U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 10-10-2017, 05:12 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,856,300 times
Reputation: 5855

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
A feeling of lack tends to become amplified when the object in question is so close yet so far from attainment. That is the situation with much of the South outside S FL when it comes to coconuts and other tender tropicals: so many of these plants would otherwise be growing profusely through the region, but can't, as even a single 32F/0C can kill them. A region right across the sea from North Africa shouldn't be dealing which such cold.

So many QOL issues of the region would be made easier to solve if the climate were such that these plants could grow:
  • For one, many of these tropical fruits contain great health benefits, which go a long way in preventing ailments like obesity, diabetes, etc that the region has (especially in the poor/rural areas hit the hardest). The potential increase in disease vectors like mosquitoes from the warmer winters would be counteracted by the increased winter dry-season to help limit standing water (since no cold fronts come down to draw up rains from the Gulf); not to mention, there will be even greater variety of bats and other insectivores that keep bug populations in check (since they can range in from the tropics).

  • It also would single-handedly eliminate all disasters in the region except hurricanes and floods. Ice storms, catastrophic tornadoes, hail, etc as seen in places inland in the region would become a thing of the past, because elimination of cold fronts means elimination pf the dynamics that bring such weather ailments.

  • The Southern wilderness gets to be even more bio-diverse than it already is (and also more exotic). Imagine the tropical mangroves of Florida growing in the swamps of Louisiana? Or boa constrictors and spider monkeys deep in the heart of Texas?

It can also be argued that real estate in places like S FL, and SoCal wouldn't be near as expensive, as there would be more land of warm winter weather spread around for the snowbirds to flock to. So less over-the-top condo developments in S FL that create income inequality, and limit the amount of untouched beach.

Essentially, the cold fronts limit the South from reaching its full potential, like making a A- when it could have been an A+. Elimination of those cold fronts can be the one good thing that comes out of anthropogenic global warming.
If you want coconut palms so bad, why don't you move to where they are? Miami/Ft Lauderdale would be a much better choice than Houston/Galveston. Better to go where what you want is than hope for something that will never happen, why I left NY
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-10-2017, 05:18 AM
 
377 posts, read 202,011 times
Reputation: 349
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
A feeling of lack tends to become amplified when the object in question is so close yet so far from attainment. That is the situation with much of the South outside S FL when it comes to coconuts and other tender tropicals: so many of these plants would otherwise be growing profusely through the region, but can't, as even a single 32F/0C can kill them. A region right across the sea from North Africa shouldn't be dealing which such cold.

So many QOL issues of the region would be made easier to solve if the climate were such that these plants could grow:
  • For one, many of these tropical fruits contain great health benefits, which go a long way in preventing ailments like obesity, diabetes, etc that the region has (especially in the poor/rural areas hit the hardest). The potential increase in disease vectors like mosquitoes from the warmer winters would be counteracted by the increased winter dry-season to help limit standing water (since no cold fronts come down to draw up rains from the Gulf); not to mention, there will be even greater variety of bats and other insectivores that keep bug populations in check (since they can range in from the tropics).

  • It also would single-handedly eliminate all disasters in the region except hurricanes and floods. Ice storms, catastrophic tornadoes, hail, etc as seen in places inland in the region would become a thing of the past, because elimination of cold fronts means elimination pf the dynamics that bring such weather ailments.

  • The Southern wilderness gets to be even more bio-diverse than it already is (and also more exotic). Imagine the tropical mangroves of Florida growing in the swamps of Louisiana? Or boa constrictors and spider monkeys deep in the heart of Texas?

It can also be argued that real estate in places like S FL, and SoCal wouldn't be near as expensive, as there would be more land of warm winter weather spread around for the snowbirds to flock to. So less over-the-top condo developments in S FL that create income inequality, and limit the amount of untouched beach.

Essentially, the cold fronts limit the South from reaching its full potential, like making a A- when it could have been an A+. Elimination of those cold fronts can be the one good thing that comes out of anthropogenic global warming.
It's not just cold snaps that kill coconut palms, but also the average temperature in the winter needs to be high enough.

Case in point, Bermuda. The record cold temperature of Bermuda 44F, and while they can grow coconut palms, the trees don't fruit. It's just too cold their in the winter.

So bottom line, eliminate cold fronts and there wouldn't be fruiting coconuts in Galveston or Jacksonville either.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2017, 05:43 AM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,278,751 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
If you want coconut palms so bad, why don't you move to where they are? Miami/Ft Lauderdale would be a much better choice than Houston/Galveston. Better to go where what you want is than hope for something that will never happen, why I left NY
South FL is one of many places I'm looking at regarding job prospects after graduate school. Thank you for asking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
It's not just cold snaps that kill coconut palms, but also the average temperature in the winter needs to be high enough.

