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Old 02-19-2019, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,072 posts, read 3,399,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Sorry, but I'd be happy to send you the very typical photos of February budding if you like. I have lived here nearly 30 years - I can assure you it's typical. Been doing this as long as I can remember around here. Oh my gosh, I can't believe it but yes, I'm going outside right now to take some photos. I can also probably find photos from last year's February as well, and the year before that and the year before that too, because I always love the early signs of early spring in Texas, but frankly I'm too lazy to look those up - but I'll post some photos just from my yard, this year, just for you! By the way, it's not concerning, because it's typical. It's also typical for there to be a frost in March and for it to occasionally, but not always, effect the earliest blooms.

I said things were budding in my yard, not blooming, though I do have a few things that always bloom this time of year or earlier - the camellias for instance, which are now done blooming (they usually bloom in January). Back in a minute!



Other parts of the South, not necessarily Tyler, TX, are experiencing full on blooming a month in advance. And no, mid February is not typical for the zone that north Texas is in. There's a difference between LATE February, which yes I have seen, and mid-February. If a frost returns and trees are even budding, it can cause some damage. The average temperatures in North Texas this time of year are too cool for the trees to re-bud. This seems to be a warmer one, just like 2017 was. 2017 (and 2016) there was early budding but it still was later in the month than the middle. But hey maybe its more common than I realise. But still too early. That'd be the equivalent of us losing our leaves in August. Something is wrong if thats happening lol.
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Old 02-19-2019, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,072 posts, read 3,399,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
OK I guess you will just have to trust me to some extent but here are some photos I just took in my yard (along with the time stamp from one of them). Herbs that have made it or come back, daylilies, grasses, Easter lilies coming up, rosebushes budding, ajuga coming back (as usual), a camellia (a few are still blooming), some sort of flower that always blooms this time of year, that I cut and brought inside since they tend to last longer in a vase than camellias, etc. This is very typical for this time of year, and has been for decades.

It will almost certainly freeze again but this stuff will make it, like it does every year.

There is some sort of blooming tree all out in the woods too, with a white bloom, not a dogwood or redbud - something else, I can't remember what it's called. We don't have any in our yard. Some trees are budding out but so far not in our yard - we have cyprus and oak and crepe myrtles mostly, with a few other species thrown in, but so far they're all still bare.

Texas is a big state, with many different types of weather. Here is typical February weather for my area. Note that the average highs are in the low 60s and average lows are in the 40s in February.

Also, contrary to some concepts, the average high is 94 and average low is 71 in August. Some people seem to think it's 100 degrees or higher for two or three months out of the year here.
https://www.usclimatedata.com/climat...tates/ustx1383



Yea thats how it looked around early March in the parts of Texas I lived and spent spring in. Not February. Only thing I noticed really blooming in February would be bradford pears, but like I said, this would be later in the month like in the last week.


I love spring, but February is too early for me. I still wanna enjoy the rest of winter, haha. Hopefully those flowers do fine and they don't get ruined by a frost.



Btw I just compared, and Denton (where I spent 2/3 of my Texas springs) has an average low in the 30s in February, as opposed to Tyler with an average low in the 40s. Maybe those few degrees is all it takes to make the flowers return sooner or later. I know February up there was generally too cold to have all that return so early. Its crazy how different than is despite Tyler not being that far south in comparison.
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Old 02-19-2019, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
Great looking garden.


94 is scorching to some of us.
Thank you!

I don't really feel hot - and then it's still bearable - till it's over 95. Yes, even with humidity. Now - anything over that and I'm thinking "Whew! Get me some AC!" Probably about as often as some people scrape snow or ice off their cars.
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Old 02-19-2019, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Other parts of the South, not necessarily Tyler, TX, are experiencing full on blooming a month in advance. And no, mid February is not typical for the zone that north Texas is in. There's a difference between LATE February, which yes I have seen, and mid-February. If a frost returns and trees are even budding, it can cause some damage. The average temperatures in North Texas this time of year are too cool for the trees to re-bud. This seems to be a warmer one, just like 2017 was. 2017 (and 2016) there was early budding but it still was later in the month than the middle. But hey maybe its more common than I realise. But still too early. That'd be the equivalent of us losing our leaves in August. Something is wrong if thats happening lol.

Like I said, and posted references to - these temperatures are typical - and so is the budding - for the Tyler, TX (in NE Texas) area in February. And occasionally, but only very occasionally, frost temporarily damages a few delicate buds, but spring abounds with tons of flowering everything by the end of March. So mid February temps such as what we had this weekend are normal for this area (mid 50s for highs). Today's high of 42 is unusually cold for this time of year here, though of course it does happen. It's just not the AVERAGE. I posted the average highs and lows for this area for February already.

Nothing's wrong here - it's spring temp fluctuations as usual around here. We ALWAYS get some budding in February. In fact, I've been posting for years, including I believe on this thread, that at some point every February, I feel lulled into a false sense of security because it's actually warm enough for shorts and a T Shirt and I always get out in the yard and start digging around - but it's not the time to PLANT many things because we will almost certainly get another freeze.

But native plants are used to this so are very seldom harmed by early budding and then a freeze. They usually just regroup and keep budding and blooming.

