Maryland - 84, 53
Massachusetts - 81, 69
New Hampshire - 91, 52
New Jersey - 89, 59
New York - 87, 56
North Carolina - 90, 57
Pennsylvania - 84, 54
Philadelphia specifically since it seems to be a hot button for some people - 76, 54
https://www.currentresults.com/Weath...ity-annual.php
Rhode Island - 85, 58
South Carolina - 91, 54
Vermont - 79, 54

(Just for the heck of it - since so many people are comparing NE Texas humidity to East Coast humidity - or rather, saying it doesn't compare): Dallas, TX - 82, 44
https://www.currentresults.com/Weath...-in-summer.php
Which interestingly enough, is below the average morning and afternoon humidity levels of nearly all the east coast states, both north and south.


By the way, how bout if you post where I've made a "shifting list of places I've lived and the amount of time I've lived in each." Don't make a claim you can't back up, especially when it involves whether or not someone is telling the truth.

Last edited by KathrynAragon; 09-09-2018 at 02:45 PM..
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