Case in point, Bermuda. The record cold temperature of Bermuda 44F, and while they can grow coconut palms, the trees don't fruit. It's just too cold their in the winter.

So bottom line, eliminate cold fronts and there wouldn't be fruiting coconuts in Galveston or Jacksonville either.
In earlier posts of this thread, I've shown that areas like Galveston and Jacksonville would well clear those average temp requirements (i.e 60.8F/16C) if cold snaps were eliminated. Reason being that the torrid Gulf of Mexico, which sends many days of winter lows at/above 60F, would then have more control over the climate. Winter averages for those cities would obviously go up:
Are "change of seasons" overrated?
Are "change of seasons" overrated?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2017, 06:22 AM
 
377 posts, read 202,011 times
Reputation: 349
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post

In earlier posts of this thread, I've shown that areas like Galveston and Jacksonville would well clear those average temp requirements (i.e 60.8F/16C)
Bermuda averages 64 (daily mean) during her coldest month. The coldest temperature recorded is 44F. The tree's still don't fruit.

Also both Galveston and Jacksonville are currently a long way from a daily mean of 60F. Galveston has a daily mean of just 55F in January. The average high (not daily mean) is 61F. You think eliminating cold snaps will bring up the daily mean by 5 degrees? I doubt it, but even if you do the situation will be similar to Bermuda, coconut palms without the coconuts.

Last edited by SpringSnow; 10-10-2017 at 06:32 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2017, 07:11 AM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,278,751 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
Bermuda averages 64 (daily mean) during her coldest month. The coldest temperature recorded is 44F. The tree's still don't fruit.
You sure about that? This thread suggests otherwise:
Which is more tropical: Miami or Bermuda

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
Galveston has a daily mean of just 55F in January. The average high (not daily mean) is 61F. You think eliminating cold snaps will bring up the daily mean by 5 degrees?
Galveston also averages 16 days of lows at or above 60F during the three winter months. And when do those lows occur? In the lulls between cold snaps, when the Gulf has full control of the weather. Thus, its pretty clear that winter lows would almost always be 60F+ if Gulf flow was never interrupted by cold snaps; perhaps some occasional nights in the 50s and upper 40s.

Same for other areas of the coastal South. Much of the region has lower latitudes than Bermuda, and so features lesser issues regarding winter daylight. On top of that, many of these coastal South cities have average annual extreme winter maximums that match Bermuda's winter record highs, and see faster warm-ups going into spring and summer. Thus, any issues that Bermuda has won't be as present in a warmer coastal South:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Houston#Climate
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Orleans#Climate
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackso...lorida#Climate
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bermuda#Climate
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2017, 07:16 AM
 
377 posts, read 202,011 times
Reputation: 349
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
You sure about that?
Yes, I'm sure about. You can stop fascinating about coconut palms now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2017, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Lil Rhodey
679 posts, read 463,504 times
Reputation: 938
Still waiting for the season to change here ... It's October but feeling like August
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2017, 07:33 AM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,278,751 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
Yes, I'm sure about. You can stop fascinating about coconut palms now.
Nope. Check the thread again, clear evidence that coconuts fruit in Bermuda. A thread in PalmTalk confirms that fact:
Winter in Bermuda - DISCUSSING PALM TREES WORLDWIDE - PalmTalk
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2017, 07:37 AM
 
377 posts, read 202,011 times
Reputation: 349
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
Nope. Check the thread again, clear evidence that coconuts fruit in Bermuda. A thread in PalmTalk confirms that fact:
Winter in Bermuda - DISCUSSING PALM TREES WORLDWIDE - PalmTalk
They do not fruit Bermuda, 1 or two fruiting coconut palms under doted conditions notwithstanding. This is common knowledge for anyone whose been to Bermuda. Please post a pic of Coconut palms fruiting in Bermuda in the wild (not next to someone's house).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2017, 07:59 AM
 
6,483 posts, read 4,069,179 times
Reputation: 16747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
[*]For one, many of these tropical fruits contain great health benefits, which go a long way in preventing ailments like obesity, diabetes, etc that the region has
Coconuts and other tropical fruits prevent obesity? How's that working out in the coconut-growing islands?

Most obese countries in the world:

1. Palau
2. Nauru
3. Marshall Islands
4. Samoa
5. Tonga
7. Kiribati
8. Tuvalu

29 Most Obese Countries In The World - WorldAtlas.com
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top