What I DON'T want to bloom right now (and there's no sign of it) is my lemon tree - the one I can't manage to kill, the one I actually pulled up and threw in the back of a flower bed - and it took root and insisted on growing! It's supposedly viable to 17 degrees - and apparently snow and freezing temps and ice won't kill it because like I said, it's still alive. But one year it put out blooms and then a freeze happened and all the tiny lemons fell off. So hopefully that won't happen this year.
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Old 02-19-2019, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,077 posts, read 36,285,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Yea thats how it looked around early March in the parts of Texas I lived and spent spring in. Not February. Only thing I noticed really blooming in February would be bradford pears, but like I said, this would be later in the month like in the last week.


I love spring, but February is too early for me. I still wanna enjoy the rest of winter, haha. Hopefully those flowers do fine and they don't get ruined by a frost.



Btw I just compared, and Denton (where I spent 2/3 of my Texas springs) has an average low in the 30s in February, as opposed to Tyler with an average low in the 40s. Maybe those few degrees is all it takes to make the flowers return sooner or later. I know February up there was generally too cold to have all that return so early. Its crazy how different than is despite Tyler not being that far south in comparison.
Denton is definitely further north and also further west, and it has a different terrain, so I'm sure there's a difference in the average temps. This budding and even some blooming in February is very normal for this area, and I love it. By the middle of February I am ready for some spring!

Even though it was cold and rainy today (high of about 41 or so with steady rain), I went to Pier 1 and bought some things to decorate for spring and I'll probably do that tomorrow. For the rest of the week, we are in for thunderstorms and highs in the 50s and 60s - which is typical blustery weather for this time of year. I'm glad for the rain because regardless of what the summer brings, at least we are going into the summer with full lakes, creeks, etc.
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Old 02-19-2019, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,072 posts, read 3,399,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Denton is definitely further north and also further west, and it has a different terrain, so I'm sure there's a difference in the average temps. This budding and even some blooming in February is very normal for this area, and I love it. By the middle of February I am ready for some spring!

Even though it was cold and rainy today (high of about 41 or so with steady rain), I went to Pier 1 and bought some things to decorate for spring and I'll probably do that tomorrow. For the rest of the week, we are in for thunderstorms and highs in the 50s and 60s - which is typical blustery weather for this time of year. I'm glad for the rain because regardless of what the summer brings, at least we are going into the summer with full lakes, creeks, etc.



How was it in 2015 if you remember? I lived in West Texas at the time, and we got a lot of snow between late February and early March. We drove to Austin during the week of SXSW and when we left our town there was still snow, yet in Austin flowers were blooming on trees. By the end of the week and we returned home, some trees were starting to bloom. That was the latest I saw in Texas.

2015 was a great year for me, weatherwise. First time experiencing the change of seasons.
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Old 02-19-2019, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,077 posts, read 36,285,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
How was it in 2015 if you remember? I lived in West Texas at the time, and we got a lot of snow between late February and early March. We drove to Austin during the week of SXSW and when we left our town there was still snow, yet in Austin flowers were blooming on trees. By the end of the week and we returned home, some trees were starting to bloom. That was the latest I saw in Texas.

2015 was a great year for me, weatherwise. First time experiencing the change of seasons.
Let's see - we lived here in this house, and from what I recall it was just a typical year. Nothing really stands out to me one way or the other, except I think that was a year that a tornado touched down a few miles away - that was exciting. We get tornadic activity often during the spring and summer, but in all my years of living here, I've never had any serious tornado damage. But every season I do end up retreating to my "small, windowless interior room" during a tornado warning - with my dogs. Their breath stinks up that small, windowless, interior room, that's for sure!

This winter, we have had some snow flurries but no accumulation. We usually do get some snow accumulation here each year, but this winter has been more rainy than anything else. We did get snow flurries before Thanksgiving which was pretty unusual. A few years ago we had a white Christmas. That was cool. Most years we only get a couple of inches of snow accumulation and it's typically gone the next day - which frankly is how I want it to be.
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Old 02-19-2019, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,072 posts, read 3,399,662 times
Reputation: 7722
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Let's see - we lived here in this house, and from what I recall it was just a typical year. Nothing really stands out to me one way or the other, except I think that was a year that a tornado touched down a few miles away - that was exciting. We get tornadic activity often during the spring and summer, but in all my years of living here, I've never had any serious tornado damage. But every season I do end up retreating to my "small, windowless interior room" during a tornado warning - with my dogs. Their breath stinks up that small, windowless, interior room, that's for sure!

This winter, we have had some snow flurries but no accumulation. We usually do get some snow accumulation here each year, but this winter has been more rainy than anything else. We did get snow flurries before Thanksgiving which was pretty unusual. A few years ago we had a white Christmas. That was cool. Most years we only get a couple of inches of snow accumulation and it's typically gone the next day - which frankly is how I want it to be.



We got tornadoes where I was living that spring. It was nuts!



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IP-VEX8Zxms


Tornadoes are some of my favourite aspects of spring in the Midwest and plains. That and wild flowers.
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Old 02-19-2019, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,077 posts, read 36,285,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
We got tornadoes where I was living that spring. It was nuts!




Tornadoes are some of my favourite aspects of spring in the Midwest and plains. That and wild flowers.
I love big storms with lots of wind, heavy clouds, thunder, lightning, and tornado warnings! It was one of the things I missed most when I was living overseas. Except for when we lived in Japan - we definitely got big storms there!
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Old 02-20-2019, 11:43 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,072 posts, read 3,399,662 times
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Winter, I love thee but I will sure be glad when spring is here. A rough winter makes spring taste all the more sweet!!! (Feel the same about a rough summer and a nice cool fall)




Took this photo a little over an hour ago, before I dug my car out. I get why some people don't want winters like this, but I wouldn't have it any other way
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