U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 10-10-2017, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,852 posts, read 7,797,618 times
Reputation: 9469

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
Yes, I'm sure about. You can stop fascinating about coconut palms now.
I think coconuts are overrated.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-10-2017, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,852 posts, read 7,797,618 times
Reputation: 9469
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
For me that would be like 5-6 months of a drumroll. Everyones like a drumroll, the anticipation it creates and the comforting feeling that something is about to come to a head, a resolution. But if it lasts too long and you don't get the payoff (Winter) it can be just maddening.

And without winter, the ecstatic feeling brought upon by the arrival Spring never occurs. No crocuses poking through the snow, no branches suddenly crusted in green and purple buds, no heavy showers that reinvigorate the slumbering earth, and those first warm days (50-60F) when you can wear a short sleeved shirt... The very earth smells like life.

But only if you get Spring after Winter.
Hard freezes in winter pretty much eliminate the problem of sharing your house with insects and other creepy crawlies. Flying cockroaches as housemates are a fact of life in Houston homes, as are ants, termites, etc. Since moving north, other than a random fly or gnat in the summer, I am happy to say my home is insect-free. There are many advantages to living in a four season climate, eliminating household pests being one of them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2017, 10:03 AM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,278,751 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
They do not fruit Bermuda, 1 or two fruiting coconut palms under doted conditions notwithstanding. This is common knowledge for anyone whose been to Bermuda. Please post a pic of Coconut palms fruiting in Bermuda in the wild (not next to someone's house).
Well, you should have specified that qualifier. In that case, they do indeed sprout on their own, obviously not as well as in the true tropics, but they do. Did you even read through the threads I've shown you?

Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Coconuts and other tropical fruits prevent obesity? How's that working out in the coconut-growing islands?

Most obese countries in the world:

1. Palau
2. Nauru
3. Marshall Islands
4. Samoa
5. Tonga
7. Kiribati
8. Tuvalu

29 Most Obese Countries In The World - WorldAtlas.com
Not a symmetric comparison, because the hunter-gatherer genes of those Islanders predispose them to rapid weight gain. But regardless, they ended up with obesity precisely because they took up the more sedentary lifestyle, as well as fatty diet of the Western World, rather than stick with their traditional fruit/fish based diets.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2017, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,112 posts, read 1,305,291 times
Reputation: 1825
Quote:
Originally Posted by mvpsharky View Post
Still waiting for the season to change here ... It's October but feeling like August
Ugh, I love Summer weather but this heat through all of September and October is just exhausting. I’m over it. Yesterday was 80 degrees and 98% humidity in NY. Today is even warmer but less humid and muggy at least. I took my A/C unit out of my window about a week or 2 ago and that was a huge mistake.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2017, 10:45 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,728,729 times
Reputation: 30796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post


the hunter-gatherer genes of those Islanders predispose them to rapid weight gain. But regardless, they ended up with obesity precisely because they took up the more sedentary lifestyle, as well as fatty diet of the Western World, rather than stick with their traditional fruit/fish based diets.
All humans have hunter-gatherer genes. Agricultural staples (the advent of which actually reduced the amount of fat in the typical human diet, replacing it calorically with starchy carbohydrates) have only been around for 10,000 years in certain parts of the world, and about half that or less for most of the rest of the world.

Not enough time for any special gene to develop that doesn't make people fat from eating crap loads. That's the problem Pacific Islanders have. They eat crap loads of rice and bread.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2017, 11:08 AM
 
6,483 posts, read 4,069,179 times
Reputation: 16747
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Not enough time for any special gene to develop that doesn't make people fat from eating crap loads. That's the problem Pacific Islanders have. They eat crap loads of rice and bread.
Yes, and having plentiful coconuts available doesn't change that. Any more than growing coconuts in the US South would change people's lifestyle.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2017, 01:47 PM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,369,908 times
Reputation: 10919
Personally I love the change of seasons. Regardless of which season it is, by the time it's over I always find myself dying to get on to the next season.

Even in late summer, I'm ready for some winter and cold weather. It was in the 80's in Chicago very recently and I was sitting there yearning for some nice COLD weather.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2017, 04:47 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,278,751 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
All humans have hunter-gatherer genes. Agricultural staples (the advent of which actually reduced the amount of fat in the typical human diet, replacing it calorically with starchy carbohydrates) have only been around for 10,000 years in certain parts of the world, and about half that or less for most of the rest of the world.

Not enough time for any special gene to develop that doesn't make people fat from eating crap loads. That's the problem Pacific Islanders have. They eat crap loads of rice and bread.
I was referring specifically to the South Pacific hunter-gatherer genes: they indeed have a mutation that predisposes them to obesity. It corresponds with their history, settling the islands of the Pacific, where it would help carry them through times of little food and water common in the voyages. But with a settled lifestyle and recent adoption of Western diet, those genes start working against them. Amounts of rice and bread that do nothing to Europeans or Africans cause the Pacific Islanders to start packing the pounds:
https://gizmodo.com/how-a-powerful-o...the-1784266550

Quote:
By studying the genomes of more than 5,000 Samoans, researchers have uncovered a single gene that boosts a person’s obesity risk by upwards of 40 percent. Remarkably, this gene—which appears in a quarter of all Samoans—may have arisen in the population as they colonized the South Pacific.

