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Old 02-12-2019, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,884 posts, read 36,220,301 times
Reputation: 63553

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Good gravy. Just got back from a long weekend in Ohio, and I do mean LONG. Freezing rain, sleet, snow, wind...OH MY GOSH. Big piles of dirty old snow in parking lots, wet and freezing cold all at the same time.

When we got back to NE Texas, yes, it was still wet, and still chilly yesterday - but still about 35 degrees warmer, with no sleet or ice or snow to deal with. Today was a crisp sunny 50 degrees and let me tell you, I was glad to be out of that freezing mess.

Still - it was good to see family. So there's that!
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Old 02-13-2019, 05:56 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon (in Transition)
888 posts, read 442,479 times
Reputation: 1465
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Good gravy. Just got back from a long weekend in Ohio, and I do mean LONG. Freezing rain, sleet, snow, wind...OH MY GOSH. Big piles of dirty old snow in parking lots, wet and freezing cold all at the same time.

When we got back to NE Texas, yes, it was still wet, and still chilly yesterday - but still about 35 degrees warmer, with no sleet or ice or snow to deal with. Today was a crisp sunny 50 degrees and let me tell you, I was glad to be out of that freezing mess.

Still - it was good to see family. So there's that!
I never liked Ohio in winter when I had to travel. It is just south enough that much of the state freaks out and north enough to see appreciable amounts of snow and ice.

One time during work standby, I went for a walk in downtown Marietta and the town was dead. It had only snowed maybe 2-3 inches, but people hunkered down like it was the end of the world. I would expect as much for somewhere in the South, but not Ohio.
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Old 02-13-2019, 06:46 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,884 posts, read 36,220,301 times
Reputation: 63553
Quote:
Originally Posted by cornsnicker3 View Post
I never liked Ohio in winter when I had to travel. It is just south enough that much of the state freaks out and north enough to see appreciable amounts of snow and ice.

One time during work standby, I went for a walk in downtown Marietta and the town was dead. It had only snowed maybe 2-3 inches, but people hunkered down like it was the end of the world. I would expect as much for somewhere in the South, but not Ohio.
Oh that hasn't been my experience with it - people were out and about everywhere. Just bundled up and miserable (we were too). Everyone I know from Ohio is very used to, I mean resigned to, miserable winters.

Which brings me to another point - having to wear a coat, scarves, gloves and hats just about everywhere. Then you get inside an establishment and what do you do with all this paraphernalia? You take it off, lug it around, etc. We went to the USAF Museum one day while we were there and it was incredibly hot and stuffy throughout the entire thing.

It was also hot and stuffy in several restaurants. So then you have all this hot, heavy stuff to take off, keep tabs on, etc. Then you put all those layers and stuff back on to go back outside. Goodness - that's just not for me.

That's no better than southerners cranking up the AC so high in the summer that you're cold when you're inside a restaurant.
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Old 02-14-2019, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,857 posts, read 2,991,404 times
Reputation: 3399
With a jacket on in Denver, 40 degrees feels balmy to me.

Speaking of balmy, high in the mid 80s across much of Central Texas tomorrow!!
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Old 02-14-2019, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Illinois
260 posts, read 115,068 times
Reputation: 297
I'm living in a town about 40 degree north this year. Furthest north I've ever lived. It sucks. Haven't been able to do anything outside since Thanksgiving.

Have probably another month of this weather left.

Its wholly depressing and awful. Weather is frequently 20 degrees warmer 3 hours south of here.
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Old 02-14-2019, 08:11 AM
 
9,519 posts, read 13,457,526 times
Reputation: 5695
Quote:
Originally Posted by FalstaffBlues View Post
I'm living in a town about 40 degree north this year. Furthest north I've ever lived. It sucks. Haven't been able to do anything outside since Thanksgiving.

Have probably another month of this weather left.

Its wholly depressing and awful. Weather is frequently 20 degrees warmer 3 hours south of here.
If that's the case, you aren't living in a good place. You think the cold stops people in New York City? People are out running, biking, playing sports because there's a ton to do and it's a lively city.
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Old 02-14-2019, 08:30 AM
 
6,972 posts, read 14,102,736 times
Reputation: 4553
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Oh that hasn't been my experience with it - people were out and about everywhere. Just bundled up and miserable (we were too). Everyone I know from Ohio is very used to, I mean resigned to, miserable winters.

Which brings me to another point - having to wear a coat, scarves, gloves and hats just about everywhere. Then you get inside an establishment and what do you do with all this paraphernalia? You take it off, lug it around, etc. We went to the USAF Museum one day while we were there and it was incredibly hot and stuffy throughout the entire thing.

It was also hot and stuffy in several restaurants. So then you have all this hot, heavy stuff to take off, keep tabs on, etc. Then you put all those layers and stuff back on to go back outside. Goodness - that's just not for me.

That's no better than southerners cranking up the AC so high in the summer that you're cold when you're inside a restaurant.
I never understood this about people in the suburbs. You leave your heated house to get into your car which will have the heat blasting and you drive to the store/restaurant you're going to which will be heated once you get inside. Why do people insist on throwing on 3 layers, a hat, a scarf and gloves when they're only outside for a maximum of 2 minutes while walking into the establishment? Also, why do people drive their car while wearing all those layers at once? You know the car has heat, right?