As described in the latest edition of Nature Genetics, this “thrifty” genetic variant, called CREBRF, is associated with a 1.5 percent increase in Body Mass Index (BMI). So, for a person of average height weighing around 180 pounds, this gene corresponds to an extra 10 pounds. As noted by the researchers in their study, CREBRF promotes more efficient storage of fat and features “an effect size much larger than that of any other known common BMI risk variant.”
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Yes, and having plentiful coconuts available doesn't change that. Any more than growing coconuts in the US South would change people's lifestyle.
It doesn't change the fact that these healthy tropical foods would be in greater ease of access to those populations where they grow, which makes a huge difference regarding the ease with which ailments can be prevented (provided that people take on it, of course).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2017, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,381,283 times
Reputation: 7704
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
A feeling of lack tends to become amplified when the object in question is so close yet so far from attainment. That is the situation with much of the South outside S FL when it comes to coconuts and other tender tropicals: so many of these plants would otherwise be growing profusely through the region, but can't, as even a single 32°F/0°C can kill them. A region right across the sea from North Africa shouldn't be dealing which such cold.

So many QOL issues of the region would be made easier to solve if the climate were such that these plants could grow:
  • For one, many of these tropical fruits contain great health benefits, which go a long way in preventing ailments like obesity, diabetes, etc that the region has (especially in the poor/rural areas hit the hardest). The potential increase in disease vectors like mosquitoes from the warmer winters would be counteracted by the increased winter dry-season to help limit standing water (since no cold fronts come down to draw up rains from the Gulf); not to mention, there will be even greater variety of bats and other insectivores that keep bug populations in check (since they can range in from the tropics).

  • It also would single-handedly eliminate all disasters in the region except hurricanes and floods. Ice storms, catastrophic tornadoes, hail, etc as seen in places inland in the region would become a thing of the past, because elimination of cold fronts means elimination pf the dynamics that bring such weather ailments.

  • The Southern wilderness gets to be even more bio-diverse than it already is (and also more exotic). Imagine the tropical mangroves of Florida growing in the swamps of Louisiana? Or boa constrictors and spider monkeys deep in the heart of Texas?

It can also be argued that real estate in places like S FL, and SoCal wouldn't be near as expensive, as there would be more land of warm winter weather spread around for the snowbirds to flock to. So less over-the-top condo developments in S FL that create income inequality, and limit the amount of untouched beach.

Essentially, the cold fronts limit the South from reaching its full potential, like making a A- when it could have been an A+. Elimination of those cold fronts can be the one good thing that comes out of anthropogenic global warming.
Lol okay. Coconuts will cure everything! -.- I am from Miami which grows coconuts and has the climate you describe. Guess what? We still have obesity and diabetes down there and contrary to your own popular belief, coconut is not a big part of the average diet in South Florida. Also South Florida still can get tornadoes and hail. And I would take tornadoes and ice storms way before hurricanes anyway. Why would the Louisiana bayou need to look like Florida's mangrove swamps? It's fine the way it is. You are now talking about changing Cajun food and thems fighting words!

Why in the world would anyone want a jungle in Texas? Eastern Texas is humid enough it doesn't need to feel like the Amazon on top of it. We got enough rattle snakes in Texas and now you wanna add boa constrictors? Spider monkeys? Isn't George W. Bush enough? I like Texas with it's rolling hills of oak and mesquite and spring time bluebonnets. Its hot enough down there we don't need it to be a jungle. The South is already a sauna in the summer it doesn't need to be sweltering year around. I think loblolly pines, bald cypress and southern live oaks are beautiful enough.

Btw Miami has worse mosquitoes than anywhere I have lived in Texas. In Texas the colder weather kills mosquitoes. In Miami the slightly drier sometimes cool weather only decreases them a bit. They're still persistent for pretty much the whole year. Your theories are nonsense.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2017, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,381,283 times
Reputation: 7704
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
It's not just cold snaps that kill coconut palms, but also the average temperature in the winter needs to be high enough.

Case in point, Bermuda. The record cold temperature of Bermuda 44F, and while they can grow coconut palms, the trees don't fruit. It's just too cold their in the winter.

So bottom line, eliminate cold fronts and there wouldn't be fruiting coconuts in Galveston or Jacksonville either.
Well that doesn't make sense because Miami's record low is 27 and coconuts grow like weeds. In fact Miami reaches 44 almost every year as a guarantee. Something else must be messing with the fruits down there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top