In NYC, most of my friends and I don't layer. We wear one heavy-ish coat. The walk to the subway might be cold, but the station will be at least somewhat warm. The train will be warm. The walk to wherever might be cold. But then when we get to the bar/restaurant, we don't have to take off 7 things and watch out for them the entire night. Why do suburban people insist on wearing more layers than some New Yorkers when we're exposed to the cold even longer since we actually walk places? I wear T-shirts under most of my winter coats because I know when I get inside, the heat will be cranking. A lot of my friends do the same.
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Old 02-14-2019, 08:40 AM
 
6,972 posts, read 14,102,736 times
Reputation: 4553
Quote:
Originally Posted by FalstaffBlues View Post
I'm living in a town about 40 degree north this year. Furthest north I've ever lived. It sucks. Haven't been able to do anything outside since Thanksgiving.

Have probably another month of this weather left.

Its wholly depressing and awful. Weather is frequently 20 degrees warmer 3 hours south of here.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdawg8181 View Post
If that's the case, you aren't living in a good place. You think the cold stops people in New York City? People are out running, biking, playing sports because there's a ton to do and it's a lively city.
This. People act like anyone who goes through winter legitimately sits inside their house and does nothing for months on end. We're not depressed and we don't just do nothing for months on end. If that was the case, why are Scandinavian countries the happiest countries? And Canada is pretty high up on the happiness as well. They all get longer/worse winters than most of the US, but they do stuff that makes them happy in winter. Pick up a winter sport. Or embrace the beauty of snow. I don't see how it's any different than people in the coastal Southeast or Desert SW having to stay inside for months on end in the summer because it's too hot to breathe outside.

I moved from LA to NYC. I love the change of seasons. Summers are hot, but we take full advantage of them. We go to the shore, only frequent bars/restaurants with outdoor patios and rooftops. Have picnics in the parks. Do whatever you can think of outdoors. Fall leaves are pretty, but I honestly am not a huge fan of Fall. Winter is beautiful because I live somewhere that doesn't close down in winter. The city honestly comes quite alive. The lights and decorations everywhere, people visiting from all over the world, the winter markets and holiday events all over the city. There isn't much prettier than seeing a brownstone's steps covered in snow and the lights/wreaths wrapped up the handrail and over the doors/windows. My friends and I go to more restaurants that have indoor seating and serve heavier meals that we'd never think of eating in summer. We do indoor beer gardens that have heated and covered areas. We spend time cooking with each other. And even though winter is beautiful and can be fun in a different way, there's not much else that feels as great as that first warm day of Spring when you know it's finally warming up for good. The outdoor dining tables come back out. The rooftop bars reopen. The greenery comes back to the trees and the parks and feeling warm again is a really nice feeling.

TBH, those changes are amazing to me. Constantly experiencing the same weather gets really boring IMO. I mean yeah, you can do more outdoorsy stuff I guess. But to me it's a very stagnant life where nothing really ever changes. I get bored very easily I think, so having different seasons breaks up the year and makes time actually seem moving. It also forces my friends and I to take advantage of different seasonal activities and I do more here than I did in LA because I always figured "oh I can do that another time" in LA and I never ended up doing it.
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Old 02-14-2019, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,857 posts, read 2,991,404 times
Reputation: 3399
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
This. People act like anyone who goes through winter legitimately sits inside their house and does nothing for months on end. We're not depressed and we don't just do nothing for months on end. If that was the case, why are Scandinavian countries the happiest countries? And Canada is pretty high up on the happiness as well. They all get longer/worse winters than most of the US, but they do stuff that makes them happy in winter. Pick up a winter sport. Or embrace the beauty of snow. I don't see how it's any different than people in the coastal Southeast or Desert SW having to stay inside for months on end in the summer because it's too hot to breathe outside.

I moved from LA to NYC. I love the change of seasons. Summers are hot, but we take full advantage of them. We go to the shore, only frequent bars/restaurants with outdoor patios and rooftops. Have picnics in the parks. Do whatever you can think of outdoors. Fall leaves are pretty, but I honestly am not a huge fan of Fall. Winter is beautiful because I live somewhere that doesn't close down in winter. The city honestly comes quite alive. The lights and decorations everywhere, people visiting from all over the world, the winter markets and holiday events all over the city. There isn't much prettier than seeing a brownstone's steps covered in snow and the lights/wreaths wrapped up the handrail and over the doors/windows. My friends and I go to more restaurants that have indoor seating and serve heavier meals that we'd never think of eating in summer. We do indoor beer gardens that have heated and covered areas. We spend time cooking with each other. And even though winter is beautiful and can be fun in a different way, there's not much else that feels as great as that first warm day of Spring when you know it's finally warming up for good. The outdoor dining tables come back out. The rooftop bars reopen. The greenery comes back to the trees and the parks and feeling warm again is a really nice feeling.

TBH, those changes are amazing to me. Constantly experiencing the same weather gets really boring IMO. I mean yeah, you can do more outdoorsy stuff I guess. But to me it's a very stagnant life where nothing really ever changes. I get bored very easily I think, so having different seasons breaks up the year and makes time actually seem moving. It also forces my friends and I to take advantage of different seasonal activities and I do more here than I did in LA because I always figured "oh I can do that another time" in LA and I never ended up doing it.
I love fall, almost anywhere. It's just a great transition from a normally brutal summer. Generally a fan of snow as well. There's a peaceful quality to it. Spring and summer don't do it for me.

I'm considering LA for my next locale but am worried about the boring weather, though I know skiing is a reasonable drive away.
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Old 02-14-2019, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Illinois
260 posts, read 115,068 times
Reputation: 297
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdawg8181 View Post
If that's the case, you aren't living in a good place. You think the cold stops people in New York City? People are out running, biking, playing sports because there's a ton to do and it's a lively city.
NYC is 1.) Not nearly as cold as the midwest and 2.) Does not experience near the wind chill factor.

Nice try though.

I don't sit inside my house doing nothing.

What am i supposed to do outside? Look at empty corn and bean fields?

Winter is bad for you. Plain and simple. Proven over and over by the data.
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